captainbob

HOGA (YT-146) by Cap'n'Bob - SMALL - 1:96 - Navy yard tug

151 posts in this topic

Hello all,

 

I am going to step away from sails for this build and build a boat I’ve wanted to build for a long time.

 

When I started modeling boats I was in an RC boat club in Indianapolis. We sailed One Meters in the summer and in the winter we ran scale RC boats in indoor swimming pools.  That’s when I saw a picture of a fire boat called “The City of Oakland”.  I wanted to build it 25” long (1:48 scale) with working water pump and monitors.  That was about ten years ago.  Since then I have been searching the web for all I could find.  And what I found changed my mind as to the build.

 

City of Oakland

post-513-0-80044300-1377723116_thumb.jpg

 

The City of Oakland was originally the yard tug HOGA YT-146.  The keel was laid down 7/25/1940, Launch date was 12/1/1940 and it was delivered to Pearl Harbor 5/1/1941.

 

(This is from the web)  City of Oakland, ex-Hoga, is of exceptional significance in American history as the only known surviving yard craft present at Pearl Harbor during the Japanese attack on the U.S. Pacific Fleet on December 7, 1941.

 

Hoga fought fires on Battleship Row for 72 hours.  The actions of the tug's skipper and crew did not go unrecognized. On February 1942, ADM. Chester A. Nimitz, CINCPAC, commended McManus, his men, and their tug for a job well done:

 

 “For distinguished service in line of your profession as Commanding Officer of the Navy Yard Tug HOGA, and efficient action and disregard of your own personal safety during the attack.... When another ship was disabled and appeared to be out of control, with serious fires on the fore part of that ship, you moored your tug to her bow and assisted materially in extinguishing the fires.  When it was determined that the damaged ship should be beached, as there was serious danger of her sinking in the channel, you assisted in the beaching operations in an outstanding manner.  Furthermore, each member of the crew of the HOGA functioned in a most efficient manner and exhibited commendable disregard of personal danger throughout the operations.”

 

Placed on loan to the Port of Oakland, California, in 1948, it was returned to the navy after 40 years of service.  Recently it was awarded to the City of North Littlerock, AR.  to be in their museum. At present it is in a boat yard near San Francisco being prepared for transport to North Littlerock  

 

Hoga is one of about 30 of the Woban YT-138 class.  The problem in this build is that there are no line drawings of this boat.  I have many, many pictures and internal equipment drawings but no lines.  I hope to build the Hoga as it was at Pearl Harbor prior to the attack.  I got the build plans for the Billing’s kit and I will scale the bulkheads and keel to 1:96 and see where to go from there.   So wish me luck and follow along with me. 

 

Bob

 

Hoga at sea trials

post-513-0-49294300-1377723130_thumb.jpg

 

Hoga at Paerl Harbor

post-513-0-88809800-1377723143_thumb.jpg

 

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Thanks Yves,

 

It turns out that the navy did not keep any plans of their small boats, such as tugs, so any hull plan would only be a close approximation.

 

Bob

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Hello Bob, what a great decision you made.  This tug is well worth the effort to commemorate it's distinguished service career.  I'm with you, I love tugs!  No matter what function, harbor tugs, seagoing tugs or what ever era.  They exude power and have character. 

I'll be following along.

 

Cheers,

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That will make a nice build of a significant part of your national history, Bob.

 

I note from the WWW that she is designated under your Parks Service 'National Historic Landmarks Program'.  Is it worth contacting them for information?

 

John

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I like tug boats. I've never been on one or have seen one in person but I like them anyway. I was going to start one but I decided to start small since I am new to ship building.

I'll watch this one since I know I'll be building one in the future.

 

Richard

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Piet,   -    I only hope I can do it justice.

 

John,   -   It was in the navy mothball fleet until quite recently.  Then there was a battle over which museum would get it.  It is now in dry-dock being patched up enough to make the trip through the Panama Canal and up the river to North Littlerock.  Now would be the only time that they could take off the lines and I really doubt they will.

 

Richard,   -   Thanks for stopping by.  Your Monterey should make a fine build.

 

Bob

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Bob - Count me in!!!  Have you seen the plans for the Nokomis (YT-142) on the Arkansas Inland Maritime Museum (AIMM) website?  Note there is a new Commodore for North Little rock (after about 100 years the prior Mayor retired last fall).

 

http://www.aimm.museum/photos-Hoga5-Blueprints.asp

 

No lines drawings posted, but may have more that they have not put on the web.

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Thanks Wayne,

 

Yes,   that is what I am comparing the kit drawings to.

 

For anyone interested the drawings at this site are squeezed end to end.  The ratio of length to beam is 4:1 that deck looks 2.5:1.  The pdf at  http://www.hnsa.org/doc/plans/index.htm  is correct.  The HNSA site also has pdf’s of many more US naval vessels from the 1940’s

 

Bob

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Folks,

 

I am with you all and love tug boats. My brother built the Saint-Charles a french tugboat at the 1/35 scale:

 

kjy1.jpg

 

I do not have a picture of his model, but it is the exact same one with a black hull (an earlier paint scheme). Below is the real stuff, on the banks of some river, most likely Paris or perhaps Marseilles.

 

5hyb.jpg

 

Tug boats are very special.

 

Yves

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I was on the YT150 in the mid 60's in Norfolk. this might help you if you want to build a model!  the attached  set of plans are of the Woban class which the 146 was. The 150 was built at the Defoe shipyard

 

ytb142plans 1.pdf

ytb142plans 2.pdf

ytb142plans 3.pdf

ytb142plans 4.pdf

ytb142plans 5.pdf

ytb142plans 6.pdf

ytb142plans 7.pdf

ytb142plans 8.pdf

 

post-1091-0-65913700-1377852702_thumb.jpg

Defoe Shipyard

 

Hoga.pdf

A set of pictures of 146

 

post-1091-0-95564600-1377852756_thumb.jpg

YT145 and 146 shortly after launching

 

post-1091-0-47247100-1377852760_thumb.jpg

YT146 fighting fire on the USS Nevada

 

You can download and use scaleprint to scale the plans and use the the bulkhead drawing , I have not been able to find a set of line drawing either

 

Hope this helps!

