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H.M.S. Leopard by JerseyCity Frankie - scratch built solid hull


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18 replies to this topic

#1
JerseyCity Frankie

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Solid basswood hull. Scribed deck of painted styrene with styrene deck pillars and bulwarks. I am nearly finished with this model now but I started it nearly four years ago! There were some other projects I dabbled in that took me away from the Leopard.

Attached Thumbnails

  • hull rabet.jpg
  • hull with insert.jpg

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#2
JerseyCity Frankie

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H.M.S. Leopard is another actual ship that was used by author Patrick O’Brian as a vessel for his characters to have an adventure on, but it only appears in one of his novels, Desolation Island. I only chose the subject after I purchased the book The 50 Gun Ship by Rif Winfield, which has some really nice, large, fold out plans of the ship. I wish there were more books like this one, with a set of  quality plans in an envelope in the back of the book. It’s a throwback to the days of Longridge.

Attached Thumbnails

  • quarter gallery.jpg
  • Leopard hullhand.jpg

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#3
JerseyCity Frankie

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More planked boats. If you read my build log for H.M.S. Sophie you already heard me encouraging you to try planking a boat this way, with paper strips. The look you get is really hard to beat and the process of planking once you already have the wooden form is very easy.

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  • boat lasts.jpg

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#4
JerseyCity Frankie

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Once again I wish I had more photos to flesh out the steps that I took to reach this stage, but I had data all over the place when a previous laptop died on me and I had to go searching on an external hard drive. The lesson is not only to back up your data but also LABEL IT SO YOU CAN FIND IT AGAIN LATER. I took this photo last night (April 21st 2013) and it shows the deck furniture and boats in place, the lower spars up to the topmasts with their shrouds ( built off the model) The ratlins are fly-fishing fly tying thread, the smallest stuff I could find. The details of the timberheads rails and belfry are cut from laminated red art paper. Coils are made on a two pin jig off the model.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Beakhead-Bulkhead.jpg

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#5
JerseyCity Frankie

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I love rigging best. I plan to have her on the Port tack with t'galents and staysails set. Getting the cours sails to look clewed up was a pain. I tried a few different techniques and settled on tissue paper soaked in thinned white glue and manipulated while partially set. I had tried and rejected using foil bent then painted- it looked too much like foil. I'm sure I spent more time on these sails than I did on some of the more difficult looking tasks.

Attached Thumbnails

  • latest-leopard.jpg
  • lowers.jpg
  • lifts.jpg

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#6
michael mott

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Wow! that look super.

 

Michael


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Current builds  Bristol Pilot Cutter 1:8

 

                                Skipjack 19 foot Launch 1:8

 

                               Herreshoff Buzzards Bay 14 1:8

 

Other projects  Pilot Cutter 1:500

 

                         Maria, Sloop 1:2

 

Restoration      A Bassett Lowke steamship Albertic 1:100

 

Anything you can imagine is possible, when you put your mind to it.


#7
SailorGreg

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A little gem! Without your hand in the picture I had assumed the model was at least twice as big as it actually is. Lovely work.

Greg

#8
dafi

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Nicely done!

 

What is the scale?

 

Daniel


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By the Deep 17 http://modelshipworl...-display/page-4

 

SMS Trinkstein http://modelshipworl...navy/#entry3314

 

See also our german forum for Sailing Ship Modeling and History: http://www.segelschiffsmodellbau.com/

 

 

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#9
hopeful

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Am enjoying your build. Very interesting. How did you do the ratlines?
 

BFN 
Hopeful aka David



#10
JerseyCity Frankie

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Hi Daniel. The scale is weird. I'm building a selection of ships under the command of the fictional Jack Aubrey from the  Patrick O'Brian novels. The first one I built was H.M.S. Surprise and my intention was to fit it into a shadow box that would live on my bookshelf. So I held my two hands apart at about the width I wanted the hull of the Surprise to be and built her to that odd scale, which was one inch equals seventeen feet.

Hi David. The shrouds were built on a jig off the model. Shrouds were carpet thread and the ratlins were fly tying thread. Picture a small plank with the triangular shape of the shrouds drawn in and the shrouds pinned over it. Parallel with and outside of  the shrouds I had a length of double sided tape. I ran each corse of ratline athwart the shrouds and spaced evenly, pressing their the ends into the tape off the edge to hold it in place, then I hit each juncture with cyano. I have heard that a coat of shellack will glue this sort of arrangement together nicely but I have never tried that. Its difficult to get ALL the junctures to stick together and I had a lot of tidying up to do policing up the loose ends.


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#11
JerseyCity Frankie

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Should I have put the buntlines on? Probably not, the smallest stuff I have is what you see there, its fly tying thread, and it has its faults. But on the other hand if I have included them it adds to the texture of things.

