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3-D Armenia by SalD – Hudson River Sidewheeler, 1847

Walking beam engine Steam

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60 replies to this topic

#21
_SalD_

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Very nice. Are you going to do a virtual tour of your model when done?

 

Thanks EJ,  I was thinking about doing that but at the moment I don't know how.  I'll need to do research on the subject.

 

I have little knowledge of this subject, but would the boiler also have two or three relief valves?

 

Wayne

 

Thanks Wayne,  I think the boiler has one large relief valve that I'm working on now.

 

 

Unfortunately during my active business time I never found someone who was able to describe the way of 3D design thinking in understandable way to me, vesa the "old"  three views drawings during my time of career. I believe the 3D design is a complete different approach in thinking is`nt it ?

 

Nils

 

Thanks Nils and I agree with you in that although 3D design drawings are nice and you can show the client a pretty picture you can't really building anything from them.  You still need simple 2D drawings showing plan views and elevations.  Maybe I'm too old fashion and that's why it took me 30 years to learn 3D.


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Sal

Connecticut Marine Model Society

Nautical Research Guild

 

Current

Armenia - Hudson River Sidewheeler, 1847 - 1st Scratch build 

3-D Armenia - AutoCAD model

 

Complete 

Second build - U.S. Brig Syren - Model Shipways

First Build - New York Pilot Boat 'Phantom' 1868 - Model Shipways


#22
Landlocked123

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Hi Sal,

I meant to ask when at the meeting, once you complete the CAD, are you going to build it with "sticks and bricks"?

Best,
John
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Member:
Connecticut Marine Model Society
Nautical Research Guild

#23
_SalD_

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Hi Sal,

I meant to ask when at the meeting, once you complete the CAD, are you going to build it with "sticks and bricks"?

Best,
John

 

Yes, that's the plan,  I figure it's easier to work out the kinks on the 3D model than the actual model.


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Sal

Connecticut Marine Model Society

Nautical Research Guild

 

Current

Armenia - Hudson River Sidewheeler, 1847 - 1st Scratch build 

3-D Armenia - AutoCAD model

 

Complete 

Second build - U.S. Brig Syren - Model Shipways

First Build - New York Pilot Boat 'Phantom' 1868 - Model Shipways


#24
_SalD_

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The next part I worked on was what I think is some sort of pressure relief valve in the main steam line from the boiler to the engine.  From the drawings it appears to be a weighted lever with a plunger type valve that if too much pressure builds up would be forced up allowing the steam to be bypassed to a blow off stack.   I’m not too sure what the purpose the block and tackle at the end would serve other than setting how far the plunger would need to rise before the steam was bypassed.

 

Original  drawing layout

 

RELIEFVALVE5.JPG

 

 

Modeled relief valve

 

RELIEFVALVE.JPG

 

 

Weighted lever.

 

RELIEFVALVE2.JPG

 

 

Block & Tackle  The rope in the blocks are just two separate lines, I haven't tried making realist looking rope reeved through the blocks yet (well, actually I tried but the results weren't pretty).

 

RELIEFVALVE1.JPG

 

 

Valve in place off of stack

 

RELIEFVALVE4.JPG


Edited by _SalD_, 27 September 2016 - 03:52 PM.

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Sal

Connecticut Marine Model Society

Nautical Research Guild

 

Current

Armenia - Hudson River Sidewheeler, 1847 - 1st Scratch build 

3-D Armenia - AutoCAD model

 

Complete 

Second build - U.S. Brig Syren - Model Shipways

First Build - New York Pilot Boat 'Phantom' 1868 - Model Shipways


#25
wrkempson

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I like your observation that the block and tackle would support the arm when pressure was below the relief setting.

 

Could the block and tackle also raise and then secure the valve in an open position so as to blow off steam quickly?  Perhaps in an emergency situation or if the boiler was being shut down?  Is the outside ball smaller (lighter) than the inside ball?  Perhaps this is the manner of making a fine adjustment to the valve, especially if the arm were calibrated on the opposite side.  

 

Again, great work on the 3D modeling.  Rope can be something of a bear to make until you get the hang of it (no pun). 

 

Wayne


Edited by wrkempson, 27 September 2016 - 06:25 PM.

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#26
_SalD_

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Wayne, thanks for looking and all good questions.  They probably did use the valve to blow off steam, bypassing the engine, for both reasons you mentioned.  I didn't notice until you asked but the outside ball does scale a bit smaller than the inside one.  I'm not sure if that was intended or if they were suppose to be equal.  It probably did work like an arm scale where the weights are movable to get the correct relief pressure they wanted. 

