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HMS Triton (cross section) by Gabe K - 1:96

Triton Cross section Scratch build HMS Triton

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#1
GabeK

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I just finished my first ship model last weekend, I've got another kit on the go, but this Triton project looks really cool and will most definitely be educational. I'm really looking forward to this.

Smaller scales appeal to me for some reason. This works out well because our house is so jammed with stuff that I really don't have a lot of room to display models!😩

I had a piece of chechen wood, which I have no clue about but I picked up from the sale table at Lee Valley a while ago because it has an interesting look to it. Being thinner stock I was able to run it through my little table saw and prepare the stock for the keel pieces. A few years ago I took up relief carving as a hobby, primarily because I wanted to eventually carve decorative work for future models. After experimenting with a couple different methods, I realized that cutting a v-shaped rabbet was very similar to carving letters, so I ended up using one of my straight chisels and basically carving a very long letter I.

Started with a scribed line to follow
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Honed the chisel often
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Plunged in at an angle, repeated from the other side
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  • mtaylor, harvey1847, themadchemist and 2 others like this

Current builds:
Harvey, Baltimore Clipper - Artesania Latina
HMS Triton Cross Section, 18th Century Frigate - online scratch build
Santa Maria, Caravel - Artesania Latina

Completed:
Swift - Artesania Latina --- Build log --- Gallery

Skeeter, Ship-in-Bottle - Ships a Sailin' kit --- Build log


#2
Pete38

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Welcome to the Cross Section. You have a very nice start to your build. Looking forward to more updates....


Triton Cross Section 1:32

 

SEE YA LATER

 

im-outta-here-bye-bye-smiley-emoticon.gi

 


#3
Tim C

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1:96 wow you will be working at a small scale. Enjoy

 

Later Tim


Current Build -- Finishing a 1:1 House that I've been building for a while

Current Build -- Triton Cross Section


#4
GabeK

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Thanks, folks!
I've been looking at some of the other builds and, I must say, I'm a little intimidated! There is a lot of phenomenal work going on in these Triton builds and I hope I didn't bite off more than I can chew. However, I gotta start somewhere...and I know people here are great.
Regards,
Gabe
  • Tim C likes this

Current builds:
Harvey, Baltimore Clipper - Artesania Latina
HMS Triton Cross Section, 18th Century Frigate - online scratch build
Santa Maria, Caravel - Artesania Latina

Completed:
Swift - Artesania Latina --- Build log --- Gallery

Skeeter, Ship-in-Bottle - Ships a Sailin' kit --- Build log


#5
harvey1847

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Hello Gabe and Welcome Aboard!

 

And me... working on 1:48 Ays!! :D

 

Beatiful tools and hands. Hope this projesct will satisfied you!

 

welcome aboard again and happy modelling!

 

 

Daniel.

 

p.s. I made my Harvey back in 2006 and was an excellent ship to make.


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#6
AnobiumPunctatum

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Welcome to the Triton shipyard and a lot of fun with your build


Regards Christian
 

In the shipyard: HM Sloop Fly, 1776 - Scale 1/32;

On the drawing board: Naval Cutter Rattlesnake, 1777 - Scale 1/32


#7
GabeK

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March 2014

My main motivation for starting this project was to learn the craft of scratch-building - and the online format with so many build logs and supportive modellers makes this an ideal educational environment. I also wanted to develop my skills on some of the power tools I now own, some of them thanks to my friend Clarence who was an avid woodworker but downscaled his workshop when he and his wife decided to sell their home and move into a senior's condo. His scroll saw has basically been collecting dust in my home except for the one scary time I used it to cut the rail cap on my first build, the Swift. I had no clue how to properly work it, so this project was going to be my scroll saw course.

As I looked over the plans for the Triton it started to dawn on me what a challenge1/96 might be. The size of the parts for the frames would make things 'interesting' in the Chinese curse way. The futtocks would have to be cut from 3/32 stock. This was my first scratch build so I still wanted to try assembling frames, but making 9 of them at this scale was beginning to worry me. So, I came up with a compromise that I could live with...but I'm not sure what you folks might think. I plan on building the outermost frame pairs (4 and D) accordingly, but the inner frames I'm going to cut as single pieces. This way I get some experience building up frames, the model will look more authentic (outwardly at least) and I won't go nuts.

After some research and a look through my supply of wood, I decided to go with birch for the inner, one-piece frame pairs. To get my 1" stock down to 3/16" it needed to be resawn and then planed...and I didn't have the equipment to get this done. However, we have a wood shop in the school where I teach and the woods teacher was happy to help me out. So, after classes on a Friday afternoon he coached and helped me make the stock I needed. (Thanks, Michael!). Later that evening I printed out the frame plans and glued them to the birch with spray adhesive.

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The next day I used the band saw to roughly cut apart the frames. I grabbed #4 and took it to the scroll saw for the moment of truth. I set up a fine-toothed blade, dialed in a fast speed and nervously pushed the wood into the teeth. Well, I suppose it was an ok job...but it took a bit more reading, a great YouTube video and a few more frames before I could really say I had the hang of cutting a controlled line!


