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To help kit developers and kit builders alike-What would you like to see developed for the hobby.


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107 replies to this topic

#21
JerseyCity Frankie

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I would like to see the amount of documentation in the kits greatly expanded. Of course I would like a lot of full scale plan sheets but there could be a lot more information in each kit. I could imagine a thick well produced booklet containing detailed drawings of specific areas of the rig done in perspective drawings - much like the excellent G F Campbell drawings found in Longridge's Anatomy of Nelson's Ships. Illustrations that are well done and show every detail in the context of where it will be on the ship.- this is not rocket science this is simply a mater of paying a good illustrator. It will add to the cost of the kit but it would remove a lot of the frustration from the project while at the same time adding to the value of the kit. Since you are printing a booklet you may as well hire a historian to write a decent history and illustrate that too, with whatever contemporary prints paintings or drawings which can be obtained. Yes this adds a lot to the production cost but it also lends credibility to the project. Too many kits of the past made do with minimal plan sheets with lousy drawing and poor printing. Note that little of this makes sense unless the money is spent to create a quality product. Putting together a ho-hum booklet with lousy drawings is just going to make your product line look bad.


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#22
Cathead

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Frankie, I've considered pitching that service to kit makers before, having had the same thoughts as yourself. No idea if it's a sensible plan or not.


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Current build: US Revenue Cutter "Ranger", Corel, 1:64

 

Previous builds:

Naval: 18th century longboat, Model Shipways, 1:48; Naval gun kits from Model Shipways; Bounty launch, Model Shipways, 1:16

Missouri River craft: Missouri River steamboat Bertrand, scratchbuilt in 1:87;  Lewis & Clark barge, scratchbuilt in 1:48;
Missouri River keelboat, scratchbuilt in 1:87; Missouri River steamboat Far West, scratchbuilt in 1:87


#23
RichardG

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Now here's a question with a million answers  :)

 

Consistent scale. I'd personally prefer 1/48th but that can get large really quickly.

 

Smaller ships. No larger than 30 inches. Less than 24 would be better. Bigger may seem better but how many more incomplete Victory's do we need?

 

Period: Sail to Steam would be an interesting period. For me 1750-1900's.

 

Nationality: Don't care

 

Building method: POB or POF. POF preferred if laser cut. Not solid.

 

Materials: Wood  ;). Top-quality wood can get very expensive - no clue how to solve that one.

 

Cost: < $500. $200 would be better but it would have to be small to be that cheap.

 

I would also like to see some opportunity for customization. I would assume there are ships where a number of them were built to the same basic plan but then had variations that could allow the building of a specific vessel.  

 

Richard.

 

 


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#24
Rick01

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How about a series devoted to Australian exploratory ships.

HM Brig Lady Nelson, top sail schooner Enterprize, HM Cutter Mermaid (slightly more accurate version) all come to mind.

Scale at 1:48

Price range $200.00 ~ $350.00 

 

With the number of Aussies on this forum alone I'm sure there's a market for models celebrating our history in addition to those "First Fleet" vessels already available.

 

Rick



#25
vossy

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I would love post WW2 Australian Warships in wood and metal at a scale of about 1:200. Especially my beloved HMAS Torrens.

 

chris


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#26
GuntherMT

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Keeping in mind that I already have 2 projects started and 4 kits on the shelf, so this would be 'far future' sort of a build for me...

 

I would like to see a west coast counterpart to the Pride of Baltimore II - specifically the Californian (or the C.W. Lawrence which it is a replica of, if you prefer to build it w/o power).  Maybe make it buildable either way, no idea if that would be feasible.

 

1:48 scale (yes, it would be fairly largish).

 

It's from the US.  :)

 

I have not done POF, but that would be interesting.  POB would be fine too, but would need to be short spaced bulkheads like the Cheerful or AVS, not like far too many kits where fillers are almost a requirement.

 

Price - would depend on materials.  Given how much of a kit I replace with other wood anyway, and how long kits take me to build, it wouldn't bother me to pay well over $500 if the kit was well made, with good plans, and included quality wood that I didn't need to replace, including stock for masting (i.e. no dowels).

 

Build time is going to vary hugely from person to person I believe.  Lets call is 1200-1500 hours, rather than trying to say 1 year or whatever.

 

Difficulty?  Intermediate to advanced by the time I could get this one onto my bench.\

 

-----------------------------

 

In more generalities - I enjoy, and would be interested in building ships from the mid 1700's up through the early transitional steam stuff like the Alabama or Kearsarge, but I have little to no interest in the earlier era ships like the Mayflower.  For a completely different style, I eventually want to build a 1940's era Chriscraft speedboat, as I think they are quite beautiful.


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#27
WaltB

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I really like the late-18th to early 20th century sailing vessels. They can be square sails (brigs, brigantines) or fore-and-aft (sloops, cutters, schooners). The old model of the Newsboy was a beauty; but Model Expo no longer offers it. It would be great as a POF kit.

 

I would like to see more planked models, especially plank on frame. I'm just finishing my first planked model, the Emma C. Berry. I've made many mistakes with it and would be tempted to do it again, but my wife would kick me out if i did. But if i had a new plank on frame. . . ?? (I might get away with it  :( ).

