tkay11

Triton cross-section by tkay11 (aka Tony)

77 posts in this topic

COAMINGS AND GRATING

 

The joints were made as usual with the Proxxon saw. To cut the angles (63 degrees) I first inscribed the top edges by 1.73mm using dividers with the measurement derived from the TurboCAD programme.

 

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This then allowed me to use the saw at an angle which has a nicely accurate indicator in degrees. I edged the coaming towards the saw until it cut right at the line.

 

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By the way: if you do this, WATCH OUT FOR YOUR FINGERS AS YOU MAY FORGET THE EDGE OF THE SAW COULD BE CLOSER TO THEM THAN YOU THINK! I was wary of this, but thought I’d better mention it in case others might not have thought about it.

 

Having made the coamings, I could now install the grating I made earlier. I now realised that the long edges could not be the same width as the grating battens if they were to fit into the coaming I had made. I reckon I must have made a very slight error in cutting the strips, but thought that I might well make the same kind of error again so I went with the grating as made.

 

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You might well note that I've not curved the top of the grating to match the deck camber. My decision was the lazy one -- I followed the plans! As for the base of the coamings, where curvature would come into play, again I was lazy -- the tiny cracks at their base sides will be covered by the planking.

 

One small point to watch out for is that if you stick too closely to the plan measurements it is vital to check these against the actual measurements you achieve on the model. In my case the forward hatch I made came out 0.5mm less wide than on the plans, but as this was not going to affect anything except the width of the ladder, I kept the hatch I made.

 

LADDER

 

I debated a while as to how to make the ladder. Essentially the choice was between table saw, hand saw and mill. I decided the easiest would be to use the modified Proxxon drill stand that I made for the Sherbourne. You can see the design at http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/4539-how-to-modify-proxxon-mb-140-drill-stand-to-act-as-mill/?p=130660.

 

I made a very slight modification to that modification by adding a locking nut below the screw adjuster. This was because I found that vibration during milling made the screw gradually move upwards. You can see this further modification in the following pictures:

 

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The next question was how best to hold the ladder rails in place while milling. I made a paper template and glued that to a rectangle of fibreboard using water-based glue (Pritt stick).

 

After fiddling around clamping the rails to the template I decided to experiment and see if gluing the rail to the template would allow a sufficiently strong bond for milling. I used PVA to do this and it worked very well indeed – allowing me to remove the rail easily after milling with full-strength isopropanol, and allowing me to remove the paper templates from the fibreboard and the rails with a damp sponge.

 

An additional benefit of this way of clamping is that it allows an uncluttered view of the rails whilst milling.

 

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I could then proceed by clamping the board to the micro compound table.

 

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To make the rails equal in height and at the correct angles, I bound them together with a couple of spots of PVA, then used the disc sander for the angles. I was really thankful that the Proxxon sander’s degree marker was accurate!

 

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I then made a simple jig for placing the steps. I again used the idea of gluing a template to the fibreboard base, then gluing battens to the template. To keep the rails apart while fitting the steps I made two temporary and removable battens from old plywood.

 

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PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

 

This allowed me to assemble the coamings, grating and ladder.

 

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I can see from the results that I should really spend time sanding to achieve the glassy kind of finish that others have done, but for the moment I’m just pleased that I can make and put together all these pieces!

 

Next I’ll do some planking.

 

Tony

cog, Dupree Allen, Mumin and 14 others like this

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As I start the assembly process of my Triton Cross Section, I have become the preverbal sponge and am absorbing every detail of your build. I pay special attention to your remarks in using TurboCAD as I too want to hone my skills in this area. I applaud your decision to continue your build even in the face of your so called blunders. The learning process is greatly enhanced through trial and error. It takes a true craftsman to take a mistake and make it whole. Good luck and God speed.

 

Dupree

mtaylor, tkay11 and Canute like this

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Very well done Tony!

 

To achive the glassy look you should test Rustins Danish Oil (a bit difficult now with all the structures, as you apply oil, wait 5-10 minutes, remove the "rest" and then "polish" it a bit). 

 

Dirk

Canute, mtaylor, cog and 2 others like this

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Thanks for the likes!

 

Dupree: TurboCAD is for me an almost essential aspect of the model as it allows for accurate part making, dimension checking and making all sorts of jigs. As for making mistakes I agree they're an essential part of learning. That's why I try to highlight the ones I make for others to learn from as well.

 

Dirk: thanks a lot for the suggestion. It's a good one, as always. I'd thought about oil but then was worried about putting it on surfaces that were to be glued. Anyway, when I've finished assembly I'll practise with oil as you suggest. I always enjoy learning!

 

Tony

Canute, Dupree Allen and mtaylor like this

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Thanks to various comments (notably Dirk's -- thank you Dirk!), I decided to experiment a bit with oils. I decided in the end to make up my own Danish oil, seeing that I already had the ingredients. I followed the advice given by Bob Flexner at http://www.popularwoodworking.com/techniques/finishing/oil-finishes-their-history-and-use The recommended dosage to start with is one-third of each, so that’s what I mixed.

 

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I liked the results, so that’s what I’ll stick with for the rest of the build.

 

I planked just over half the gun deck, along with the lower strakes of the gun deck walls. I then oiled the inside of the lower walls and the two decks -- leaving the outside of the frames and the wall planking above the gun deck.

 

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I need to finish the planking of the gun deck walls, sand down the fore and aft section faces, and then I’ll be working on installing the eyebolts for the cannon and making up the gangway brackets.

 

Tony

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Thanks, Chad and Dirk! I feel slightly ashamed (edit: maybe 'embarrassed' would be a better word) when given such encouragement from those whose work I admire, since I don't think I'll ever produce work that's as beautifully finished and precise -- but it is indeed encouragement and much appreciated at that! And I certainly enjoy learning from you, so keep on building and logging if only for my benefit!

 

Tony

Canute, mtaylor, cog and 1 other like this

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Beautiful work, Tony! In the back of my mind I was contemplating a cutaway on my Triton, and seeing yours has convinced me!

Looking forward to seeing more on your build...

Clear skies,

Gabe

Canute, tkay11 and mtaylor like this

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Thanks, Gabe. The main motivation (apart from developing skills in making plank-on-frame models) was really to learn for myself and give anyone who's interested some understanding of how these ships were built. Almost nobody in my circle of acquaintances has much idea that there's even a hobby devoted to this kind of thing, let alone full builds, so they're quite intrigued, and, as I had guessed, simply cannot see the blunders that are glaringly obvious to my own eye -- and that's exactly as it should be.

 

Tony

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I hear you, Tony!  What I find ironic is that I'm deep in the heart of North America  https://clubrunner.blob.core.windows.net/00000050077/Images/Winnipeg.gif and I'm a nut about Nelson-era ships! Having said that - I've been able to touch the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic Oceans. 

 

I have also found this Triton build has really honed my understanding of ship-building and increased my respect for ship-builders before the industrial revolution.

 

Clear skies!

Gabe

mtaylor, tkay11 and Canute like this

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