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HMS Triton (cross section) by Gabe K - 1:96

Triton Cross section Scratch build HMS Triton

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#21
GabeK

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Thanks, Matrim. I think I may have made that mistake on the other frames, but they really are so weak that I can see them breaking when I try to fair them later. I think I may make the planking a bit thicker and fair up the lines by sanding them, instead. These outside, built-up frames however are much stronger (my hat goes off to the ship designers and builders of yore!)

And, like a kid, I couldn't wait to see what the frame would look like so I sanded it up and the chocks are almost invisible (just the way I like it!). A couple of the butt joints between the futtocks, however, are not tight...something I have to work on for frame pair 5.

(Hmmm...uploader said the picture file was too big...but it's only 715 kB. I posted the topic and hit edit, now it works. Anyone else getting this?)

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Edited by GabeK, 14 July 2014 - 03:35 PM.

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#22
ziled68

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Hey Gabe,

I was just checking in to see fellow Triton builder's progress and I take mt hat off to you Sir. Your level of dedication at this scale is truly amazing. I can't wait to see where you may go from here.

 

Warm regards,

Ray


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#23
GabeK

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Thanks for the comment, Ray. Many of the things I've been thinking of doing for this build I see in your impressive and incredibly quickly-built Triton! I even contemplated extending the model to include the mast, like you did...but I decided to go simple for my first scratch build. Looking at the AotS Pandora book I saw how the cross-section diagrams showed the outlines of the boats on the skids. In the back of my mind I thought it would be interesting to add them to my Triton and I could envision the cross section of the boats..and I see that you did it! Very, very cool. You have also given me a whole lot of new ideas I hope I can manage at this scale.

Regards,
Gabe

PS. Give my regards to Woody!

Edited by GabeK, 18 July 2014 - 07:41 AM.

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#24
ziled68

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Hello Gabe,

I am glad that I've given you insight at the possiblilities these marvelous models can provide. I must confess that the Triton was my first scratch built POF model I've ever built. On Facebook I see a lot of people that go to the gym with the mentality of, "Go big or go home". That being said, I brought that same mentality to my build and have never regretted a moment of it. Dare to dream big. Here's to breaking the barriers set in place by your own imagination.

 

Warm Regards,

Ray

 

P.S. Woody also says hi. 


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#25
GabeK

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Thanks, Ray.  

I suppose for my build...I should dream small?   ;)  

(I know that I'm thinking about this model so much that I'm starting to see it in my dreams!)

Regards,

Gabe


Current builds:
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#26
Mirabell61

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excellent work Gabe,

fantastic how thin an filigrane you are doing those Frames, the complete Framework later on must be very fragile, and hat off for all this in that scale you have Chosen...

Nils
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http://modelshipworl...to-date/#entry16246

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#27
GabeK

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Thank you, Nils! I am quite flattered for your acknowledgement and may I bow to you for your museum pieces!

Frame Bend 5
I noticed in the Triton plans that forward of the midship frame the floor futtocks face forward, and aft of the midship frame the floor futtock face aft. I decided to reverse frame 5 from the plans so I could show the different futtock arrangement and work on making a cross chock and some scarf joints. (I don't feel bad about this because some references support this arrangement).

I had already prepared the third and fifth futtocks according to plan before deciding to add chocks, etc, but to make the scarfs I had to cut out new pieces that were longer to allow the overlap at the joint. I thought that I would cut out a single piece of the two futtocks together, cut the scarf and pick which futtock came out better.

The cutting was much easier than I had anticipated, the knife I used sharp and the scarfs came out very clean. And now, my model-making colleagues, I have to confess that I cheated. I just put the two pieces back together in my build!


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Glued up
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Cleaned up
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Edited by GabeK, 23 July 2014 - 06:38 PM.

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#28
Pete38

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That is some very nice work at that small scale. Looking forward to more


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Triton Cross Section 1:32

 

SEE YA LATER

 

im-outta-here-bye-bye-smiley-emoticon.gi

 


#29
GabeK

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Fairing the frames
I've been thinking about how I was going to manage to fair frames that are as slender as these are. Being so flexible, my worry was that I couldn't keep them in position in a jig. I tried clamping them all together and found that they were quite rigid and could resist being moved around quite well. I decided to fair them bundled together like. At this scale, I didn't think that the shape of the hull would be drastically affected by removing the space between midship square frames at this scale.

At first I used popsicle sticks and binder clips as clamping cauls. These were a bit cumbersome to work around and staring at me from my pegboard were my beautiful little brass bar clamps. I taped card stock to the jaws to prevent maring the wood and switch over these.