 

I need larger scale. At my age, my steady hand, keen eye, and nerves of steel are starting to fade. i can deal easily with 1:48; larger would be better. For example, i finished the solid hull Phantom from Model Expo but at 1:96 it was difficult. I would really like to see the Phantom as a 1:32 POF kit. It's a beautiful ship. But a good POB model would also be fun and challenging.

 

The kit must have quality materials and very good plans; the Berry is a good example--a great kit). Chuck's POB model of the Cheerful Is a good example of a very nice set of plans. (I hope he finishes his practicum).

 

II don;t mind spending a year or two to make a good model. I don't mind spending $200 - $300 for a good kit (even $350 for a really nice model).

 

I hope these comments help. I'd like to see some new, really nice kits come on the market.

 

Walt


Edited by WaltB, 03 June 2016 - 05:40 AM.

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Patience, patience; slow and easy makes the model.


#28
amateur

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In Den Helder (netherlands) there is a nice example of such a transition-ship
SS Bonaire, steam/sail, nicely shaped hull, etc.
Would make a nice kit.

Jan

Attached Thumbnails

  • image.jpeg

Edited by amateur, 03 June 2016 - 05:54 AM.

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#29
amateur

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With respect to scale: the current market seems to ask for large scale models, to give the opportunity for detailing. Although i understand that wish, for me this is the reson not to go for a kit next. I am (still) strugling with the rigging of a Corel kit of Prins Willem, but another kit resulting in a 90centimeter model is a nogo area: i simply don't have the space to get another one in. Next model is restricted to 40 cm max, either a relatively small ship at 1:50/1:96, or a slightly largership at 1:96/1:192

There used to be a Dutch firm that did some small ships, at 1:100. Resulting models about 25 centimets (that's 10 inch for you non-metrics:))
Rather basic kits, solid hull, partly precut, basic rigging, but great starter-kits, with quite a lot of detailing-options. Firm went backrupt, and no one else continued the range. Price of these kits was relatively low, which made them perfect starters for younger builders (toy shops where the main outlet for the firm).
I did them all (one still unfinished after 25 years....)
This is what i mean: my third kit, at age 16, 30 years outside a glass case :)

Jan

Attached Thumbnails

  • veerschip.jpg

Edited by amateur, 03 June 2016 - 08:05 AM.

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#30
grsjax

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Small to medium size work boats and merchant vessels.  Preferably POF.  something that has not been done to death already.  Fishing boats from anywhere, small sail and steam merchantmen that worked the small ports rather than the big ocean freighters like clippers and downeasters.  The work a day steam boats that far out numbered the big show boats.

 

Better plans and documentation, better quality wood, cast fittings that are well made, no plastic unless there is no other way to do the job, models of boats that were real or at least conform to what a real boat of the type and time would look like.


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My advice and comments are always worth what you paid for them.


#31
geoff

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I agree with some previous ideas. An area that really fascinates me is the transition era between sail and steam and paddle steamers.


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#32
jonny.amy

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I'd like to suggest a more obscure type of vessel - this is a Merchant Brig circa 1795 bought in to the Royal Navy to test Centerboards / Drop Keels  on larger vessels. This design was developed and investigated by John Schank.

 

http://collections.r...ects/66542.html

 

The National Maritime Museum says:

 

"Schank entered the navy at a young age, and was known for his skill in ship construction and mechanical design. While he was a lieutenant in 1776 he was in charge of assembling ships to battle the American Revolutionaries on Lake Champlain. He constructed HMS 'Inflexible', which he also commanded as part of a fleet that defeated General Benedict Arnold's fleet in October 1776. He was made a captain in 1783, and bought his design for ships with sliding keels before the Admiralty, which was incorporated by the Admiralty into ships. In 1821 Schank attained the rank of admiral of the blue".

 

 

Scale: 1/64th to 1/32nd

Size: Max. 800mm

Period: 1750-1900's.

Nationality: Don't care

Building method: POB or POF: POF preferred if laser cut (consider POF method used for Longboat and Pinnace as 'easier' introduction to POF building??).

Materials: Basswood / Lime - not Walnut (unless it has a very fine/even grain)

Cost: sub $500 inc. shipping to mainland UK/Europe.
 


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Current Build:
 
Caldercraft HM Cutter Sherbourne Kit Bash - Scale 1:64 - http://modelshipworl...64/#entry317289
 
!!!ON HOLD!!! Mantura/Sergal HMS President - Scale 1:60 - http://modelshipworl...760-sergal-160/
 
In the Pipeline:
 
18th Century Longboat - Scale 1;48 - - http://modelshipworl...ys-by-jonnyamy/
 
Completed Builds:
 
40 Foot Gaff Cutter - Solid Hull Concept Model
 
Caldercrafter HM Mortar Vessel Convulsion - Scale 1:64 - http://modelshipworl...on-by-jonnyamy/
 
SCRATCH BUILD - Vagabond 19 foot Sloop - Scale 1:20 - http://modelshipworl...ll/#entry302726


#33
jonny.amy

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I think I would also like to see a POF model of e.g. a British or French 6th Rate in a reasonable scale (1/64 or 1/48) available to buy in 3 "Modules": Bow, Midships and Stern. I'd suggest each section be similar in size and each module could be bought for sub $200, so that the work could be phased and planned to suit building a model of reasonable size. That way one could build a 28 gun Frigate without the masses of space required (for example a dedicated room/garage/hobby shop) and tools to build a a full POF model.