My goal was to use the scroll saw to get to about a millimetre of the line on the plan and then take the frame to my little belt sander to get the wood to the line. But, the frames at this scale were just so thin that I became very nervous about snapping them while getting them to size. So, I decided to cut and sand to the inside line before even cutting the outside to give at least some support to the wood as I worked on it. I chose to do the inside first because it was harder to work with at the sander.


The belt sander was terrifying to use...it could remove material so fast that it took a very light touch and a lot of concentration not to grind a frame down too far. There were many heart-stopping moments, and one mistake that will need a bit of a fix. To smooth out the lines left by the sander I made a couple of sanding blocks that fit the inner and outer curves of the frames using a product called Sand-to-Shape. I had picked these up at the sale table at our Lee Valley.


Eventually I had the hang of things and I was able to complete a frame in about 30 minutes.

I soon realized that my one-piece frame pairs had a weakness. The upper futtocks ran with the grain of the wood, but the grain went across the first and floor futtocks. So, in addition to being very thin I had to be careful not to stress the lower parts of the frames too much. Sure enough, while cutting frame 3 on the scroll saw the blade caught the wood and it snapped. The worst part was that it happened while cutting the outside line...AFTER I had already spent the time and energy to cut and sand the inside of the frame. Ah well.

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  • Pete38, mtaylor, harvey1847 and 6 others like this

Current builds:
Harvey, Baltimore Clipper - Artesania Latina
HMS Triton Cross Section, 18th Century Frigate - online scratch build
Santa Maria, Caravel - Artesania Latina

Completed:
Swift - Artesania Latina --- Build log --- Gallery

Skeeter, Ship-in-Bottle - Ships a Sailin' kit --- Build log


#8
Matrim

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Nice and good detail on how you did it, thanks..


Ours is a life of constant reruns. We're always circling back to where we'd we started, then starting all over again. Even if we don't run extra laps that day, we surely will come back for more of the same another day soon. - Joe Henderson


#9
GabeK

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Thanks, Matrim.

I have a joke I tell all my friends...

Do you know what a short story is?

I don't.

I was a bit tired when I posted the last entry. I duplicated one photo and forgot this one of the completed frames.

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  • mtaylor, harvey1847, themadchemist and 2 others like this

Current builds:
Harvey, Baltimore Clipper - Artesania Latina
HMS Triton Cross Section, 18th Century Frigate - online scratch build
Santa Maria, Caravel - Artesania Latina

Completed:
Swift - Artesania Latina --- Build log --- Gallery

Skeeter, Ship-in-Bottle - Ships a Sailin' kit --- Build log


#10
Tim C

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Enjoy the build, it's looking good.

 

Later Tim


  • GabeK likes this

Current Build -- Finishing a 1:1 House that I've been building for a while

Current Build -- Triton Cross Section


#11
themadchemist

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Nice work!

 

Just remember, you can tell the experience of a builder by the size of their scrap bin. There's no lesson learned quite like repeating the same task and no lesson learned quite like the tasks that fail. We learn so much more from failure then success sometimes.

 

1:96, Wow, you do like a challenge


  • qwerty2008 and GabeK like this

#12
ziled68

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Hello Gabe,

I just went over your post and am impressed with your take on the Triton. I believe that it will make for a very attractive addition to your models. Keep up the great work via photos and narative (I truly enjoyed your narative because I felt like I was there when frame three snapped).


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#13
GabeK

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Nice work!
 
Just remember, you can tell the experience of a builder by the size of their scrap bin. There's no lesson learned quite like repeating the same task and no lesson learned quite like the tasks that fail. We learn so much more from failure then success sometimes.
 
1:96, Wow, you do like a challenge

 

Thanks, Keith. Your feedback really gives me a boost everytime. Looking at my scrap bin I think I'm on my way to being an Einstein!

 

Hello Gabe,
I just went over your post and am impressed with your take on the Triton. I believe that it will make for a very attractive addition to your models. Keep up the great work via photos and narative (I truly enjoyed your narative because I felt like I was there when frame three snapped).


Thanks, ziled. Looking forward to seeing your Triton. I once read that Oliver Cromwell told an artist that was painting his portrait to paint him "Warts and all". A philosophy to which I highly subscribe. There's something cathartic about putting your mistakes out there for others to see. Having a laugh over them even better!