Shaped sanding blocks worked well for the outside surfaces (I chuckle thinking of putting this over my knee like Ray did!) but there wasn't much room to work inside. I was about to make a sanding stick, like Ray did, and then thought of my files. Believe it or not, I ended up using a chainsaw file to fair the inside of my frames!

First clamping method
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Eventual clamping method.
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#30
themadchemist

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I love those brass bar clamps, but haven't broken down and added them to the collection. They look like they might be easy to build though. Hum (tmc scratches chin).

Isn't it amazing how better clamping can make a impossible job doable and a difficult job much easier.  I've found in this hobby of curved surfaces, clamping is an acquired skill that you learn from as you experience new clamping tasks. Tool wise I have more variety of clamping devices then any other type of tool.

 

Knowing the size of those clamps, they look enormous on that itsy-bitsy scale build. The popsicle stick really show just how small she is though. After my munckin longboat build, I learned that decreasing the scale, really increases the difficulty of the build.

 

There's nothing like a good sanding though to settle the nerves and relax as you get in the zone.


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#31
GabeK

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Well, I know that I'm ready for retirement. Work is getting in the way of all the things that I really want to do!😄

It's been a while since I was able to work on my Triton, but I managed a few hours over the Christmas break. At this point I needed to notch the frames for the keel and keelson. My worries were that I had to make sure the frames were lined up properly, that I had knew where the frame tops were and that I cut the notches exactly the same on each frame. Any small deviation would really stand out at this scale.

To mark the frames I printed copies of each frame plan onto transparency film, glued the film to frames and, using a knife and a little machinists' square, scribed where the frame tops, the deck clamps and the notches should be.

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Later I realized that I really did a lot of extra work and that I should only have marked the frame tops. I also began to panic about all the marks lining up. Making a straight line from frame C to 5 is what mattered and I could do that later.

I clamped all the frames together as before aligning them by the marks for the frame tops and scribed lines for the keelson. Using a razor saw I cut along the lines to the depth I needed. This is where the transparency film really worked well.

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Flipping over the frames I repeated the process for the keel.

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I scribed a line for the depth of the cut by joining the ends of the saw cuts and made a series of parallel cuts on the scroll saw. (Totally nerve-wracking)😥. I originally thought that I could whittle this notch away with an Exacto knife. However, the birch was so hard that I had to put a lot of pressure on the fibres and I actually split a frame part way. Glue and clamps allowed me to repair it, but I now have a deep-seated respect (and hatred😡) for birch!

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Lastly, I used a finely-honed micro chisel to cut away the material.

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And a check on how the cuts line up, and a dry fit of the keelson.

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#32
GabeK

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Well, I finally got some time to work on the Triton. Even though its been a while I have been thinking non-stop about this little model and I have been making some wild plans for her. One thing that I felt I needed to change were the keel, keelson and false keel. The dark contrast between the birch frames and the chechen was not what I wanted...not terribly realistic. So, I fabricated new pieces from birch. With the keel piece in place I used an exacto knife to mark the top of the rabet, and used an even larger straight gouge, finely honed, to cut the notch out.

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I cut the keel, etc., longer than needed so I could clamp the ends down. I saw this on another Triton build where the builder had screwed down the ends and thought it was an excellent method. However, I should have realized that I don't have screws small enough to do this at my scale. I ended up clamping them down with some planking screw clamps. I glued down a print of the frame plan to a work board to help with lining up the frames when the time came.

I spent quite a bit of time shaping the notches for the keelson and keel to get a tight fit. I kept the frames clamped together to help line things up and to help support the wood to prevent breaking another frame.

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After I had the keelson fitted I made use of a couple of miniature machinist clamps to make sure the keel and keelson lined up properly.

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When time finally came to glue the frames in place I oringinally wanted to use carpenter's glue so I could adjust and fiddle. However, when I was dry-fitting and rehearsing the work I realized that it was going to be a nightmare to clamp and hold these small frames in place. So, I decided to go with cyano gel...should give me a few seconds to play but only need to be held in place for a short time.

I thought that starting at the middle would be best so I picked frame 1 and, wouldn't you know it, as I was working out how to align the frame I forgot how delicate these were and I snapped it right in the middle. Let's just say that I dug deep into my lexicon of swear words. Clamped together, these frames had been sturdy and a few months away from this model made me careless.

I grabbed some brush-on CA and managed to fit the parts back together rather easily. I put it aside and decided to push on with frame O first.

When the time finally came to glue down the frame things went fairly smoothly. A small machinists square helped.

The first frame glued in...and the wounded Frame 1 lying off to the side


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I continued to frame C in fairly quick succession. I had cut many spacers of the correct width to help me with this and future stages and they proved invaluable. By the time I got to this point Frame 1 had had enough curing time so I just kept on going. I think the entire gluing stage may have taken 20 minutes. Thank you CA!