 

This would also allow each model to be sold by the manufacturer individually or as a bundle with a slight reduction in price, for example $200 each or $550 for "Modules A, B, & C".

 

Just a thought.... 


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Current Build:
 
Caldercraft HM Cutter Sherbourne Kit Bash - Scale 1:64 - http://modelshipworl...64/#entry317289
 
!!!ON HOLD!!! Mantura/Sergal HMS President - Scale 1:60 - http://modelshipworl...760-sergal-160/
 
In the Pipeline:
 
18th Century Longboat - Scale 1;48 - - http://modelshipworl...ys-by-jonnyamy/
 
Completed Builds:
 
40 Foot Gaff Cutter - Solid Hull Concept Model
 
Caldercrafter HM Mortar Vessel Convulsion - Scale 1:64 - http://modelshipworl...on-by-jonnyamy/
 
SCRATCH BUILD - Vagabond 19 foot Sloop - Scale 1:20 - http://modelshipworl...ll/#entry302726


#34
Barbossa

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Interesting topic.

Perhaps a bit theoretical but here's my request : 

 

How come there's so little of Jean Boudriot's work available in the kit market ?

Is this a legal or a copyright issue ?

 

Correct me if I'm wrong but I have only knowledge of "Le Chebec" released by Heller, a plastic kit , a few decades ago, I guess...

I'd love a 1/64 version of wonderful vessels such as La Vénus, La Renommée,...


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Kind regards

 

Christian

 

"Le mieux est l'ennemi du bien" (Voltaire)


#35
MrBlueJacket

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I am following this topic with all ears.

 

Nic


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#36
Bava

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I´d love to see some french frigates, too. La Forte or maybe La Virginie.

 

Or a danish one, they built beautiful vessels like Hohlenberg´s 24-pounder frigate Perlen of 1805:

 

Perlen.jpg

 

Another beauty, Schifter´s Galathea:

 

Unbenann1111t.jpg

 

Launched 1833 and made the first danish circumnavigation of the globe in the years 1846/47.


Edited by Bava, 03 June 2016 - 02:04 PM.

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#37
achuck49

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One more set of ideas.

 

Perhaps the following ideas could be of use.

 

To draw new builders into the hobby create a small series of ships that increase in difficulty.

 

The first model could be something like a 'row boat' or something similar.  Teaches how to setup false hull, simple planking, sand and paint.  What I really think would help is the inclusion of a DVD instructing what has to be done.

 

Second model a sail boat. Reinforces the first model, simple rigging, etc.  Include DVD

 

Third model something with a deck.  Include DVD

 

Final model, something similar to the 'Ranger' (cannot remember the maker).  Complex planking, deck, deck furniture, cannon (with rigging), rigging the ship and installation of sails.  Include DVD

 

I am not at all familiar with marketing, but if possible sell the first two models at places like Hobby Lobby, and other such chain stores.

 

Chuck A.


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#38
skipper1947

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Great topic.  As I visit the many websites of kit manufacturers and distributors I see an abundance of model of ships with sails.  I would like to see more kits of ships built after the golden age of sails.  The early steam ship era represents a large population of ships that would be interesting as models.  The first monitors, tugs, trawlers, riverboats, etc., would all be very interesting kits to build.

 

I am not a ship historian, but I think that the early steam era would provide some great models.

 

I second this opinion. :)  I would love to build a static model of one of those plumb bow yachts from the 1930s like the Bluebird of Chelsea; big, beautiful and in-your-face full of detail. I know there are scratch plans for her, but as a scratch builder, I make a good piano player (and I can't play the piano).

http://csmee.org.nz/...---bluebird.php

 

Skip


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#39
Captain Slog

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I would like to see more expedition type ships like Discovery, Investigator, Fram etc .

 

Also agree with a lot of people suggesting transition ships with sail and steam.

 

Cheers

Slog


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_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Current Build HM Bark Endeavour (First Wood)

Current Build Borodino (1:200 Card)

Abandoned Build Bismarck (Card)

Mazur D-350 (Card Vehicle - External site)


#40
HSM

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One thing I would like to see (and Chuck you already do it) is detailed pictures of what is being offered. When I am looking for cleats I see a list of 4mm, 5mm, 6mm, etc... or something similar. If there are no detailed photos or just a crude drawing or description I have no idea how good they really look or if I will be able to use them until they are delivered. Often I order anchors, belaying pins, carronades and cleats for a kit upgrade or a scratchbuild and end up with some grossly mis-shaped or out of scale.

 

Detailed pictures make the sale easy!


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From about as far from the ocean as you can get in North America!





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