 

As for the rope, straight I can do, going around the sheave... a different story.


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Sal

Connecticut Marine Model Society

Nautical Research Guild

 

Current

Armenia - Hudson River Sidewheeler, 1847 - 1st Scratch build 

3-D Armenia - AutoCAD model

 

Complete 

Second build - U.S. Brig Syren - Model Shipways

First Build - New York Pilot Boat 'Phantom' 1868 - Model Shipways


#27
druxey

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I agree with Wayne's assessment, that the tackle could be used to blow off steam when required, by-passing the relief. Two single blocks would be sufficient.


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#28
_SalD_

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Two single blocks would be sufficient.

 

Good point druxey, how's this..

 

RELIEFVALVE6.JPG


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Sal

Connecticut Marine Model Society

Nautical Research Guild

 

Current

Armenia - Hudson River Sidewheeler, 1847 - 1st Scratch build 

3-D Armenia - AutoCAD model

 

Complete 

Second build - U.S. Brig Syren - Model Shipways

First Build - New York Pilot Boat 'Phantom' 1868 - Model Shipways


#29
WackoWolf

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That looks nice, I like that better.


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Wacko
Joe :D

Go MSW :) :)

#30
_SalD_

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I started working on the walking beam engine by first modeling the walking beam.  The dimensions were taken by scaling the drawing.

 

FRAME.JPG

 

Building the model laying flat

 

BEAM.JPG

 

 

BEAM2.JPG

 

Nice thing about 3D models is that you can build parts in any order and put them in place.

 

BEAM3.JPG

 

 

Next I modeled the support frame for the beam based on the drawing dimensions.

 

Bearings at the top of the frame that supports the beam.

 

BEARING.JPG

 

The main vertical members are 12”x12” timber.  For the bracing tie rods I used 1 ½” diameter rods.

 

FRAME2.JPG

 

FRAME3.JPG

 

beam in frame, still need to add the main support shaft.

 

FRAME4.JPG

 

 

As a side note I made a little virtual walkthrough around the relief valve that I posted but you couldn't play it, so I deleted it.  I guess you can’t post videos here.


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Sal

Connecticut Marine Model Society

Nautical Research Guild

 

Current

Armenia - Hudson River Sidewheeler, 1847 - 1st Scratch build 

3-D Armenia - AutoCAD model

 

Complete 

Second build - U.S. Brig Syren - Model Shipways

First Build - New York Pilot Boat 'Phantom' 1868 - Model Shipways


#31
EJ_L

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Nice work! I love all the little details you have been including. They make for a much more incredible ship and like you said, the nice thing about modeling in 3D is that you are not trapped by physics in your build. You can add, remove and place anything, anywhere at anytime.

 

I don't think you can post videos directly here but if you upload them to YouTube, you can link them to your posts that way. I have seen many posts done that way.


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"Anchors Aweigh"

-E.J.

 

Current Builds - La Couronne - Corel &  Le Soleil Royal - Sergal

Completed - Wood - Rattlesnake - Model Shipways, HMS Bounty - Constructo

                      Plastic - USS Constitution - Revel (twice), Cutty Sark.

Unfinished - Plastic - HMS Victory - Heller, Sea Witch.

Member : Nautical Research Guild

 

 


#32
_SalD_

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Thanks EJ, now I have something else new to learn...posting to you tube :)


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Sal

Connecticut Marine Model Society

Nautical Research Guild

 

Current

Armenia - Hudson River Sidewheeler, 1847 - 1st Scratch build 

3-D Armenia - AutoCAD model

 

Complete 

Second build - U.S. Brig Syren - Model Shipways

First Build - New York Pilot Boat 'Phantom' 1868 - Model Shipways


#33
wrkempson

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I had a hard time knowing what I was looking at on the drawing of the beam.  This link has a clearer drawing from an engineering book of 1891.

 

https://books.google...engines&f=false

 

Scroll down to see your style of beam. 

 

This beam is of a truss design and is made in two pieces, the inner skeleton frame which is cast in one piece and the outer strap which is forged in one piece.  At either end of the strap are the "journals" for receiving the piston and driving rods.  The "journal" for the air pump is cast into the skeleton.  The strap is held to the frame by "gudgeons."  

 

The illustration in the link above shows the skeleton is thicker in the center.

 

I'm sure this is known to you, but it was a pleasant time for me to track this down, so I thought I would share it with others like me for whom this project is presenting an entirely new field of knowledge.

 

Wayne


Edited by wrkempson, 03 October 2016 - 09:43 PM.