Regards, folks.
Gabe

Current builds:
Harvey, Baltimore Clipper - Artesania Latina
HMS Triton Cross Section, 18th Century Frigate - online scratch build
Santa Maria, Caravel - Artesania Latina

Completed:
Swift - Artesania Latina --- Build log --- Gallery

Skeeter, Ship-in-Bottle - Ships a Sailin' kit --- Build log


#14
Splice the Mainbrace

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Wow, I love the scale and detail. Very smart. Well done


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#15
GabeK

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Thanks for the comment, Donny. I have been rather occupied the last few weeks - I'm a high school teacher and June is a crazy month. However, today I started summer vacation and I hope to get back to my builds, shortly.
Regards,
Gabe

Current builds:
Harvey, Baltimore Clipper - Artesania Latina
HMS Triton Cross Section, 18th Century Frigate - online scratch build
Santa Maria, Caravel - Artesania Latina

Completed:
Swift - Artesania Latina --- Build log --- Gallery

Skeeter, Ship-in-Bottle - Ships a Sailin' kit --- Build log


#16
themadchemist

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Gosh, here in the US high school teachers finish for summer break in late May. Your right though, those last few weeks are a turmoil. I always think I got summer fever worse than the students did though :D.

 

Here's to an excellent summer break of fun and a bit of ship building along the way.



#17
ChadB

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Very nice Gabe! It's going to be great to follow along and see how you deal with any problems from working in such a small scale. Keep up the great work! -Chad


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#18
GabeK

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Ah...summer holidays. Done another term of teaching and managed to finish a ship in a bottle as a gift for my dad while my parents were in town to celebrate my youngest son's graduation from high school. I can now pick up the Triton where I left off.

I had already prepped some 3/16" cherry for the two frame pairs (C and 5) that I was going to build up. I glued the futtock patterns along the grain and roughly cut them out on the scroll saw. Not ever having done this before, I decided to try to complete one frame pair first before working on the other and make any necessary modifications to my method. I left extra wood on the futtocks thinking that it might be easier to clean them up once the frames were all built and stronger.

Thinking of some of the things I want to do with this build I began doing some more research on frigate construction. I own the Anatomy of a Ship books on the HMS Pandora (24 gun) and the HMS Diana (36) and I soon noticed that chocks were used between most of the futtocks, particularly the lower ones, and sometimes scarfs for upper futtocks. I made a decision that I may regret later: I was going to install chocks on these built-up frames, but only on the futtocks that would be visible in the completed model. At first I thought I could just fake the chocks by scoring the frames with an x-acto knife, but I realized that the butt joint between the futtocks would bisect the simulated chocks. So, I was going to actually make chocks. The chocks in these two books look similar, but the Diana shows them being longer and more gently tapered than on the Pandora. Although I liked the look of the sleeker chocks, I decided to copy the Pandora version because the size of that frigate is closer to the Triton. Also, I thought that cutting out the futtocks at this scale might be easier with shorter chocks.

I did a few measurements and calculations to come up with a plan to follow. Because I was using some really small measurements (0.7 mm in some cases) I used a knife to mark my lines on the wood. I soon discovered that cherry was fairly easy to cut so I used the knife to cut out the shapes rather than a razor saw as I had first intended. I cleaned up the notches with a needle file.

Three steps in making the frames
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I decided to build up the frames individually and then glue the frame pairs together before installing the chocks. To build up the frames I cut the futtocks to the butt joint lines and I lined them up on a printout, using pins to hold them in place. A drop of cyano on the joints was used to hold the futtocks together until I could glue the frame pair. I carefully sanded one side of each frame on a flat surface and glued them together with carpenter's glue. I cleaned up the squeeze out where the chocks will go with a dental pick.

I'll find out if this was all a mistake when I add the chocks and clean up the frames.

Pinned and ready for cyano
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Frame pair ready
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Frame pair glued
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Edited by GabeK, 14 July 2014 - 03:26 AM.

  • mtaylor and themadchemist like this

Current builds:
Harvey, Baltimore Clipper - Artesania Latina
HMS Triton Cross Section, 18th Century Frigate - online scratch build
Santa Maria, Caravel - Artesania Latina

Completed:
Swift - Artesania Latina --- Build log --- Gallery

Skeeter, Ship-in-Bottle - Ships a Sailin' kit --- Build log


#19
GabeK

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Well, thought I'd just check the glue and found it was dry. So, I decided to try adding chocks...it took maybe 30 minutes, if that! Tough to get a perfect fit, but I think it will do. I also noticed just how much stronger this frame is compared to the one-piece frames I've already made. Using the grain of the wood properly sure helps!

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Sanding the frame to size is next.
  • mtaylor, harvey1847, WackoWolf and 2 others like this

Current builds:
Harvey, Baltimore Clipper - Artesania Latina
HMS Triton Cross Section, 18th Century Frigate - online scratch build
Santa Maria, Caravel - Artesania Latina

Completed:
Swift - Artesania Latina --- Build log --- Gallery

Skeeter, Ship-in-Bottle - Ships a Sailin' kit --- Build log


#20
Matrim

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Good job so far, don't forget to leave a mm or two around both edges as you will need that when fairing the hull in place. It's easy to want to go to the line but is mostly a mistake (that I made...)


  • GabeK likes this

Ours is a life of constant reruns. We're always circling back to where we'd we started, then starting all over again. Even if we don't run extra laps that day, we surely will come back for more of the same another day soon. - Joe Henderson





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