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General / organisation of wood

wood supplier material

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41 replies to this topic

#21
michael mott

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Hi there,

 

I went through the topics of the board and saw that there are general issues in getting the right wood for building your ship model. My recommendation is to go to your local carpenter and see what kind of wood he is using in his daily work and which comes from the area you life. You can spend a lot of money in ordering wood via a retailer and get a glossy and nicely wrapped material. I believe that the beauty lie's in a non perfect wood.

 

All of the woods I use are mainly out of the area where I live: Swiss pear, cubed pear, walnut, plum, boxwood (mainly from old graveyards) and many more. On the pictures which are attached you can see three different kinds of wood: Swiss pear, boxwood (approx. 450 years old) and Argentina Lapacho which I got from a turist who visited my Museum (e.g. the Lion is made from this wood).

 

What are your suggestions?

Ivan I have just finished reading through this whole thread, and the side comments about why different people choose to use the woods they do. so to bring us back to your question.

 

You ask what are our suggestions.

 

As has been pointed out by a few, woods vary a great deal depending on where they grow.

You make the point that you use Swiss pear, boxwood, walnut which grow near you. we are not all so lucky to have dense fine hardwoods growing locally.

 

With respect to visiting the local carpenter to see the sorts of woods he uses. Where I live the local carpenters throw spruce and fir 2x4's together to build houses as fast as they can before the wood winds into a propeller. Fine cabinet work is of the plywood and moulding attached variety. There are a couple of hardwood stores that sells rough lumber in the city 50 miles away.

 

I just happen to like processing my own wood and have been doing so for 40 years, and also salvage old furniture when the wood is appropriate for a project. My local woods i.e. native ones are Aspen, Hawthorn, Pin Cherries, Saskatoon berry, Poplar, Birch, Willow, Spruce. Lodge-pole Pine. imported or non local varieties include Caragana, Lilacs, Apples, Mountain Ash, Elm, the non local varieties are generally not readily available unless you happen to be where some pruning is happening.

 

I particularly like the color and density of the wood from white lilac, I pruned a 4 inch tree 30 years ago and am still using small pieces from it.

sometimes I find a particularly dense piece of Spruce or Fir, these are generally from areas that are high altitude and very slow growing or starved for water.

 

Michael


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Current builds  Bristol Pilot Cutter 1:8

 

                                Skipjack 19 foot Launch 1:8

 

                               Herreshoff Buzzards Bay 14 1:8

 

Other projects  Pilot Cutter 1:500

 

                         Maria, Sloop 1:2

 

Restoration      A Bassett Lowke steamship Albertic 1:100

 

Anything you can imagine is possible, when you put your mind to it.


#22
merchen

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Thank you for all your replies. I am glad that this topic is of interest. Maybe there is a misunderstanding. I do not cut by myself the trees and are waiting till I can use it. 

 

Meanwhile I have a good network of carpenters, furniture producers, lumber mills and farmers around my village. They know me and my work and are proactively offering me their material. Furthermore I use the wood of old furniture as source for my models. I rarely use exotic wood from other countries and never ordered something via internet. Why should I, when everything is around me. 

 

Usually I get a whole branch which I can cut with my band-saw or by hand. And of course, sometimes the carpenter in our village is cutting it in the sizes I need. You do not need that much large tools.

 

 

P1000586.JPG

This is my most important tools preparing the wood

 

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This my favorite knife to grave cherry stone

 

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Here you can see how I work with the cherry stone

 

P1000582.JPG

A finished antic with more material to use


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#23
Altduck

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Merchen

Most interesting, and very fine work.

Thank you for including the photo of yourself holding the knife with the handle resting on your shoulder.

Looks like it helps steady the tool for the small, precise carving you do.

Richard
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     Richard

 

 


#24
michael mott

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To quote a line from an old Movie "That's not a knife this is a knife" Merchen thanks for the picture i can see how the way you are holding it that it works more like an engraving knife.

 

Michael


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Current builds  Bristol Pilot Cutter 1:8

 

                                Skipjack 19 foot Launch 1:8

 

                               Herreshoff Buzzards Bay 14 1:8

 

Other projects  Pilot Cutter 1:500

 

                         Maria, Sloop 1:2

 

Restoration      A Bassett Lowke steamship Albertic 1:100

 

Anything you can imagine is possible, when you put your mind to it.


#25
merchen

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An alle Bekannte und Freunde in diesem Forum, ich lade euch herzlich ein am Freitag, dem 03. Juni um 18.00 Uhr zum Stapellauf vom neuen Modell, dem Maerchenschiff. Dieses Modell wird ab diesem Tag zu der Sammlung im Msueum mit ausgestellt.

 

Wer Zeit und Moeglichkeit hat, dabei zu sein, wird sehr herzlich begruesst.

Das wird ein Spektakel der Superlative dieses Jahrhunderts!!!

 

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#26
Altduck

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Google translates Merchen's last post to:

 

"To all friends and acquaintances in this forum , I invite you cordially on Friday , June 03 at 18.00 for launching the new model , the Maerchenschiff . This model is issued to the collection in Msueum from this tag.

Who has time and opportunity to be there , is warmly welcomed .

This is a spectacle of superlatives this century !!!"

 

 

The translation looks like it needs a little work, but the model is absolutely exquisite!  What is the scale, or overall length of the model?

