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Miniature Hand Tools


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47 replies to this topic

#21
Gaetan Bordeleau

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I  agree with Roger 3/8 in surely not miniature chisel even if you have a miniature handle.

I do not think that this kind of chisel is a good choice, even if it would be done with high quality steel.

 

The reason is very simple and it is exactly the same thing as choosing a scale for modeling. The bigger the scale, the easier will be the construction.

The video shows a perfect example of the principle: the guy is holding the chisel with 2 fingers. He would have much more control if he could use all the 5 fingers of the hand on a bigger handle.

 

So what you need is a small width of steel and a big handle.


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#22
Janet B

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Janet B,

               THE PLANE IS A GREAT TOOL,I ALSO PURCHASED SOME FRENCH CURVES MADE OF S/STEEL


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#23
Mike Y

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Roger, these chisels are used a bit differently - shaving and cutting the wood with a finger pressure, not with the mallet. Due to their size, they are much easier to work with comparing to the full size chisels - which are just too long. I have both fullsize and miniature chisels, and haven't used the fullsize ones on the model for a while.
Might be subjective though. ;)

Edited by Mike Y, 19 December 2016 - 07:58 AM.

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#24
michael mott

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So what you need is a small width of steel and a big handle.

On this point Gaetan, I have to agree and disagree. I think that this all depends on the particular task at hand, I remember that on a small half hull (7 inches long) I needed a narrow very long chisel. and sometimes I need a very small and short one.

 

Michael


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Current builds  Bristol Pilot Cutter 1:8

 

                                Skipjack 19 foot Launch 1:8

 

                               Herreshoff Buzzards Bay 14 1:8

 

Other projects  Pilot Cutter 1:500

 

                         Maria, Sloop 1:2

 

Restoration      A Bassett Lowke steamship Albertic 1:100

 

Anything you can imagine is possible, when you put your mind to it.


#25
Gaetan Bordeleau

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 Michael you are right both can be use for different tasks.

 

What I meant is that for a 1/8'' chisel by example, you will have more control with all your hand instead of 2 fingers only.


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#26
Jack12477

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I have the entire set of Veritas/Lee Valley miniature planes, chisels, scrapers. The only tool I have not used yet is the scraper. The low angle block plane gets the most use, especially on planking strips and for smoothing the hull and deck after planking. The tiny chisels are good as MikeY pointed out for tight places where only figure pressure is needed.  For something that looks like a toy or something to display on a shelf these tools are amazingly functional right out of the box with no additional sharpening/honing needed.

 

I still use the full sized versions but for model work these are fantastic IMO.


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Jack
 
"No one is as smart as all of us"
---------------------------------------------

Current build: MS Willie L Bennett
Completed build log(s): MS 18th Century Longboat , AL Marie Jeanne
Gallery: AL Swift , AL Armed Virginia Sloop, AL Santisima Trinidad Captain's Launch , 18th Century Longboat , AL Marie Jeanne
In dry-dock: AL 1798 US Constellation,  MS Picket Boat,  Dumas Donzi Z65 Tournament Fisherman (R/C)

Other: 1912 Hudson River Ice Yacht Manhasset - RESTORATION - Scale = Full Size, Relief Carving for Model Ships


#27
robnbill

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You guys convinced me. I have a set of the chisels on order.
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Bill

Chantilly, VA

 

Current Build: Scratch Build Brig Eagle

 

Completed Build Log: USS Constitution - Mamoli

Completed Build Gallery: USS Constitution - Mamoli

 


#28
WackoWolf

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I now have everything except the scraper which I doubt I will order since something like that I make my self for the work at hand. I just got the chisels yesterday, the planes I have gotten from Lee Valley some time back and they work just as good as the day I got them. Like any tool you take care of them and keep them sharp they will do what you got them for, and yes they do look cool.


