flying_dutchman2

Intricate details of insects

39 posts in this topic

Both plants and insects are my favorite organisms and have been interested in both of them starting at the age of 5 when I lived in the tropics.  Through out the years and countries I collected many insects and in the 70's started producing slides (ASA 25 and 64=very little grain). Couple of years back switched over to digital.  Furthermore, my grad degree is in the field of plant physiology, soil chemistry and insect physiology.

 

So here are some insect shots.

1- Damsel fly on Hydrangea quercifolia (Oakleaf hydr.)

2- Aphids on milkweed plant.

3- Caterpillar (I think a hawk moth and 4 in. long) on Virginia pine.

4- Lady beetle eating aphids (this shot was taken under a dissecting microscope).

5- Painted lady on Aster d.

6- Pandora sphinx moth (Eumorpha pandorus).

7- Praying mantis on Canna flower.

 

Marc

I like the praying mantis picture:  "hey, did I give you permission to make a photo???

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Here are a few more of mine.

 

original.jpg

 

Close up shot to show pollen sticking to feet. This was taken years ago, when I was still toting a Canon 20D. I had to crank up the ISO to 400 to get any background in. My new DSLR (Canon 5D Mk.3) can handle ISO 400 with aplomb, but the old DSLR shows obvious grain:

 

original.jpg

 

Another picture of the same insect in flight. It is not easy to get a picture of a flying insect, and you would think I had an enormous amount of luck or skill ... but in reality the common name of this insect is hoverfly. They stand still in the air for a couple of seconds, and if you are lucky you can fire off a couple of shots in that time. You still have to be quick though!

 

original.jpg

 

 

"Insect Stripy to base - insect Stripy to base - permission to land please - permission to land please!"

 

Amazing shots!

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Hans,

 

   Your skill with the camera is outstanding. I have a Cannon EOS Rebel T5i which I bought about 8 months ago and wish I could take pictures half as good as you. I am learning a little at a time. You have any tips for a newbie such as me.

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Hans,

 

   Your skill with the camera is outstanding. I have a Cannon EOS Rebel T5i which I bought about 8 months ago and wish I could take pictures half as good as you. I am learning a little at a time. You have any tips for a newbie such as me.

 

To be honest - these pictures are not mine - please don't credit me for anything I haven't done. I'm only that "smart guy" who is making funny remarks.

 

Although I can give you some tips about photography. 

- Diafragma - if this is adjustable : large figure (f/22)is small diafragma and gives you a wide range of depth of focus in which you have sharp details.

 But the shuttertime will be longer, so your insect has flown away before your camera has stopped with its action. Result: blurry picture

- Other way round: small figure (f/2 or so) is great diafragma - much light - short shuttertime. Catch the insect in a flick of the eye - but disadvantage: less depth of focus. This gives the nice pictures with the blur flowers and the highly detailed insect, but it is difficult to get the insect sharp.

 

The best way is to switch your camera to manual and start to make pictures in diffirent shuttertimes, diafragmas etc.  and then just practice!

 

This is a lot easier nowadays without having film with only having 36 pics on it. 

 

And if you have a good camera - crank up the iso to 400 or more. This makes the chip more sensitive for light without starting to be pixelled.

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Thank you Hans. I will give the last one a try and see what happens. Your right about being able to take all the pictures you want and then just delete them and start over, also you get to look at them right then and there.

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Hoi Marc,

 

Yes, my time as a "guest" with the Jap Imperial Army was indeed from 1942 till August 1945.  Unbeknown to most is that in 1943 the Jap High Command in Tokyo issued an order that all internees are to be considered combatants and placed under the care of the Kempeitai, the Japanese equivalent of the Gestapo.  The Gestapo were pussiecats compared with the Kempeitai though.  That means that all internees came under military law and procedures.  Thus, all men, women and children were now in effect POW's.  I was 8 years old in 1942 and 12 when we were liberated.  Thanks to the two atom bombs we survived.  Another thing most don't know is that the Jap High Command issued an order in 1945 to exterminate all POW's in September 1945.  Yes, I have a copy of that order.

 

So, my age was deceiving, I'll be 80 next year April 15, hurray :)

 

Thanks for the URL, I love those boats.  I have the lines of a few of them, boeiers, hoekers, schokkers and aak.  They are beautiful boats.  Love to make a large model of a boeier, someday :)

 

Piet,

 

I gave this story a like, although there is in fact nothing likely in it.  I think it is good you shared this. Although being "some" time ago I can imagine you can remember much of it in almost every detail. My father will celebrate his 80th birthday next year (21st of April) as well and he has some storys about WWII as well.

 

We have some books about WWII here, and as a boy I was quite interested in the story of dropping the first atombomb on the 6th of august. I still think it's an extraordinary story, with on one side good (if  you can call it good) results, but on the other side also not...

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Thanks for the like Hans.  I understand that it simply means you have read the story and sympathized with me.  Yes, they were traumatic times that'll be with me till I die.  Not only the days as "guest" of the Emperor but also the weeks and months after the Japs opened the camp gates.  

 

That;s when the Indonesian Republican freedom fighters set out to kill every belanda (white face).  The camp I was in at Banjubiru was attacked with mortar and machine gun fire.  This was repelled by the few British Sikh soldiers.  I then moved to Ambarawa camp 6, which was also attacked with mortar and machine gun fire.  That's when I was almost killed by a mortar cartridge.  Fortunately the concussion of the explosion forced my backwards and the cartridge fall on the spot where I stood.

 

Oh my, sorry folks for getting carried away on this day of remembrance 9-11.

 

Piet.   

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It's not only 9-11 to remember - 6th of august 1945 - recent plaincrash in Russia - and all the other days when people gave their life in action or who died because of aggressiveness

 

When it comes to war or aggressive behavior there is nothing good about it. We have to remember al the people  that have died over the years - defending the borders of their country - harmless citizens - anyone who had not have to be a victim....

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