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How I fix Boo-Boos and Oopsies (Mistakes) by Dan Vadas - Share your own "Fixes" here


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#21
Long9Ron

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Yes. I like this thread also. I will learn a lot from the mistakes of others and myself. I will have to start recording all my boo boos also, but if I do that I won't get anything else done. :D  


Ron

 

 

Current Build: H.M.S. Triton Cross Section 1:48

 

Why is it that I always find out the best way to do something is after I have already done it the wrong way? - Me

 

 


#22
rameyke

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I think the best thing I learned from this thread is that these mistakes are recoverable.  As I read thru them and saw the broken stem...My initial thoughts would have been scrap it and start over.  The warped keel would have stopped me in my tracks and i would have another unfinished project to add to my collection.  Thanks everyone that has shared.  This has given me hope that i can accomplish my next build and come back from mistakes that I will surely make.


  • Dan Vadas and keelhauled like this

Current Build: US Brig Syren by Model Shipways

Previous Build: AL Swift


#23
TBlack

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I've found that the modeller has to be more creative in fixing the mistakes than he/she does in building the model in the first place.


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#24
druxey

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This is probably one of the most educational threads on the site. Thank you Dan, for letting it all hang out! You show how apparent total disasters can be rescued, which gives us all hope.


  • les101 likes this

#25
bhermann

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My latest oops was to rip the rope for the parrel trucks on one of the gaff jaws right out of the end of the gaff.  The fix I used is documented in my log here.

 

The damaged part looked like this after the mishap and before the fix:

 

DSCN1013.jpg

 

Bob


Edited by bhermann, 14 March 2013 - 03:07 PM.

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Current build -- MS Bluenose

Future build - MS Flying Fish

 

"A ship is safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for." - William G. T. Shedd


#26
st george

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Great thread Dan,

 

David


David

 

Current Build : HMAV Bounty - Amati

 

Next Build : 18th Century Longboat


#27
Elia

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My most recent boo-boo (in a great lineage of ship modeling boo-boos):

 

problem: a fine cove scraped into a waist plank on my current schooner model.  The cove should run perfectly parallel to the edge of the plank.  The cove is ~ 1/32" wide and deep, is painted yellow, and is a subtle but visible decorative element to Gloucester fishing schooners.

 

cause: poorly executed scraping; probably a poorly executed scraping tool; and the builder not addressing the problem immediately, instead of waiting until the entire hull was complete and painted!

 

chosen solution: create a shallow depth cutting tool (which cuts to a shallow depth offset a given distance from the edge of the plank with the cove).  Use a chisel to remove remaining material.  Cut a custom sized replacement strip of wood, glue in place.  Sand flush to adjacent planks.  Apply putty/filler.  Sand smooth.  Apply primer.  Finish sand.  Then apply finish coat of yellow to the new wood, mask, and re-apply black hull paint.

 

link to build log page with egregious error and fixhttp://modelshipworl...schooner/page-4

 

Hopefully this will help others in their builds.

 

Cheers,

 

Elia


Elia

 

Rose Valley, PA

 

Arethusa: 1907 Gloucester Knockabout


#28
Dan Vadas

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Misaligned Deck Clamp

 

Part-way through the deck framing of my HMS Vulture I fitted the Lower Deck Clamps and Spirketing. The height of the tops of the Clamps was taken from the NMM plans, allowing for the height of the Deck Beams, and marked using a height gauge. I forgot to allow for the beam heights when I measured the aft end, resulting in the clamps being 6" too high at the Transom. This mistake wasn't discovered until a long time later, although I always had the feeling that something wasn't quite right (the deck clamp SHOULD have finished 6" BELOW the top of the Wing Transom at the height shown by the red line) :

 

Stuff-up on upper deck clamps 002.jpg

 

 

Fixing the problem on the open Starboard side was relatively easy - Isopropyl Alcohol soon softened the PVA and the aft section of the clamp could be removed, cleaned up and re-glued at the correct height.

 

 

Stuff-up on upper deck clamps 001.jpg

 

Stuff-up on upper deck clamps 008.jpg

 

 

The Port side was a different matter, as the Lower Clamp and Spirketting had been fitted. The top of the clamp needed to be cut down to the correct height - everything else was OK.