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  • lifts-and-bunts.jpg

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#12
JerseyCity Frankie

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This is the main topsail being made. Its printer paper. I started by drawing the panel lines on each side of the paper, trying to get them to match one side to the other. Then I painted/stained the paper the brownish grey color you see here using thinned acrylic paint and let it dry. I wanted the paint to be uneven so that one pice cut from one side of the paper wouldn't quite match with a pice cut from another part of the same sheet. I cut the paper into pieces a bit larger than the sail I was making and then wet each side of the paper with thinned white glue, and draped the wet paper over a large ceramic bowel. I did what I could to get the paper to sit on the surface of the bowel without wrinkles, and forced it dry with a hair dryer. Next I cut long thin strips of the same paper and glued them on as tableings and reef bands. I drew the reef points on with a mechanical pencil. Cut to the proper size and shape. Meanwhile I had been turning spars made from bamboo skewers, also painted/stained with thinned acrylic paint. I put on a long tightly spiraled thread to represent the robands. The footropes were a pain in the *** but essential. They are made of the black fly tying thread. I put a pice of glass over my sail plan and taped the spars over the drawings of the spars and did my best to follow the location of the footropes and stirrups. The glass resists the glue. Finally i glued the spars and sails together.

Attached Thumbnails

  • sails-prep-one.jpg
  • sails-prep-two.jpg
  • sails-prep-three.jpg

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#13
JerseyCity Frankie

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canvas-aloft.jpg I have been adding more canvas as I near completion on the Leopard. I have also been building a case for her and planning how the display will look. I forget when I started work on this model, it was several years ago and she sat ignored for much of that time as other projects came and went. As I look critically at the work I did on the hull a few years ago I now find flaws I am unhappy I have to live with. I am not too good at deciding on a level of detail and sticking with it, here near the end of the build I find myself wishing I worked a bit harder at making things on the hull. I have gone back and worked on the decorations aft though, even though at one point I had decided it was ‘good enough”. Last year I got a copy of Building a Miniature Navy Board Model by Philip Reed and his incredible work in that book inspired me to go back and add the allegorical figures on my Leopard’s stern. They have torso’s and head’s cut from pieces of card stock with limbs made of painted and bent thread or very thin string. Reed uses gesso to flesh out his carvings but I just globed on white glue and let it dry and painted it. Nobody I know has produced work like Reed has done and I encourage everyone to get his books, they are full of hundreds of good color photos and he gives a lot of tips and practical advice any model builder could use.

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • main-topsail.jpg
  • stern.jpg

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#14
Bluto 1790

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Hi J.C. Frankie,

I've just found this thread of yours. Great build !
In your first few posts I didn't realise how small the scale is until I saw your hand in one of the photos. It looks like an excellent build as it's such a small scale.

I hope my Leopard will look something as good as yours when it's finished, although I've no idea when that may be. I've already been at it for almost 3 years (with some lengthy lay-off periods) and it's not even half-way there yet. Mine is at a scale of 1:80 so it's a few times bigger than yours . . . but it's still a challenge!
  • JerseyCity Frankie likes this

Jim.

 

Education is important . . . but Model Ship Building is importanter.

 

 

Current (and only) build: HMS Leopard 1790; scratch build 1:80 PoB


#15
mtaylor

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Frankie,

 

This some seriously impressive work.  I can't imagine trying to do a 50-gun ship that small.  Have you made any more progress?


Mark

"The shipwright is slow, but the wood is patient." - me


Current Build:

Licorne - 1755 from Hahn Plans (Scratch) Version 2.0

Past Builds:
Triton Cross-Section
USS Constellaton (kit bashed to 1854 Sloop of War (Gallery) Build Log
Wasa (Gallery)


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#16
JerseyCity Frankie

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My model of H.M.S. Leopard is complete. I didn't have many photos from the last stages of her construction buut here is a shot of her t'galent shrouds being installed. Since were on the subject, its always disturbed me a little bit to see that most references show no evidence of ratlines on the t'galent shrouds. I know its a light spar and I suppose some very fit sailors could climb up to the truck without ratlines, I still find it odd. On the other hand I'm really pleased I don't need to include any more ratlines than I have already labored over. When I set up some decent lighting I'm going to lavishly photograph my Leopard and I will soon have the shots up in the completed scratch built ship section.

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  • tgalentshrouds.jpg

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#17
JerseyCity Frankie

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So this is odd:There was another page for this build log of my completed HMS Leopard model and now it is gone. I know the mods had remove the comments of some jerk who posted a curious ad hominem attack on the last page but my recollection was that the rest of the log was intact. Oh well, I will take the time one day to put up the photos of the completed model. Better to have removed the "I stopped taking my meds" comments the guy had put up and the photos with them than to keep the comments intact.


Edited by JerseyCity Frankie, 04 February 2016 - 03:03 PM.

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#18
Bart616

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Great work, very nice detail. I would love to see some more detail on how you make the ships boats with the paper strips.

 

Also just FYI, the Leopard makes its first appearance in The Mauritius Command.  I only know this because I am reading the books for a second time and I am on this book now.  Jack is told he may be getting a few more ships for his squadron, the Iphigenia and Magicienne and  " The old Leopard, too, though nobody wants her: iron-sick throughout, a real graveyard ship. 



#19
JerseyCity Frankie

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Yah, O'Brian never misses an opportunity to have a character refer to her only as "The horrible old Leopard". There is a point in one of the novels where they describe the 2" thick mold growing on her timbers below deck! She is mentioned again when Maturins sea chest is being hoisted aboard by a crew that doesn't realize he has any sea time, they are treating him like a landlubber until they see a mark on his sea chest that shows he was crew on Leopard, then they show him some respect.


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