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Fabric for Your Sails and Where To Buy


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30 replies to this topic

#21
mtaylor

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What is the complete title of "TFFM"?

 

Ron,

 

TFFM = The Fully Framed Model.   There's 4 volumes.. and they are available from Seawatch Books who are a sponsor here with an ad on the front page.  I find they are a great resource even though I'm not building a Swan Class ship.


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Mark

"The shipwright is slow, but the wood is patient." - me


Current Build:

Licorne - 1755 from Hahn Plans (Scratch) Version 2.0

Past Builds:
Triton Cross-Section
USS Constellaton (kit bashed to 1854 Sloop of War (Gallery) Build Log
Wasa (Gallery)


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#22
thibaultron

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Thanks! I'll be getting the suppliment at the begining of the month.


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#23
Brian the extraordinaire

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Hi there, a different Brian here.  I always soak my sails in coffee or tea to get that aged look before fitting to my models, but I have read some negative comments about this process due to the acidity in the solution. 

 

Any advice appreciated, thank you. 


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#24
JerseyCity Frankie

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I too have heard the argument that tea or coffe will set in motion a chemical process that winds up ruining sails, but one seldom sees sails disintegrating off models. Certainly very old models have sails that start to go to pieces, but who is to say if those sails were ever dipped in coffee? They very likely are just old. I say go ahead and stain you sails with caffeinated beverages, the color you get is perfect and hard to improve upon with other more complex methods.
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#25
druxey

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TFFM = The Fully Framed Model, or the title in full: The Fully Framed Model, HMN Swan Class Sloops 1767-1780 in 4 Volumes, SeaWatchBooks.


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#26
Dee_Dee

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Brian,

 

Ah yes, the on going discussion about coffee and tea.  As for the acid level of coffee and tea, I'm not a chemist.  But I do know, if I drink more than one cup of coffee, I will be doubled over in severe pain, looking for that bottle of Zantac.  

 

FWIW, sunlight / UV light does more damage to fabric and faster.   

 

 

Here's a different idea to add color to your sail.

 

From a distance, a life size sail has a monotone color.  As you get closer to the sail, you start to notice various colors in the sail. Then up close, you see all the color variations, stains, markings and more.  Instead of dyeing a sail to a monotone color, try using watercolor paints!  Nothing fancy, just an ordinary set of kids watercolor paints.  When you're done painting the color on, let it dry, then add highlights with colored pencils. 

 

Here's a link that does a good job on 'how to' use water color paints on fabric:  http://www.ellaclair...abric-tutorial/

 

As for colored pencils, a couple of yellows, a couple of browns, a dark red, a medium blue and white should do it.  When you're done adding highlights, set the color with an iron set to medium.  I prefer Prismacolor pencils over the inexpensive grade school box of pencils.  Prismacolor pencils have a higher level of wax and you can buy them individually.   Prismacolor has a quality control problem, so check each pencil to make sure the 'lead' is in the center of the pencil.  

 

When that's all done, use a 'fine point fabric paint pen' in a gold, bronze or silver color, to add a hint of hardware details to the sail.    

 

Dee Dee

 


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Current Build

     -  Dragon - Corel   One design International Class Yacht

 

Completed Builds

     - Sloup Coquillier / Shell Fish Sloop  -  Corel -Based on the 'Bergère de Domrémy' / 'The Shepherdess from Domrémy'          

     - Muscongus Bay Lobster Smack  -  Scratch built based on drawings & info from Chapelle's book "American Small Sailing Craft"  with working center board!! 

     - Muscongus Bay Lobster Smack  -  Midwest Kit Major Bash    

                                                                                                      

On the Shelf

      - Glad Tidings-MS     - Gretel-Mamoli     - Emma C. Berry-MS    - Chesapeake Bay Pilot Boat, Semi-scratch 

            

Find yourself hoping you never reach your destination

10427354_10203056238189098_7201610402045

 


#27
druxey

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Here are examples of sails made using TFFM techniques. Judge for yourself.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Sails 1.jpg
  • Sails 2.jpg
  • Sails 3.jpg
  • Sails 4.jpg

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#28
Dee_Dee

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On the "How Realistic Can One Make Sails" thread, I posted one option to add fullness to sails, using a drawn fabric technique. 

