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H.M.S. Triton Cross Section by Long9Ron - Scale 1:48


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146 replies to this topic

#21
Boccherini

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Ron,

great diy thicknesser, better than my Heath-Robinson model. Take regular breaks from the scroll saw, it'll save your neck.

 

Grant.



#22
Long9Ron

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Snowmans

As far as the masking tape goes. I hope it will work without tearing. I placed glue on the masking tape and then after placing the templates I smeared another layer over the templates and let them dry over night and a day. So will will see if it works. I will let you know.

 

Pete38 and Bob

The thickness sander worked good until the drum broke under all that sanding. Had to build a better drum and used my DIY Homemade lathe to turn the drum down. It worked great also. Should work good for turning my pillars and such.

 

Grant

Just pick up a used Craftsman Scroll Saw (16") today for $35.00. Going to clean it up and put a new blade in it and try it out on some sample pieces before I cut out the frame pieces. I think that would be a great idea first. Will let you know how it works later.


  • timh likes this

Ron

 

 

Current Build: H.M.S. Triton Cross Section 1:48

 

Why is it that I always find out the best way to do something is after I have already done it the wrong way? - Me

 

 


#23
Tim C

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Ron

Nice buy on the sears jig saw.

Several folks like rubber cement to hold down the frame paper while cutting, cleans up easy.

 

Later 42rocker


Edited by 42rocker, 09 March 2013 - 04:43 AM.

Current Build -- Finishing a 1:1 House that I've been building for a while

Current Build -- Triton Cross Section


#24
russ

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Rubber cement is a good idea. It is really easy to clean up and it dos not distort the patterns. The paper peels off and what is left can be rubbed off either with your fingers or, if it is really on there tough, then an eraser will work.

 

What bothers me about the paper glue is that it looks like typical PVA glue and that can distort the patterns. Please be careful that the individual shapes are not distorted in any way.

 

Russ



#25
Long9Ron

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42rocker and Russ

 

Thanks for the great tip. I will have to give that a try in the future. Too late to change it over right now. I was very careful when I put in on not to distort and of the frame paper. I will be cutting them out tomorrow and will update you as to how it went. Any particular brand of rubber cement to use? 


Ron

 

 

Current Build: H.M.S. Triton Cross Section 1:48

 

Why is it that I always find out the best way to do something is after I have already done it the wrong way? - Me

 

 


#26
Tim C

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Ron

Any, just make sure that it's not dry in the can when you buy it. Yes, it happens. I got my last good stuff at a drafting/print shop. Did get some on sale one time at a big name craft shop, now you know how I know about dried out in the can, good sale price.. Spread out the rubber cement, best fresh. No lumps.

 

Later 42rocker


Current Build -- Finishing a 1:1 House that I've been building for a while

Current Build -- Triton Cross Section


#27
russ

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I usually get the Elmer's brand and have never had a problem with it. Once it has been opened, it does have a shelf life, but mine usually lasts the better part of a year. Climate may play a part in that, though.

 

Russ



#28
mtaylor

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You can also buy Rubber Cement Thinner which wiill reconstitute the cement if starts drying out.  It is, shall we say, nasty stuff.  Keep away from flames and use in a well-ventilated area.


Mark

"The shipwright is slow, but the wood is patient." - me


Current Build:

Licorne - 1755 from Hahn Plans (Scratch) Version 2.0

Past Builds:
Triton Cross-Section
USS Constellaton (kit bashed to 1854 Sloop of War (Gallery) Build Log
Wasa (Gallery)


Member of the Nautical Research Guild


#29
rummy

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Very nice work Ron.I think you will have a beautiful build.   Larry


With Age Comes Wisdom,I'm Still Waiting!

 

Current Builds:Syren.Triton Cross section.

Completed Builds: Virginia by AL

                           King of the Mississippi by AL

                           Constellation by AL


#30
Long9Ron

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Thanks Larry for the kind words. 

 

I have been busy again in the garage, cutting and sanding and building frames. Have to make a Zero insert for the Scroll Saw. I found out that with the way it is the wood will chip on the ends, due to not enough support under the wood piece. Learn as you go. 

 

Attached File  2013-03-09 10.33.17.jpg   65.36KB   0 downloads

 

Attached File  2013-03-10 12.54.36.jpg   55.19KB   0 downloads

 

 

This is a picture of my very first frame. It turned out okay, but I think I could have done better.

 

Attached File  2013-03-11 11.44.41.jpg   68.54KB   0 downloads

 

This is the same frame just loose in the jig.   The Keel joint is a little sloppy, there is a shadow on the left hand side because of the camera angle.

 

Attached File  2013-03-11 11.36.10.jpg   64.92KB   0 downloads

 

Well back to work, another eight more to go. It sure takes a lot of time to make these frames.

 

 

 

 


  • fatih79 likes this

Ron

 

 

Current Build: H.M.S. Triton Cross Section 1:48

 

Why is it that I always find out the best way to do something is after I have already done it the wrong way? - Me

 

 


#31
sonicmcdude

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Nice Start Ron! I think the Triton is the best for first build. And you have a full support from the members of the MSW.


Greetings, Sinan :pirate41:

Build log:TRITON POB 1:72

 

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#32
russ

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I would say do not pay attention to the time it takes. Enjoy the accomplishment with each new part you make. Do a little at a time and before you know it, the frames will be installed.

 

Your first frame looks good. Nice work so far.