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Wacko
Joe :D

Go MSW :) :)

#29
robnbill

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Okay, I ordered the plane set as well. Damn you guys!
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Bill

Chantilly, VA

 

Current Build: Scratch Build Brig Eagle

 

Completed Build Log: USS Constitution - Mamoli

Completed Build Gallery: USS Constitution - Mamoli

 


#30
Roger Pellett

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For me, the two fingered holding approach would be difficult. In general, tools with larger handles are better for me as I have lost some strength in my hands due to a complex health problem and maybe just getting older.

The attached photo shows a set of miniature spoke shaves that I do find useful. They are gripped between the thumb and forefinger- both hands and pushed or pulled. I bought them in 1965'after seeing them used by professional model builders at the University of Michigan''s Naval Architecture Towing Tank. I believe that the set cost less than $5. They are no longer available new but occasionally show up on EBay. I made the simple aluminum fixture ho hold the small blades in my honing guile.

Roger

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Edited by Roger Pellett, 19 December 2016 - 07:39 PM.

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#31
Mike Y

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How do you use the spokeshaves in this hobby, if not a secret? They are designed to make some round and curved shapes, right? But I can hardly find parts in the model where a spokeshave can be used.. Or I totally miss the idea?


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#32
grsjax

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Spoke shaves are good for working on spars and other long thin sections.  Use them for doing the initial shaping before finishing with scraper and sandpaper.


Edited by grsjax, 19 December 2016 - 09:49 PM.

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My advice and comments are always worth what you paid for them.


#33
Roger Pellett

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My models are generally built from laminated lifts layed up from buttocks. I build two half models and then put them together using pre drilled locator pegs to ensure accurate alignment. I have built one plank on frame model, the NY pilot boat Express using the Hahn method but the rest of my models have carved hulls. The plank on bulkhead method does not appeal to me.

The little spokeshaves are perfect for carving and fairing these models.

Roger
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#34
Landlocked123

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How about some pictures of the models Roger? Best. J.
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Member:
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Nautical Research Guild

#35
Julie Mo

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Good point, Roger.  I never even looked at the widths.  It seems their only real advantage is being able to get into tight spots. 

 

However, if you don't own chisels in those widths this would be an inexpensive way to get them.  The same width chisels in their full size versions would run you $234.00 US, as opposed to $39.50 for the mini chisels.


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Endeavour - 1934 American's Cup, UK Challenger, J-Class - Amati 1:35


#36
Roger Pellett

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OK J,

Here are two of my models, US Navy 40 Ft 1900 Standard 40ft Steam Cutter and a US Navy Standard 26 ft Motor Whaleboat. Both models are scratch built to 1:32 scale. The figures are purchased 54mm military figures that I painted.

Roger

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#37
Kurt J

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Realy nice!!!
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#38
Landlocked123

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Very nice Roger. Thanks! Best, John
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Member:
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#39
probablynot

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Those Veritas chisels.  I was given a set of them last Christmas, after I'd seen them advertised and added them to my Christmas wish list.
I've never used them.
Well OK, I've played with them occasionally, when a task turned up that looked suitable for them.  But in every case I found that conventional tools (or even a simple razor blade) did the job better and quicker.
I still keep them in my workshop, but I can only regard them as scale models.  Toys, really.

In my view, Palm chisels are much better for almost every job that the Veritas chisels could be called upon to do.  They're mainly intended for carving, and come in many profiles including flat.  These Narex palm chisels are more convenient to hold, and can be used with greater accuracy.  Plus, they work well as turning gouges on miniature woodturning lathes.


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Brian

Current project: - Constructo "Silhouet" 1893 (Dutch barge) http://modelshipworl...constructo-160/

Some previous builds - HMS Bounty Launch [Model Shipways kit] http://modelshipworl...s-116-smallish/

Corel's Half Moon (lightly 'bashed')  http://modelshipworl...scale-150-wood/

A 1:12 scratch-build of 'Anastasia', my old sailing kayak from back in the 1940s. http://modelshipworl...by-probablynot-a-18-re-build-of-my-1949-kayak/

Next project: - I'm thinking.   Might be Victory Models' HMS Fly.  A pretty ship - miles of rigging ...


#40
druxey

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Lovely work, Roger!


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