 

Here's another technique for adding fullness to a (three sided) main sail.  This simple technique can be used on fabric, paper and silkspan.

 

All sail patters (I've seen) show a 90* right angle at the tack of the sail.  If you increase this angle, by one or two degrees, the length of the leech will increase by ~1/8".  That doesn't sound like a lot, however, when the sail is attached to the boom and mast, the leech will be too long. 

 

In the second photo, the foot and luff of this paper sail were taped to the cutting board at a 90* angle.  The additional length in the leech 'billows' and gives a natural looking shape to the sail.

 

The increased angle will vary, pending the angle of the boom.  

 

Very nice sails Druxey.  FWIW, my modeling interest are working boats and classic wood boats, not warships.

Add Length to the Luft   2G7A2731.jpg

 

 Add Length to the luft adds fullness to the sail  2G7A2730.jpg   


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Current Build

     -  Dragon - Corel   One design International Class Yacht

 

Completed Builds

     - Sloup Coquillier / Shell Fish Sloop  -  Corel -Based on the 'Bergère de Domrémy' / 'The Shepherdess from Domrémy'          

     - Muscongus Bay Lobster Smack  -  Scratch built based on drawings & info from Chapelle's book "American Small Sailing Craft"  with working center board!! 

     - Muscongus Bay Lobster Smack  -  Midwest Kit Major Bash    

                                                                                                      

On the Shelf

      - Glad Tidings-MS     - Gretel-Mamoli     - Emma C. Berry-MS    - Chesapeake Bay Pilot Boat, Semi-scratch 

            

Find yourself hoping you never reach your destination

10427354_10203056238189098_7201610402045

 


#29
probablynot

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In real terms, distorting the shape of the sail to increase the length of the leech would result in a very inefficient sail. It would simply spill the wind that you'd otherwise be using to propel the boat.

A leech line (embedded inthe leech seam, and tightened) might redeem matters, but I reckon the sail would still look a bit like a captive parachute.
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Brian

Current project: - Constructo "Silhouet" 1893 (Dutch barge) http://modelshipworl...constructo-160/

Some previous builds - HMS Bounty Launch [Model Shipways kit] http://modelshipworl...s-116-smallish/

Corel's Half Moon (lightly 'bashed')  http://modelshipworl...scale-150-wood/

A 1:12 scratch-build of 'Anastasia', my old sailing kayak from back in the 1940s. http://modelshipworl...by-probablynot-a-18-re-build-of-my-1949-kayak/

Next project: - I'm thinking.   Might be Victory Models' HMS Fly.  A pretty ship - miles of rigging ...


#30
thibaultron

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Don't have to sail the model, just make it look like it is. :-)


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#31
JerseyCity Frankie

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Sail shape is very important for sail performance and this has always been understood by sailmakers No Sail is ever realy flat or two dimensional when set and drawing and in fact a perfectly flat sail won't work to it's full potential in exactly the same way an aircraft wing wouldn't generate lift if it were flat too. By way of illustration here is a photo of a modern Kevlar sail being manufactured. It's being laid up over a rigid form, the exact shape of the form will have been painstakingly arrived at after much computation. Kevlar has zero elasticity so when complete this is the shape it will always assume when set on the racing boat it is being made for, so the forms shape represents the sailmakers idea of a perfect sail shape. Alterations in the shape will effect the sail performance when they get out on the water. This understanding of how sails function is not new, sailmakers have always understood these concepts and have always sewn their sails with an eye toward how they will set when put to use. So very few seams on sails that would otherwise be nominally two dimensional are sewn in a perfect straight line, there are nearly always subtle curves involved. Now on a model MOST of these subtle curves are going to be invisible but on the other hand NO sail that is depicted as drawing wind should ever be flat.

Attached Thumbnails

  • IMG_0249.JPG

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