Wally

CA glue and application

Just getting back into plastic model building and I have been reading that a number of you are using super glue. Wondering what brand / type you are using and how you are applying it? Didn't know if you were placing the glue on a pin or something to apply it to the piece. Building the Revell USS Constitution 1:96

thibaultron likes this

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Wally,

 

A lot of people have made their own applicators, pins fastened into wood, eyes of a needle that have been snipped.

 

I found for my purpose toothpicks, if you need a minuscule spot of glue you can shave to a tiny point. There cheap use once or twice and discard.

 

There other folks who have done this longer than I who probably can give better tips.

 

If you use the toothpicks treehuggers may be out to get you. :angry:

 

John

cdogg, donrobinson, Fright and 5 others like this

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When using ca I typically use the medium when I need a tiny bit I will use a pin in the end of a dowel as John mentioned. After awhile when the build up of glue gets to be too much on the end of the pin a quick pass through a bic lighter burns it off nicely. You can also buy applicator tips that fit on the bottle that work real good too.The thin ca I use only for repairing cracks or weak spots, and I rarely use the thick ca.

 Hope this helps

thibaultron, mtaylor and Canute like this

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I use medium and thin CA and for an applicator I use a piece of wire. I used different thicknesses of wire depending on how much glue is needed. When the tip gets too built up with old glue, I snip it off and have a fresh end to use. Eventually the wire gets too small so I cut another piece.

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My technique for getting tiny amounts of thin CA glue where I want it is to use a pair of tweezers to accept a tiny drop between the two metal tips. I can then blot one of the two tips on a paper towel, then when I close the tweezers again the residual drop spreads between the two tips again. I can keep repeating the process to further reduce the size of the drop. 

 

After a while of doing this, the tweezer tips have to be cleaned of the dried residual CA. I need to try the suggestion of the bic lighter!

mtaylor, Canute, thibaultron and 1 other like this

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Hi, Instead of the usual applicator I use a hyperdermic needle inserted into the glue bottle. Medium CA flows smoothly through its fine apeture giving a very small amount at the its tip. When you get a build up of glue at the tip run a small flame over it, CA is very flammable and it quickly burns off leaving a clear tip. Unlike a plastic tip this will last for years without the need for replacing, also it has a long fine reach

mtaylor, Modeler12, Canute and 4 others like this

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I use the Glue Looper - great product.  The Glue Looper people (husband and wife - the whole company) will be at my local IPMS club meeting this Friday night.

Kurt

Canute likes this

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Just about the only time I use CA with plastic models is when attaching photo etch parts to plastic. I just never got good results attaching plastic to plastic with super glue. Not that it won't adhere, but it usually creates more problems than it helps for me. That being said, a good friend told me about using the blue bottle of Gorilla Glue for attaching photo etch parts and it works very well for me. It's just the right consistency and I use a pin to apply it in very small amounts. The Gorilla Glue (make sure it's the blue bottle) gives a little time before it sets and allows you the time to make adjustments in case you don't get it in the correct position right from the get-go. It's a medium viscosity glue.

I have also used super glue to fill small cracks and seams. I use an accelerator in that particular application.

Canute likes this

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There are some great ideas here. 

But I keep coming back to round toothpicks. Note: round toothpicks, not the cheaper version.

They work well for me with epoxy, ca glue and PVA (carpenters glue).

post-246-0-19669300-1472867928.jpg   post-246-0-68714500-1472867999.jpg

If the little glob at the end is still too much, smear it on some scrap until there is enough for what you need.

 

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I may be too late to this topic but why in the world would you use CA to glue plastic to plastic? The special cement used in plastic modeling is especially designed for the job. It doesn't "glue" or joins the two parts together, but melts the plastic creating a very strong bond.

Canute, mtaylor, wefalck and 1 other like this

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I use zap a gap and metal dental pick maybe someone can suggest a cheaper glue ,I use zap a gap as I've seen others use it and it's never let me down there is cheaper alternatives however I'm frightened to try them

Canute, mtaylor and Robin Lous like this

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I've been pretty happy with Loctite gels. I store them in a jar with a silica gel pack in the bottom; keeps moisture away. Don't know if Loctite is sold in Europe. Sorry.

mtaylor likes this

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I use zap a gap and metal dental pick maybe someone can suggest a cheaper glue ,I use zap a gap as I've seen others use it and it's never let me down there is cheaper alternatives however I'm frightened to try them

 

For the amount of glue we use, cost should not be a factor. I have containers 'dry up' before they go empty.

I also like the stuff that comes in green bottles, have tried others, but keep coming back to what works good for me.

Steve 12345, mtaylor and Canute like this

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I have been using what`s called "super gold" CA. It doesn`t have any of those irritating fumes - in fact it is odorless. It takes a little longer to set,but that is usually ok. The only drawback is it`s quite a bit more expensive than regular CA. I don`t mind paying the extra,though,to not have those irritating fumes.

 

Mark

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Hi All,

 

I've had good success with a trick I read about on MSW some time back. One takes a needle, inserts it into the end of a dowel as a handle, then using wire cutters clip off the end off the needle creating two prongs. I made three with different sized needles, Like others I run them through a cigarette lighter to clean when they get guncked up.

 

Best,

John

mtaylor, Robin Lous, Canute and 1 other like this

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Whip_Tips.jpg

These do a pretty good job dispensing small amounts of CA.  I bought mine at Stew Mac.

And when these clog, just leave them in a closed jar with acetone overnight and they will come out like new. Experiment to see that the acetone doesn't attack the tip itself.

Canute and mtaylor like this

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