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I had to do a bit more filing to fit the keelson to my liking, but eventually it was glued up as well.

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Edited by GabeK, 04 April 2015 - 07:23 PM.

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#33
bigcreekdad

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Looking good...I've got to get back to mine.


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#34
ziled68

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Hello Gabe,

I'm glad you didn't give up on your Micro Triton. Your choice of timber and your level of care at these delicate pieces is rather impressive. I look forward to more of your updates.

 

Ray


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#35
GabeK

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Thanks for the comments, Ray and bigcreekdad. I won't be giving up on this any time soon even though it may drive me nuts. Which is what most of us ship modellers probably are, come to think of it! :D

Clear skies and sharp tools!

Gabe

Edited by GabeK, 06 April 2015 - 10:43 PM.

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#36
GabeK

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Well, it's been a while since my last entry...but I haven't been entirely inactive. My progress has been slow primarily because I was working out some problems with making dimension lumber on my little Microlux saw. Try as I might, I just couldn't rip some maple into 1.5 thick strips. At first, the strip would start off fine but after a few centimetres it would wander out and get wider. I played with the fence and stopped the wandering, but then the pieces were coming out tapered from top to bottom. I guessed that the blade was slewing out so I opened the saw and tightened things up. No luck.

I finally realized that the fence was still the culprit and ended up clamping a chunk of wood to the table as a more reliable fence and I was off to the races.
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After ripping a bunch of 1.5 mm thick pieces, I marked the frames for the deck clamps. This is where having a framing jig would have been nice. Even though the frames were clamped together while I wasn't working on the model, the spaces between them were not even when set up to install the lower deck clamps. So, I used spacers. Looked like a mess...but it worked.

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I tapered the top edge of the deck clamps for a better fit for the deck beams when that time comes and glued them in.


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Edited by GabeK, 12 December 2015 - 07:04 AM.

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#37
mtaylor

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Excellent improvisation, Gabe.   I agree, the fence on those saws is very problematical but I'm glad you got it sorted and are back building.


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Mark

"The shipwright is slow, but the wood is patient." - me


Current Build:

Licorne - 1755 from Hahn Plans (Scratch) Version 2.0

Past Builds:
Triton Cross-Section
USS Constellaton (kit bashed to 1854 Sloop of War (Gallery) Build Log
Wasa (Gallery)


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#38
GrantGoodale

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Impressive work.



#39
GabeK

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Thanks for the comments and likes, folks, but...

NOT SO FAST!
Seriously...I shouldn't have been so fast!

I was so excited to get moving again on my miniTriton that I made a couple of BIG mistakes:

1) When I took the gluing clamps off I noticed something strange. I then realized that I had grabbed the wrong piece of wood for one side! 😫 At this small scale the difference of half a millimetre is enormous...but to my tired, old eyes and progressive lenses...well... lets just say I learned a lesson! However, I'm going to leave these in for now because they are stabilizing my frames nicely. I'll remove them after I get some more wood laid down and have a more sturdy model. Next steps will be limber strakes and thick stuff.

2) I misread my notes! 😖 Or, rather, my tired old brain forgot to read the notes I made months ago about how I was going to build this model. I had originally planned to lay out the deck clamps in anchor stock as per Anatomy of the Ship: Diana. I had all the measurements worked out long ago but last night I was looking at the cross-section on p.61 where it isn't obvious that the clamps are supposed to be anchor stock.

#57 is what I was after...
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My notes from 9 months ago...
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I'm already laying out the wood for the replacement clamps...and double checking!

Chagrined but still determined,
Gabe

Edited by GabeK, 12 December 2015 - 04:30 PM.

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Skeeter, Ship-in-Bottle - Ships a Sailin' kit --- Build log


#40
GabeK

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Limber Strakes

After cutting some 1.70 mm thick planks and ripping one to 3.50 wide, it was time to cut the rabbet for the limber boards. I really wanted a marking gauge that could scribe 0.95 mm and 0.75 mm widths. I contemplated building one but thought accurate measure might be tough. I then looked at my digital calipers and those nice sharp edges on the jaws and realized I had my marking gauge. I ran the caliper along the edges until I had nice, clear lines scribed. To keep the two strakes consistent, I laid out the rabbet on one long strip which I would cut to length afterwards.

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These scribed lines were deep enough to run the xacto along them carefully without a straight edge.

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After about a dozen passes down each line a very clean rabbet was formed.

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After rough cutting this piece to length, I glued the larboard strakes into place. A 2.50 mm spacer strip helped line them up parallel to the keelson.
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HMS Triton Cross Section, 18th Century Frigate - online scratch build
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Swift - Artesania Latina --- Build log --- Gallery

Skeeter, Ship-in-Bottle - Ships a Sailin' kit --- Build log





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