 

Russ


  • mtaylor likes this

#33
mtaylor

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Nicely done on the frame, Ron.   What Russ said... I agree 100%.


Mark

"The shipwright is slow, but the wood is patient." - me


Current Build:

Licorne - 1755 from Hahn Plans (Scratch) Version 2.0

Past Builds:
Triton Cross-Section
USS Constellaton (kit bashed to 1854 Sloop of War (Gallery) Build Log
Wasa (Gallery)


Member of the Nautical Research Guild


#34
Boccherini

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Ron,

good start. You might want to leave a little more width on the frames to allow some room to move when fairing. It's easier to remove a little excess than to fill in low spots.

 

Regards,

Grant.



#35
rummy

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Ron the first one is the hardest.Yours looks a whole lot better than my first one,which is in the scrap box. This learning stuff is really fun.I feel sorry for thoes that allready know it all. :P  :D     Larry


With Age Comes Wisdom,I'm Still Waiting!

 

Current Builds:Syren.Triton Cross section.

Completed Builds: Virginia by AL

                           King of the Mississippi by AL

                           Constellation by AL


#36
Pete38

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Very nice start to your frames, looking good. As everyone has said, take your time and do each step and before you know it they are done. Looking forward to more


Triton Cross Section 1:32

 

SEE YA LATER

 

im-outta-here-bye-bye-smiley-emoticon.gi

 


#37
Long9Ron

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Ron,

good start. You might want to leave a little more width on the frames to allow some room to move when fairing. It's easier to remove a little excess than to fill in low spots.

 

Regards,

Grant.

 

Sinan, Russ, Mark and Larry 

 

Thanks for the kind words. I think that I'm rushing too much. I just get excited and want to go, go, go. I must slow down.  :unsure:  

 

 

Grant

 

You know your 100% right. The thing is that this is all a learning curve for me. Learn as I go thing. Never have built a wooden model in my whole life. I think that my mistake was that I first cut out the pieces on the scroll saw and cut just outside the lines. Then I used the mini drum sander and sanded right down to the line and then I assembled the frames and sanded more, and in some spots the frames are to thin. I think that I should have roughly cut outside the lines and then assembled the frames and then sanded the whole frame to size. I think that I assembled the frames pretty sloppy also, which added to the situation. Some of the joints have a gap. I'm debating whether to use a sawdust-glue compound to fill the gaps or to live with it and maybe plank the whole section and leave no framing exposed.    


Ron

 

 

Current Build: H.M.S. Triton Cross Section 1:48

 

Why is it that I always find out the best way to do something is after I have already done it the wrong way? - Me

 

 


#38
Long9Ron

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Well I'm starting to slow down a bit and looking more at the detail of the work done. As this is my first build I have a lot to learn. Lessen learned to date...... SLOW DOWN AND CONCENTRATE ON QUALITY NOT QUANTITY.

 

I noticed that my frames were not up to my standards. I don't like to do a sloppy job, but I'm just learning and this is my first build. There were a few gaps in the frames and a few dents and such, but, I have decided not to redo them as they will be hidden anyway because I think I will do a full planking on the inside and out. But, I did decide that I would use a sawdust-glue mixture to fill in the gaps. Just to try and fix it up and to learn how to fix my mistakes as I go along. One reason why I decided to plank inside and out all the frames is because in my quick rush and inexperience, some places of the frames are too thin due to poor cutting and sanding. I believe that I can live and learn with that. Anyway, I have made the frames and filled in the gaps and I'm ready to mount them in the jig. 

 

Attached File  My Triton Cross Section Frames.jpg   47.56KB   0 downloads

 

I'm also doing a little experiment on some wooden toothpicks. I have sanded some down to take off the shine and also cut off the ends and I'm soaking them in a dark walnut stain for a few days to see if the stain will penetrate into the core of the wood. I did do a small sample of the same but did not let them soak at all and I notice that the stain only coated the outside of the wooden toothpicks and not the inside. That was not good enough, so I thought that I would soak them for a few days to see what would happen. Will update later.

 

Attached File  Dark Walnut toothpick test.jpg   47.98KB   0 downloads

 

Notice in the above picture, my zero insert for my scroll saw. It works a lot better now and doesn't break off the ends of the pieces when I cut them. 

 

Well back to work. Hope to have a few more pictures to post later. 

 

 

 

 


Ron

 

 

Current Build: H.M.S. Triton Cross Section 1:48

 

Why is it that I always find out the best way to do something is after I have already done it the wrong way? - Me

 

 


#39
Matrim

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Cool, - small gaps (especially with planking) can be covered by sawdust and glue to be almost invisible. Not so easy to cover frame issues though. Are you intending to use the toothpicks for treenails?? if so standard bamboo is easier to get to size and when stained because the end grain is showing it soaks up the oil and appears 'dark' automatically. If not then apologies as that will not have helped.

 

Joss.


Ours is a life of constant reruns. We're always circling back to where we'd we started, then starting all over again. Even if we don't run extra laps that day, we surely will come back for more of the same another day soon. - Joe Henderson


#40
harvey1847

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But, I did decide that I would use a sawdust-glue mixture to fill in the gaps.

 

Hello Ron!

 

I use small chips of the same wood to fill the gaps. I glue them with white glue and them cut them with a chisel or a shrarp file. Then I sand the joint. If the gap is tiny the sawdust will do the job.

 

 

 

Good luck with this.

 

Daniel.






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