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USS Tennessee


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30 replies to this topic

#21
Canute

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Interesting stuff. The screw sloops are an area needing more study..

 

P.S. The Deadheads were the overall name for fans and followers of the Grateful Dead, a psychedelic era fusion rock band of the 60's thru 90s. Great jam band. Usually applied to the group who followed the band from show to show.


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Ken

 

Started: MS Bounty Longboat,

On Hold:  Heinkel USS Choctaw paper

Down the road: Shipyard HMC Alert 1/96 paper, Mamoli Constitution Cross, MS USN Picket Boat #1

Scratchbuild: Echo Cross Section

 

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#22
Keith Black

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 Thank you Talos, that's very kind of you. 

 If you notice in the closeup photo I posted, the inside rails have vertical alternating types of wood, light and dark. This is purely a decorative feature and in no way represents the actual Tennessee. This would have been a real pain in the behind to do for decoration purposes only unless the builder was trying to enhance an area in which they limited amount of knowledge if any. "If I can't make it accurate, I'll make it fancy" and if this is in fact a souvenir, then "fancy" probably found a more willing market........KB


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#23
Keith Black

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Ken

 The screw frigate USS Wampanoag (renamed the USS Florida on May 15th, 1869, the same day the Tennessee was renamed) is another interesting example from that era.   https://en.wikipedia...mpanoag_(1864) 

 I'm amazed at the brevity of service of these ships. It had to be a costly period for not just the US, but navies around the globe as all were going from sail to mechanical driven vessels.

 I bet it was good business to be a scrapper during this period. The scrapyards is another area that would be fun and interesting to explore in detail........KB


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#24
Keith Black

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I know I have the space to create one top deck companionway to the lower deck. How would you guys go about representing the opening without cutting into the deck? Paint a flat black rectangle the size of the opening and be done with it?..........KB


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#25
tlevine

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You mentioned initially that you are restoring this model.  Now you are talking about changing the model to match a known ship.  Looking at the model in question, I believe it was never meant to be an accurate scale model of any specific ship.  It is a souvenir or folk art model, probably made in the Far East.  If this is a restoration, then do just that...restore it to how it was when purchased, regardless of accuracy.  I am in the process of doing the same thing for a friend who wants his deceased father's clipper ship model restored.  You will learn valuable skills which could be used on a future, historically accurate model.  If your intention is to create an accurate representation of Tennessee then the only thing you might be able to save is the hull.  I do not mean to put a damper on your enthusiasm but you will find that this is a big project and I would hate to see you abandon it because it is more complicated than you expected initially.


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Toni


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Current Build:  HMS Atalanta-1775 - 1:48 scale

Completed Build: Longboat by tlevine - 1:48 scale
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#26
Keith Black

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Toni

 The name, USS Tennessee, was written on paper (very small printing) and glued to both sides of the bow and maybe the stern. The bow for sure, the stern was illegible but a paper label was there. I'm 100% sure it's a representation of the Tennessee, just not a very accurate one thus the thoughts about it being a possible souvenir.

 I'm not changing it to be a particular ship as that's already determined, it's a model of the steam frigate USS Tennessee. What I am doing is making necessary replacements to scale that match the hull and mast. Instead of reproducing lost cannon to an inaccurate scale, I'm taking the cannon from the original lower deck ports, putting them in the correct scale carriage and placing them topside. Two of the three hatches covers have been lost. Instead of coping the hatch type that remains twice and duplicate another inaccuracy, why not make three correct hatch covers and remove the remaining inaccurate one? And if I'm going to remove the one remaining hatch cover, why not try to create at least one (if not two) companionway to the lower deck?  

 If I were 100% positive this model was a US made piece of folk art, i wouldn't have done anything to it except replace the rigging. But I don't believe that to be the case. Folk art is simple (we live in a 150 year old house surrounded with antiques and folk art) please note the close up picture and note the inside of the rails. That isn't simple by any means, hence my shying away from it being  a "folk art" piece.

 But as a stated earlier, this had become a toy in it's later life. Pieces were broken (I've fixed the majority of those) and pieces (not just one or two) went missing.

 I turn 70 in March, I have patience. I love history, I love to create, I love to restore things (a hobby from another life was restoring prewar English and American sports cars) I love to piddle away while my cat sleeps in the chair next to me. I've made the commitment to finish this project, if I'm unable to do so it will be because my ship has sailed, literally.

 Thank you for your concern, I appreciate that. Don't fear putting a damper on my enthusiasm, I've got about two hundred hours in this project thus far, I've got another six to nine months of work to do before I'm able to start rigging. I've never rigged a ship before so I'll need lots of help when I reach that stage. And I'm a realist. 

 Again, thank you Toni..........KB


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#27
Roger Pellett

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Volume 1 of Canney's "Old Steam Navy" has material on Tennessee and her predessor Madawasca including a lines drawing. The hull of this model bears little resemblance to the hull of the actual ship. It would seem that the builder of the model had a distorted perspective of the actual vessel like some of the early paintings of Western warships by Japanese artists.

Roger
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#28
Keith Black

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 Hey Roger, thanks a ton for the heads up on the book! I've bookmarked it and plan on ordering shortly.

 I agree with your assessment of the hull, another foot would help tremendously. Unless you've seen something I haven't, the basic hull and funnel configuration of the model matches only that of the Tennessee. At least that's my thought having researched all the US steam frigates and matching them against the model. Believe me when I say I tried very hard to find another one that made more sense.

 I've owned this model for slightly over four years and I did a lot of looking before I started the restoration process in ernest. Another fly in the ointment, the Tennessee underwent several refits. Do photographs exist that were taken after each refit? I hope the answer (or least some of the answer) is provided in Vol 1.

 Thank you again for the info on the book..........KB



#29
Roger Pellett

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Kieth

I'm not doubting that it is a model of the Tennessee. I think that the builder had no idea what the hull actually looked like.

The book includes quite a bit of text regarding this class of high speed cruisers, their condemnation by the Navy and the rebirth of some of them as large, slower frigates. Specifically, the book includes a lines drawing and inboard profile of the Tennessee. It does not include refit by refit photos.

Roger
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#30
Keith Black

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Roger

 Thank you again.........KB


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#31
Keith Black

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 A huge "thank you" to each who provided information, pictures, and links. That's why I came, mission completed and successful. If someone would remove the "Steam frigate USS Tennessee" topic from the scratch build section I'd appreciate it. I'll not insult the fantastic, unbelievable work done by the members of this guild with a restoration log of my misshapen halfling.  :)  That's not hurt feelings speaking, that's the respect I have for your abilities as a community............Keith


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