GemmaJF

Sealer needed for acrylic paints?

Posted (edited)

Hi all, very general question regarding acrylic paint to wood. Is a sealer always required? Thinking of acrylic thinned down to airbrush consistency. Seems to me there is a lot of water content there that might not be good for a wooden model held together with PVA. Thoughts and advice appreciated on yes/no and which sealer would work with artists acrylics if it is needed.

Edited by GemmaJF
Robin Lous, Canute, mtaylor and 2 others like this

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Hi GemmaJF, I use a laquer sealer, then spray the acrylic. Once in a while I will just spray acrylic directly to the wood but I know it will raise the wood fibers that will need to be sanded off.  Then spray again, steel wool it, then a third coat.  Some woods my need a 4th coat.  

 

However, I most often use rattle cans of solvent paint.  The first coat is a primer, then look for blemishes, add filler paste to scratches and dings, sand over all and apply a second light coat of primer, then the finish coat.  

 

Duff

GemmaJF, Canute, thibaultron and 1 other like this

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Thanks Duff, I did wonder if not sealing the wood and raising the grain might give an interesting effect for some subjects! I'll try the different ideas you have provided on test scraps and see the results I get before committing to any large areas.

 

All the best

 

Gemma

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I agree 100% with what Duff said on the subject of the acrylic paints - I no longer use the solvent based stuff.

 

Don't worry about how "wet" the acrylic is - there just isn't enough to weaken any glue joint.

 

Kurt

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Agree with everything said!  I use only acrylic paints because they are so much easier to clean up than enamel paints.  I try to always use a lacquer based primer (I use a light grey one by Tamiya) before I put down any paint. The primer also seems to highlight any defects in the wood - little things I want to fill in or sand down further before I put the actual color on.   I've definitely noticed that I get much, much better finish with that primer on there.

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Agree with all said, what I started to do is make a thin coat acrylic urethane, that acts like a shellac spit coat but without the solvents.   I mix alcohol/water/urethane at a 25/25/50 ratio and save it in an old pickle jar.  Apply and sand between coats...works great at filling wood grain, then primer and top coat

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Hi; 

 

     The question I have is what is the appropriate finish when using acrylic paint on restoration projects of early 1900 pond boats. High gloss, simi gloss or flat. Also do you have a US web site for the best brand to purchase. Thanks. Pat

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