 

Thanks for sharing your work,

 

Richard


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     Richard

 

 


#27
mtaylor

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Seeing work like this makes want to take up knitting or fishing... maybe both.


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Mark

"The shipwright is slow, but the wood is patient." - me


Current Build:

Licorne - 1755 from Hahn Plans (Scratch) Version 2.0

Past Builds:
Triton Cross-Section
USS Constellaton (kit bashed to 1854 Sloop of War (Gallery) Build Log
Wasa (Gallery)


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#28
allanyed

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Merchen

 

Last year you complained that there were very few responses to your post.  Most members probably see your German post and tune out immediately as they do not want to take the time to start getting a translation,  which you should be doing.

 

Regardless, the work is remarkable and a joy to see.   Can you post (in English please) more about the tools and methods that you use  Seeing the finished work is great, but many of us are interested in learning how to do this and showing your tools and methods would be very welcome and much appreciated.

 

Thank you for sharing

 

Allan


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Current Builds Litchfield (50) 1730, Effie M. Morrissey  

I can explain it to you but I can't comprehend it for you - Ed Koch, former NYC mayor

 


#29
pompey2

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Merchen

 

Your work is incredible, truly amazing.... and carved with practically a sword, wonderful

 

Nick


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Current build USF Confederacy - http://modelshipworl...ways-scale-164/

Previous log - HMS Victory - http://modelshipworl...raft-172/page-1

 

 


#30
merchen

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Hi there,

 

coming back to the question of Allan.

Some of my tools I created myself or used existing and individualized them for my needs. Larger tools or specific tools I order from fischer-pforzheim.de (specialized on watchmaker and goldsmith tools).

 

Think it would be quite a challenge to write down the process and methods how I carve the figures and build the ships. Could do some short movies and upload it on YouTube. Nevertheless everyone is also invited to visit me here in Germany so that I can give some advice and watch me working on my newest ship model (Funurela Gondola). 

 

Best regards,

Ivan

 

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#31
Mark P

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Greetings Merchen;

 

Thank you for posting the pictures of your model.  She is a fantastic-looking vessel.  Is she your own design,  or is she based on an illustration somewhere? The carvings are beautifully executed,  and the overall impression is really eye-catching.  I could spend a long time looking at your model,  and admiring the quality of the work.

 

I am also greatly impressed by the size of the knife you use,  and the idea of using cherry stones as raw material. 

 

Could you tell me where I might be able to find the picture you posted last year,  the engraved views of a vessel which seems to have been part of the basis for your design.  This is in post number 3,  the one with all the pictures of box trees and planks,  etc. 

 

All the best,

 

Mark P


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#32
donrobinson

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Merchen, That is truly remarkable, to come visit and watch you create these beautiful works of art would be inspiring. The only problem would be is getting me to leave :). What part of Germany do you live?

Take Care and please keep posting


Edited by donrobinson, 12 August 2016 - 06:36 PM.

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#33
merchen

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My new model: the "Funerale Gondola" is growing slowly.

These are mostly carvings at the model.

If someone wants to learn how to carve, he can contact me.

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#34
donrobinson

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That is amazing work Merchen, absolutely beautiful. You are a very gifted artist 


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#35
dvm27

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Your choice of ship modeling subjects certainly showcases your extraordinary carving talents, Ivan. I wonder if our readers are aware of the beautiful book published featuring your ship models or you website?
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Greg

website
Admiralty Models

moderator Echo Cross-section build
Admiralty Models Cross-section Build

Finished build
Pegasus, 1776, cross-section

Current build
Speedwell, 1752


#36
mtaylor

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Your choice of ship modeling subjects certainly showcases your extraordinary carving talents, Ivan. I wonder if our readers are aware of the beautiful book published featuring your ship models or you website?

 

Book?  Website?  Do tell.... 


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Mark

"The shipwright is slow, but the wood is patient." - me


Current Build:

Licorne - 1755 from Hahn Plans (Scratch) Version 2.0

Past Builds:
Triton Cross-Section
USS Constellaton (kit bashed to 1854 Sloop of War (Gallery) Build Log
Wasa (Gallery)


Member of the Nautical Research Guild


#37
merchen

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The picture shows the museum-catalog.

and my museum website is www.historische-schiffsmodelle.com

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#38
mtaylor

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Wonderful website, Ivan.  I've bookmarked it and will go back to spend more time.  


Edited by mtaylor, 11 December 2016 - 09:13 PM.

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Mark

"The shipwright is slow, but the wood is patient." - me


Current Build:

Licorne - 1755 from Hahn Plans (Scratch) Version 2.0

Past Builds:
Triton Cross-Section
USS Constellaton (kit bashed to 1854 Sloop of War (Gallery) Build Log
Wasa (Gallery)


Member of the Nautical Research Guild


#39
Charlie1805

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Hello everybody,

 
If you have the possibility to go to Kressbronn, check out the models! It is worth it .. You have hardly seen anything like that. High quality model building. Thank you Ivan, for giving us the opportunity to admire your works of art.
 
Greeting Karlheinz

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#40
merchen

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Von der ursprünglichen Illustration zu ausgeführt Schnitzereien, ist es sehr einfach, wenn man weiß, was man tut.

Für das Schnitzen ich nur "Buchsbaum" zu verwenden, in diesem Fall ist die Platte 12 mm dick.

 

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