 

After marking out the correct height on the clamp I used an abrasive cut-off wheel in a Dremel tool (VERY CAREFULLY :huh:  ) to cut just above the line. A normal circular saw blade would have been far too aggressive and would have been impossible to use in this situation :

 

 

Stuff-up on upper deck clamps 003.jpg

 

Stuff-up on upper deck clamps 005.jpg

 

 

An Xacto knife and two Riffler Files completed the cleanup :

 

 

Stuff-up on upper deck clamps 006.jpg

 

 

This pic shows the lower deck clamps after the Wing Transom Knees have been fitted :

 

Wing Transom Knees 001.jpg

 


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____________________________________________________________________________________

Current Builds : HMS Vulture Cross-section   

 

Build Logs : Norfolk Sloop   18 foot Cutter    HMS Vulture Scratchbuilt from TFFM books Index 1   Index 2

 

18th Century Longboat in a BOTTLE

 

Restorations for Others :  King of the Mississippi  HMS Victory

Gallery : Norfolk Sloop, HMAT Supply, HMS Bounty, HMS Victory, Charles W. Morgan 18' Cutter for HMS Vulture HMS Vulture

 

18th Century Longboat in a Bottle

 

Other Previous Builds : Le Mirage, Norske Love, King of the Mississippi

"The measure and merit of an individual is not how they handle themselves in times of prosperity and good will, but how they handle themselves in times of turmoil and chaos"


#29
druxey

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Sometimes, like a good strategist, it's better to beat a retreat. Repair can sometimes be a snare and delusion - at least for me. I've spent hours trying to mend a piece unsuccessfully, only to then scrap it. Cut to the chase and make a new piece instead. Chances are, the replacement will be better than the original and take less time to make.


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#30
bogeygolpher

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As my very senior neighbor once told me, "The difference between an amateur and a professional is that a professional knows how to correct his mistakes".

 

Great thread, thanks to all.


  • capnharv2 and keelhauled like this

PROWE

 

If someone says something can't be done, it only means they can't do it.

 

Building:

 

MS 18th Century Longboat

 

Completed Builds:

 

Ships; AL Bluenose II 1989, Corel Toulonnaise 1995, Corel Flying Fish 2000, AL Scottish Maid 2005,

Sergal President 2010, Mamoli Beagle 2011, Corel Eagle 2013, Mamoli Constitution Cross-section 2014, Victory Cross-section 1/98 by Corel 2015

 

Card Models

Disney Nautilus 2010, Modelik PzKpfw IV Ausf.G 2013, Christmas Train by PaperReplika 2012, Canon Special Vehicle Series (Construction) 2013

Yamaha DSC11 Motorcycle 2013, Wrebbit Mercedes-Benz 500K Roadster 2014, Canon EOS 5D Mark II  2014,  WWII Tiger I Tank by Paper-Replika 2014,

Central Pacific no. 60 Jupiter card model 2015

 

 

#31
slagoon

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I have a boo-boo to share. I got new hobby lamps that have lots of joints for perfect light positioning. I had mine set sort-of low to keep out of my husband's eyes and went to move my Harriet Lane and I heard the disheartening snap of wood. The top section of my fore-mast had snapped off. Whose fault? MINE.

I knew that at less than 2mm thick, just gluing it would not do the trick.

CA_03241303072138-S.jpg

 

CA_03241303071720-S.jpg

 

so, here is what I did.

I found a piece of wire and a tiny drill bit to match

CA_03241303070296-S.jpg

 

and drilled a hole in the top of the mast and the bottom where the break occurred.

 

CA_03241303070857-S.jpg

 

Then I dabbed a tiny bit of gap-filling CA glue on the end of a piece of wire and inserted it in one end

 

CA_03241303071240-S.jpg

 

I added another dab of CA to the other end of the wire (now protruding from the mast), clamped it, and now it is allllll better.

DSC07192-S.jpg


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-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-Sarah
Current Build:

Krabbenkutter CUX-87
Harriet Lane
Fishcutter GO-38

In the Wings:
Corel Victory Cross section

Completed Build:
USS Missouri Posted Image HMS Bounty's Jolly Boat Posted Image Peterboro Canoe Posted Image

#32
Geoff Matson

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Nice save. Getting the hole centered in the mast is a real chore.


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Geoff
Current build : USS Constitution

 

Finished builds: Armed Virginia Sloop (in gallery)


#33
DCIronfist

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Thank you for sharing some of the missteps so new people can learn ( I wish I could say avoid but not that confident lol )

David     :pirate41:

First Build: Corsair Brigantine


#34
keelhauled

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Thank you, Thank you, thank your for sharing these solutions!! I can't tell you how much they are appreciated, both the information and the inspiration!

I didn't know that you could soften wood glue with isporopyl alcohol.  It will be very useful!


Currently building the Cutty Sark

http://modelshipworl...den-ship-build/


#35
Billl

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Mending a boo boo is like taking your car to the auto body repair person, only you are the repair person. The rate is the same: time (effort) and material. If it is a labor of love your time is free which allows you to spend more on material. After doing a couple of dozen builds, I have accumulated quite a lot of excess material that wasn't used, I keep it all in a box that I refer to as the lumber yard. So most of the time material is free also.


