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Name the Ship Game


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3255 replies to this topic

#2441
trippwj

trippwj

    Scullery Maid

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That be the ol' gal - the Mary Manning.  Your turn!


Wayne

Neither should a ship rely on one small anchor, nor should life rest on a single hope.
Epictetus


#2442
Dave Fellingham

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Name the Ship:

a ship.jpg

One of two sister ships purchased to participate in an on-going illegal activity.



#2443
Dave Fellingham

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I'm surprised there have been no guesses; although little known, the ship is easy to find.



#2444
Stockholm tar

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Something to do with prohibition, perhaps?


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Kester

 

Current builds: Sherbourne (Caldercraft) scale – 1/64th;

 

Statsraad Lehmkuhl (half model) 1/8th" – 1'.

 

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Previous build: Bluenose ll (Billings) scale – 1/100th.


#2445
Dave Fellingham

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The clandestine operation was not rum-running.

 

Both ships were purchased in March 1947 from the United Fruit Company by the F. B. Shipping Company. Officially, the initials stood for "Far Better" but actually meant "F*** Britain". (No disrespect intended, this is a documented historical fact.)



#2446
Kevin from Hampton Roads

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The "Pan Crescent" and "Pan York" (renamed Atzma'ut and Komeimiut) were the two largest ships in the history of illegal immigration to Palestine.

http://www.jewishvir...ation/pams.html

Dave, I was looking for the wrong illegal activity all along. I started with prohibition then tried pirate radio with no success. This was a tough one.


Kevin

Hampton, VA

 

 

 

Current Builds: Skipjack Albatross - 1:32

 

On Hold: Yacht Atlantic - Scientific

 

Completed:  Ships Boat - MS - First Planked Kit


#2447
Dave Fellingham

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Well done, Kevin, you found it the hard way - Google Image identifies the ship in a few seconds. The photo is of the Pan Crescent (Atzma'ut). The Hebrew names given to the Pans, Komeimi'ut and Atzma'ut, translate respectively to Sovereignty and Independence;)

 

The Pans carried over 15,000 Jewish immigrants from Bulgaria to Cypress 27 - 31 December 1947, then transported most of the Jews interred there to Israel later in 1948. The best known of the immigration ships is Exodus 1947, the basis for a novel by Leon Uris and a movie, both titled Exodus. The Royal Navy had the un-enviable task of preventing illegal immigration of Jews to pre-state Israel before, during and after WW2.

 

Your turn, Kevin.



#2448
Kevin from Hampton Roads

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Ok, this has to be one of my favorite ships. Probably to easy.

Name the Ship.jpg


Kevin

Hampton, VA

 

 

 

Current Builds: Skipjack Albatross - 1:32

 

On Hold: Yacht Atlantic - Scientific

 

Completed:  Ships Boat - MS - First Planked Kit


#2449
jud

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Was she a cable laying vessel? Comes from somewhere back in the cobwebs in my mind that is she might be the Atlantic..

jud



#2450
Kevin from Hampton Roads

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Jud, you are half right. Cable laying was the only think she was successful at.


Kevin

Hampton, VA

 

 

 

Current Builds: Skipjack Albatross - 1:32

 

On Hold: Yacht Atlantic - Scientific

 

Completed:  Ships Boat - MS - First Planked Kit


#2451
Beef Wellington

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Great Eastern?


Cheers,
 
Jason


"But if you ask the reason of this, many will be found who never thought about it"
 
In the shipyard:

HMS Snake (c1797: Cruizer Class, ship rigged sloop)

HMS Jason (c1794: Artois Class 38 gun frigate)


#2452
Dave Fellingham

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That's the Great Eastern, designed by Isembard Kingdom Brunel. Launched in 1858 she was taken out of service in 1863 because she was too slow to compete in the aggressively competitive trans-Atlantic trade. Sold at auction in 1864 for about 25% of her value as scrap, she was converted to lay the first successful trans-Atlantic telegraph cable in 1866. She was the largest ship ever built until 1899. Propulsion was by paddle wheels, a screw and sails. The image is of her appearance as the cable layer, she was originally built with five stacks.

 

I just now found that Jason beat me to it.  :(  That's what I get for taking a break for breakfast.


Edited by DFellingham, 17 February 2014 - 04:06 PM.

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#2453
Kevin from Hampton Roads

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Jason, You got it.

 

Dave, my understanding of why the Great Eastern was not a success was that she was too big. There just was not enough passenger and cargo to fill the ship. If I remember correctly she was considered fast. Crossing in 9 1/2 days.