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#34
_SalD_

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Wayne, thanks for the reference.  I always enjoy studying the old engineering reference books, they're so much more simplified than today's text books since it was all hand calculations and not the pages and pages of computer generated calculations.

 

I thought the beam must have been made in different pieces but just wasn't sure how it was pieced together.  Your reference and explanation helps a lot.

 

I took a few pictures of the walking beam on the Ticonderoga at the Shelbrune Museum in Vermont this past summer, now it makes more sense.

 

IMG_3157.JPG

IMG_3158.JPG

IMG_3159.JPG  


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Sal

Connecticut Marine Model Society

Nautical Research Guild

 

Current

Armenia - Hudson River Sidewheeler, 1847 - 1st Scratch build 

3-D Armenia - AutoCAD model

 

Complete 

Second build - U.S. Brig Syren - Model Shipways

First Build - New York Pilot Boat 'Phantom' 1868 - Model Shipways


#35
WackoWolf

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Thanks for the pictures.


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Wacko
Joe :D

Go MSW :) :)

#36
_SalD_

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After the frame I started work on the engine’s connecting rods and please forgive me if I don’t use the correct terminology for some of these parts as I’m not a machinist or ME, so please, feel free to correct me.

 

The first one is the braced connecting rod that links the walking beam to the paddlewheel crank. This wrought iron rod is approximately 30’ long by 10” in diameter and is stiffened at its midsection by supplementary rods which bear against braces affixed to its midsection.

 

CONNECTINGROD1.JPG

 

The bearings were of the plain type and made of brass or bronze.  The bearing would be adjusted by means of tapered gibs.  What I’m not too sure of is the function of the two brass fitting shown on top of the bearings that you can see in the pictures I took of the Tiaconderoga’s connecting rods (previous post).  I’m thinking they’re some kind of grease fitting to lubricate the bearings. Not sure of their name.

 

CONNECTINGROD2.JPG

 

The next set of connecting rods are located at the other end of the walking beam and connect the beam to the crosshead which connects to the piston rod of the engine.  These rods are roughly 10’-6” long and 6” in diameter.

 

CONNECTINGROD3.JPG

 

Crosshead guide which sits on top of the engine's cylinder and is braced back to the frame.

 

connecting rod guide.JPG

 

Crosshead guide with connecting rods.

 

CONNECTINGROD10.JPG

 

The next set of connecting rods are for the air pump.  These two slimmer rods are connected to the beam close to its quarter point.

 

CONNECTINGROD5.JPG

 

All rods in place.

 

CONNECTINGROD11.JPG

CONNECTINGROD9.JPG


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Sal

Connecticut Marine Model Society

Nautical Research Guild

 

Current

Armenia - Hudson River Sidewheeler, 1847 - 1st Scratch build 

3-D Armenia - AutoCAD model

 

Complete 

Second build - U.S. Brig Syren - Model Shipways

First Build - New York Pilot Boat 'Phantom' 1868 - Model Shipways


#37
wrkempson

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Beautiful. You have modeled everything except the grease. Well done!

Wayne
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#38
_SalD_

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Thanks Wayne. I started this 3D model to help me build a scratch model of her but I think I've gotten a little carried away.  Some of the parts I'm detailing I could probably never replicate because of their size but it's fun to do and I am learning a few new things. 


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Sal

Connecticut Marine Model Society

Nautical Research Guild

 

Current

Armenia - Hudson River Sidewheeler, 1847 - 1st Scratch build 

3-D Armenia - AutoCAD model

 

Complete 

Second build - U.S. Brig Syren - Model Shipways

First Build - New York Pilot Boat 'Phantom' 1868 - Model Shipways


#39
hexnut

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Thanks Wayne. I started this 3D model to help me build a scratch model of her but I think I've gotten a little carried away.  Some of the parts I'm detailing I could probably never replicate because of their size but it's fun to do and I am learning a few new things. 

Really nice work Sal! 

 

As far as making the physical parts, working as you are in the same size as your intended physical model is a huge advantage, as it allows you to start "distorting" some elements to size them to common stock, whether wood, brass, or model railroad-type (Grandt Line, Titchy Train, Archer, etc...) scale nuts and bolts, then sorting the remaining parts into turnings, photo-etch, 3-D prints, building a B.O.M. as you go...just as if you hadn't retired! :)

 

Of course making a 3-d model of Armenia "as built" is pretty awesome in of itself, I'm really enjoying watching this.


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#40
Landlocked123

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HI Bob,

Where have you been? We miss you at CMMS.

Best,
John
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