Current Build:

La Nina, Latina - Wood / 1:65

 

On The Shelf:

San Francisco II, Latina - Wood 1/90,     U.S.S. Constitution, Revell - Plastic  / 1:96 (Remake),     H.M.S. Bounty, Latina - Wood / 1:48,     H.M.S. /Mayflower, Latina - Wood / 1:64,     La Pinta, Latina, Latina - Wood / 1:65,     La Santa Maria, Latina - Wood / 1:65,

 

Completed:

San Francisco / Cross Section, Latina - Wood / 1:50,     Coastal Submarine, Revell - Plastic / 1:144,     Cutty Sark Wall Plaque, Revell - Plastic / 1:50,     H.M.S. Victory, Revell - Plastic / 1:146,

H.M.S. Bounty, Constructo - Wood / 1:50,     Oseberg, Billings Boats - Wood / 1:25,     Clipper Ship (Sea Witch), Unknown - Wood / 1:46,     U.S.S. Constitution, Revell - Plastic / 1:96,    

Man Of War, Scientific - Wood / 1:50,     Robert E. Lee, Scientific - Wood / 1:45,     PT-109, Revell - Plastic / 1:72,     U.S.S. Enterprise, Revell - Plastic / 1:720,    

R.M.S. Titanic, Revell - Plastic / 1:720,     Numerous other wooded tall ships and boats from companies named: Ideal, Dumas, Pyro.


#36
WackoWolf

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Danny,

 

    Now this is an excellent subject, which should be of interest to everyone. Thanks for making a tread about this. Will be interesting to see what others post about this.


Wacko
Joe :D

Go MSW :) :)

#37
ianmajor

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Nice save. Getting the hole centered in the mast is a real chore.

If you are like me and can't drill a hole in the end of a round item then try this jig. I have added some photos below to show making the jig from hardwood using basic tools. Normally I would use steel rod for the jig and a drill press or lathe to produce it accurately.......but here goes....

 

My target is to drill a 1mm hole in the end of 2 mm doweling.

 

Start with a small block of fairly close grained wood:-

 

2013 04 14 01.JPG

 

Having filed the top and bottom square put it in the vice and drill right through with the smaller bit (in this case 1mm - though see later comment). I used a Dremel, without the drill press it is better to use a hand powered drill on a wooden jig - less fierce.   

 

2013 04 14 02.JPG

 

Now put the larger bit (in this case 2mm) in the drill and using the existing hole as a pilot drill in about 2mm. The larger bit will follow the smaller hole concentrically so long as you don't drill too far.

 

2013 04 14 03.JPG

 

You will now have a block with a small hole right through:

 

2013 04 14 04.JPG

 

....with a larger concentric hole on the opposite end. Notice the hole is not in the centre of the jig. This does not matter as long as the two holes are concentric.

 

2013 04 14 05.JPG

 

In this case I put some 2mm dowel in the vice, it could be the top of a mast, etc. Now put the jig larger hole down on the end of the dowel. It should be a good push fit and not sloppy. 

 

(contd)


Edited by ianmajor, 14 April 2013 - 04:49 PM.

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Ian M.

 

Current build: HMS Unicorn  (1748) - Corel Kit

 

Advice from my Grandfather to me. The only people who don't make mistakes are those who stand back and watch. The trick is not to repeat the error. 


#38
Geoff Matson

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Thanks for post and tip. I will give it try


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Geoff
Current build : USS Constitution

 

Finished builds: Armed Virginia Sloop (in gallery)


#39
ianmajor

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2013 04 14 06.JPG

 

Now with the smaller (1mm) bit in a hand drill push the bit through the jig and drill in to the end of the dowel.

 

2013 04 14 07.JPG

 

The next photo shows the hole produced (bit out of focus I am afraid) which is pretty much in the centre of the dowel. 

 

2013 04 14 08.JPG

 

When drilling the first hole through a wooden jig it is better to select a smaller bit than the target eg in this case a 0.8mm bit. Then when the 1 mm bit is pushed through it will be held firmly and not wobble about. Obviously having used a wooden jig once it is best to throw it away.

 

If you have a drill press so much the better. You can use steel for the jig, plus a machine vice can be clamped on the drill press so that the press ensures concentricity rather than relying on the bit following a pilot hole.

 

Ian M.


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Ian M.

 

Current build: HMS Unicorn  (1748) - Corel Kit

 

Advice from my Grandfather to me. The only people who don't make mistakes are those who stand back and watch. The trick is not to repeat the error. 


#40
capnharv2

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Ian,

 

That's a brilliant idea! I assume you have several blocks for different size holes and different size dowels?

 

Thanks!

 

Harvey

 

Oh, one comment about using a drill press for the second hole. If the drill press and vise are stiff enough, won't the second hole follow the drill itself and not neccessarily the pilot hole? To me, the beauty of drilling it by hand is that the drill bit can self center on the pilot hole. The press and/or vise may not allow that.


Edited by capnharv2, 15 April 2013 - 12:02 AM.

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