 

Your turn Jason.


Edited by Kevin from Hampton Roads, 17 February 2014 - 04:44 PM.

Kevin

Hampton, VA

 

 

 

Current Builds: Skipjack Albatross - 1:32

 

On Hold: Yacht Atlantic - Scientific

 

Completed:  Ships Boat - MS - First Planked Kit


#2454
Beef Wellington

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I always have such a hard time finding something, makes me regret guessing :-)  Anyway, hope this isn't too easy.  Name has been removed but no other changes.  I suspect its obvious if you know what to look for, otherwise looking at the lines will be of help. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • image.jpg

Cheers,
 
Jason


"But if you ask the reason of this, many will be found who never thought about it"
 
In the shipyard:

HMS Snake (c1797: Cruizer Class, ship rigged sloop)

HMS Jason (c1794: Artois Class 38 gun frigate)


#2455
Dave Fellingham

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Dave, my understanding of why the Great Eastern was not a success was that she was too big. There just was not enough passenger and cargo to fill the ship. If I remember correctly she was considered fast. Crossing in 9 1/2 days.

 

 

The Wikipedia entry for Great Eastern quoted from an article by R. A. Buchanon in Technology and Culture: "...she was used in the transatlantic business, where she could not compete in speed and performance with similar vessels already in service." Being even marginally slower than her competitors made it more difficult for her to make use of her capacity in passengers and cargo. The same Wiki entry also commented that Great Eastern could not take full advantage of the square sails on the center masts because the sparks and hot ash from the stacks set the sails on fire.

 

Great Eastern should be remembered for the innovations she brought to ship-building that are now standard features: the double hull and a compartmentalized hold. These features saved her from disaster when a pilot grazed the Northeast Ripps (now known as Great Eastern Rock) near Montauk, Long Island at 2:00 am, 28 August, 1862, that cut a hole over 9 feet wide and 83 feet long in her port side outer hull - about 60 times the area of the gash that sank Titanic. The passengers never even knew of this accident.


Edited by DFellingham, 17 February 2014 - 06:13 PM.

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#2456
Dave Fellingham

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The photo is used to illustrate both of the Royal Navy's Nelson-class battleships HMS Nelson and HMS Rodney. I'm unable to distinguish between the two. They were distinctive in that all of the main battery turrets were forward of the superstructure. The battleships were nicknamed Nelsol and Rodnol because of their superficial resemblance to Royal Navy oilers which all had names ending in -ol.

 

a ship.jpg


Edited by DFellingham, 17 February 2014 - 06:32 PM.


#2457
Beef Wellington

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Congratulations DFellingham - ship is HMS Nelson (believe differentiated by the "NE" on the 3rd turret and before the anti-aircraft batteries were installed in 1932). Like the picture above, a very perculiar class of battleship.  Anyway, over to you...


Cheers,
 
Jason


"But if you ask the reason of this, many will be found who never thought about it"
 
In the shipyard:

HMS Snake (c1797: Cruizer Class, ship rigged sloop)

HMS Jason (c1794: Artois Class 38 gun frigate)


#2458
Dave Fellingham

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I always have such a hard time finding something, makes me regret guessing :-) 

 

Agreed; finding an image of an interesting ship to post is frequently more challenging than finding the name that goes with a posted image, but I try to have fun with it. ;)

 

 

Name the Ship:

a ship.jpg


Edited by DFellingham, 17 February 2014 - 07:50 PM.

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#2459
realworkingsailor

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USS Independance (CVL 22)

Aircraft markings kind of made that one a give away...

Andy

Edited by realworkingsailor, 17 February 2014 - 09:03 PM.

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Quando Omni Flunkus, Moritati


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#2460
Dave Fellingham

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Andy, I have no idea how you got the name of the ship from the aircraft markings. Here's a 10X enlargement of three planes on her deck.

 

a ship1.jpg

 

USS Independence (CV-22, later CVL-22) was the lead ship of a class of light carriers built during WW2 from partly completed cruisers. Commissioned 14 January, 1943, she served in several Pacific Theater campaigns earning 8 battle stars. After the war she was a test target for two atomic bomb tests then was scuttled near the Farallon Islands west of San Francisco in January, 1951. Besides being highly radioactive, it is rumored that she had barrels of nuclear waste on board which have contaminated the wildlife refuge and commercial fisheries near those islands.

 

Your turn, Andy.


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