Woyot YTM 150 history.pdf

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Oh No!  Now I’m in trouble.  I have someone looking over my shoulder that knows what it really looked like.  Learner, feel free to jump in any time you see me straying.  Most ship molders don’t get to get this kind of firsthand information.  Thanks for all the pictures.  The Hoga.pdf was new to me.  I’ve been searching the web for about ten years and have pictures of twenty of the Woban class tugs but had not heard of the Woyot.  Do you know how many were in the class?

 

I hope to start cutting wood soon.

 

Bob

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count me in Bob!   sounds like a very nice project........I bookmarked that site you listed.  thanks for posting it.  I'll look forward in seeing the start of this fine build ;)

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Oh No!  Now I’m in trouble.  I have someone looking over my shoulder that knows what it really looked like.  Learner, feel free to jump in any time you see me straying.  Most ship molders don’t get to get this kind of firsthand information.  Thanks for all the pictures.  The Hoga.pdf was new to me.  I’ve been searching the web for about ten years and have pictures of twenty of the Woban class tugs but had not heard of the Woyot.  Do you know how many were in the class?

 

I hope to start cutting wood soon.

 

Bob

 

Bob I think that there is a list of each class built, I think I might have it but will have to dig...be nice to find a set of lines for one.  as I stated before I was stationed on YT150 in Norfolk during the mid 60 and the reason for my research into her was to construct a model too. I too came to a block wall when unable to find the lines for one.

 

Guy

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Bob if you have not already checked this out you might want to go here  http://modeltugforum.com/index.php?PHPSESSID=rtdjmf9mdd92rulqp6g8rmsl97

this is a tug Forum. it appears you have to register to view pictures and downloads.

 

Also check out this site http://www.navytugs.com/ it list US Navy Tugs

 

Below is from DANSF (haze Grey)

 

(YT - 146: dp. 325; l. 100'; b. 25'; dr. 9'7")

 

Hoga (YT-146), a diesel-powered tug, was launched by Consolidated Shipbuilding Corp., Morris Heights, N.Y., 31 December 1940; and placed in service 22 May 1941.

Hoga served during World War II as a harbor tug in the 14th Naval District, and was reclassified YTB-146 15 May 1944. She was loaned to the city of Okland [sic; Oakland], Calif. in June 1948, and serves at present as a harbor tug into 1967. She was reclassified YTM-146 on 1 February 1962.

 

Your Tug was built at Consolidated  but all the deminsions  and the class appear the same and were more than likely built off the same plans.

 

This might be a good contact: Yves HUBERT (hubertypc@aol.com)

 

And this site:  http://www.navsource.org/archives/14/08146.htm

 

Hope this helps but still no lines drawings! I will be following your build with interest and if I can locate the pictures I have of YT150 I will foward thim on. I have several other builds and projects in process so my time will be limited to your research

 

Guy

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Guy,  Thanks for the information every little bit helps. 

 

I have the building information on the kits that have been made over the past few years and the more I study them the more I realize none of them match what little there is on the Nokomis drawings.   So I am going to try and make my own line drawings from the Nokomis pdf.  I don’t know if I can do any better than they did but if nothing else I will have better knowledge about the proper shape.

 

Looks like the sawdust will have to wait a little longer.

 

Bob

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I never actually got around to posting in the Y'all log, but it turned out beautifully Bob.

I'm really intrigued by Tugs and a fire tug is even better, but a fire tug that actually lived through Pearl is an amazing choice for a build. I love the uniqueness of your builds

IIRC the Yawl was just a picture made 3d by gifted hands. As my father is ex-navy the naval aspect and significant role she played in one of life biggest human dramas really makes this quite a special build. I admire your skill and choice of such an unusual build. I'm looking forward to see your research become real. 

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Well Bob it looks like you have me hooked! I have to find a set of lines plans now!

 

Click on the web page and go about three quarters of the way down on the table for Consolidated shipbuilding and you will see the hoga listed there. It appears they built 4 of the Woban class yard tugs. It wouod be nice to have a picture of them in the yard

 

http://www.shipbuildinghistory.com/history/shipyards/6yachtsmall/consolidated.htm

 

The boats shipyard Consolidated Shipbuilding Corporation

post-1091-0-34875700-1378078454_thumb.jpg

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Keith,

 

Thanks for your kindness.  I have not commented much on your Swift but you have amazing skills yourself.

 

The Hoga was such a special boat and there are so many Navy men on this forum, I only hope I can do her justice.

 

Bob

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Hi Bob

 

 This should be a fascinating project which I will follow with interest.  A lot of people are fascinated by tugs - I spent 30 years on them!

Attached is a 1970s pic of the tugs I started on in CapeTown - there were four, all steam powered, two were coal burners and two were oil fired.  The last one was only scrapped around 1998 (I think).

Like you I've made models of tugs and IOMs but lately the "dark side"of static models has grabbed me.

 

 Pierre

post-4615-0-53434100-1378139932_thumb.jpg

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Pierre,

 

Welcome to MSW and with all your experience with tugs, don’t be afraid to jump in if you see me doing something wrong.

 

You need to start a build log of your Endeavour so we can share more.

 

Bob

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Hi Bob,

I thought I would tag along for the build.  I am getting more and more interested in scratch, or at least Bashing, and I have appreciated your thoughts on other threads.

Richard

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