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Cruizer-class Brig-Sloops of the Royal Navy


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#141
trippwj

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Looked it up, it was Fincham's Treatise on Masting Ships. My specific source I used was the 2nd edition of 1843 as found on Google Books.

 

That makes sense - Fincham was a major part of the School f Naval Architecture with Inman.  His success may, perhaps, be best described by the death notice in The Times (1859):

 

The death of this gentleman [John Fincham] took place at his residence at Highland Lodge, near Portsmouth, yesterday morning, in his 75th year. The deceased gentleman will be best remembered by the general public as for many years master shipwright of Portsmouth Dockyard, and more especially as the builder of the celebrated Arrogant, the first screw frigate possessed by this country, and still looked on as one of the finest of her class. Much of his time and study was devoted to the introduction of the screw propeller into the British navy. For a long period he was superintendent of the School of Naval Architecture at Portsmouth. His History of Naval Architecture, Outlines of Shipbuilding, a Treatise on Laying-off Ships, and on Masting Ships, are unequalled in the English language for the amount of research and professional knowledge they contain.

 

His 1843 work was at the tail end of Symonds tenure as Surveyor of the Navy, and reflects one of the 3 major views in that prolonged period of discord (Symonds' "empirical" school of shipbuilding came into conflict both with the "scientific" school led by the new class of professional naval architects and the first School of Naval Architecture (such as Fincham, Morgan, Creuze, Pearse &c.), and the "traditional" school led by Master Shipwrights from the Royal Dockyards.  Quite an interesting period of time for the British Navy that period from about 1790 through 1850.


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Wayne

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#142
Talos

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That makes sense - Fincham was a major part of the School f Naval Architecture with Inman.  His success may, perhaps, be best described by the death notice in The Times (1859):

 

The death of this gentleman [John Fincham] took place at his residence at Highland Lodge, near Portsmouth, yesterday morning, in his 75th year. The deceased gentleman will be best remembered by the general public as for many years master shipwright of Portsmouth Dockyard, and more especially as the builder of the celebrated Arrogant, the first screw frigate possessed by this country, and still looked on as one of the finest of her class. Much of his time and study was devoted to the introduction of the screw propeller into the British navy. For a long period he was superintendent of the School of Naval Architecture at Portsmouth. His History of Naval Architecture, Outlines of Shipbuilding, a Treatise on Laying-off Ships, and on Masting Ships, are unequalled in the English language for the amount of research and professional knowledge they contain.

 

His 1843 work was at the tail end of Symonds tenure as Surveyor of the Navy, and reflects one of the 3 major views in that prolonged period of discord (Symonds' "empirical" school of shipbuilding came into conflict both with the "scientific" school led by the new class of professional naval architects and the first School of Naval Architecture (such as Fincham, Morgan, Creuze, Pearse &c.), and the "traditional" school led by Master Shipwrights from the Royal Dockyards.  Quite an interesting period of time for the British Navy that period from about 1790 through 1850.

 

His forward-looking school certainly explains why it looked late 19th century. The first edition of that book dates back to 1829, back when he was Superindentent of the School of Naval Architecture and three years before it closed in 1832.

 

That whole era is interesting to me too. D.K. Brown's Before the Ironclad, which covers the post-Napoelonic War part of that era got me into it, and also had me looking at the earlier part during the wars, with people like Bentham. Brown talks a lot about Seppings and Symonds though, though he isn't (and I agree) a big fan of Symonds.


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#143
Beef Wellington

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Wasn't quite sure where to put these pics, but here seemed as good a place as any (Sorry these aren't exactly professional quality).  One of the interesting models in the Rogers collection at the Annapolis Naval Museum is this the following model of a Cruizer Class sloop.  I curse myself because I forgot to take picture of the plate, so if anyone else has that info then please share.  I'm not going to analyze, but the following jumped out at me.  I wonder how much of this was reflective of reality and how much was model makers whimsy....

 

  1. Dare I say, the square tuck.... :P
  2. The presence of a Spritsail Topsail Yard
  3. Figurehead which are not shown on any plans
  4. Cannons rather than carronades, and the inclusion of 2 additional stern chasers
  5. Stern deck houses appear consistent with those shown on many plans
  6. Presence of fore platform, and bucklers on the foremost gun port
  7. Capstan placement consistent with plans and more logically located toward stern
  8. Aft davits which were RN anathema

IMG_1620.JPG IMG_1621.JPG IMG_1622.JPG IMG_1623.JPG IMG_1625.JPG


Edited by Beef Wellington, 04 January 2017 - 01:59 AM.

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Cheers,
 
Jason


"But if you ask the reason of this, many will be found who never thought about it"
 
In the shipyard:

HMS Snake (c1797: Cruizer Class, ship rigged sloop)

HMS Jason (c1794: Artois Class 38 gun frigate)


#144
JerseyCity Frankie

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Is this the model that has its t'gallent sails set and nothing else? There is a model on display I recall, with that very odd configuration. One I do not think is ever seen in actual practice.
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#145
Chuck

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A few more pictures in this article that are all about this model. Enjoy

 

Attached File  English Brig of War.pdf   1.68MB   66 downloads

 

 


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#146
jbshan

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Thanks for the article, Chuck.  Mr. Rogers collected ship models and had them repaired/restored as needed.  Sometimes the records are a bit scanty, especially as there were 200 years between their origin and his acquisition, then repairs he instigated.

Fair American was assumed to be period work, until the almost chance discovery of a letter detailing the work done on her in the 20th century at Rogers' behest.

We must be careful and thorough.


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#147
Beef Wellington

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Thanks Chuck for sharing, a very interesting read.  There are couple of topics that I think I would have expected to be commented on or explored more but weren't.  The similarity of the model to existing original plans is not really explored, nor the fact that these workhorse brigs probably changed significantly over the course of their commissioning for those that lasted, there were at least a couple of these that switched from brig to ship rigged and back in the course of their lifetime, so additions of stern deckhouses doesn't seem too much of a stretch, and again, this is a feature identified on original plans.  Although not really on point, the model in the NMM is least like any of the available plans so reliance on comparison to that is probably a sticky wicket.

 

I suspect that the figurehead is a later addition to appease some owner's ideal that a "ship model should have one", but no evidence to back that up other than other documentary evidence to the contrary in surviving plans.  Of course any captain or owner of the actual ship could have added a figurehead....

 

Bottom line, its a beautiful model.


Edited by Beef Wellington, 07 January 2017 - 08:53 PM.

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Cheers,
 
Jason


"But if you ask the reason of this, many will be found who never thought about it"
 
In the shipyard:

HMS Snake (c1797: Cruizer Class, ship rigged sloop)

HMS Jason (c1794: Artois Class 38 gun frigate)


#148
BANYAN

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Some great reading here, thanks BW and all contributors.

 

cheers

 

Pat


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#149
Joe V.

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Thanks for the photos Jason. The brig model had been acquired, but wasn't displayed yet the lest time I visited the USNA museum. I found that article awhile back in my research of the class. Interesting read and really shows the lack of hard information, as well as the changes that occurred over time in such a large class of ships. 


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