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Intricate details of insects

insects plants

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#16
avsjerome2003

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dang_08_big.jpg

Amfioius, Australia has the distinction of having the most poisonous spider in the world. One bite from the Sydney funnel web spider can be fatal if left untreated.

 

Photo from Wikipedia

 

Montani semper liberi Happy modeling to all.

    Crackers    :huh: :( :o



#17
KeithW

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Yes Jerome, I know about those spiders. I am a MD after all ;) We also make a distinction between "venom" and "poison". Venom is something which the creature injects, and poison is something you ingest. For example, a plant can be poisonous, Japanese pufferfish is poisonous (but not venomous). On the other hand, cobras and copperheads are venomous (but not poisonous).

Since we are posting pics of insects, here is a picture of a greedy little bee which I managed to catch in glorious detail:

original.jpg
  • Anja, mtaylor, avsjerome2003 and 3 others like this
Regards, Keith

gallery_1526_572_501.jpg 2007 (completed): HMS Bounty - Artesania Latina  gallery_1526_579_484.jpg 2013 (completed): Viking Ship Drakkar - Amati  post-1526-0-02110200-1403452426.jpg 2014 (completed): HMS Bounty Launch - Model Shipways
post-1526-0-63099100-1404175751.jpg Current: HMS Royal William - Euromodel

#18
Q A's Revenge

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Nice detail and lovely colours!

#19
avsjerome2003

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BeesPosterproof_small_forweb1.jpg

 

Amfibius, thank you for the definition of the words "venom" and "poison". I thought the words were interchangeable.Only a doctor can make this distinction.

Turning to another subject matter, I wonder if Australia has the severe problem of bee colony collapse. This is where worker bees abruptly disappear, causing a severe crisis that threatens the health of honeybees and the stability of commercial beekeeping and pollination.

As yet, no answer has been determined. Different theories have been proposed, including viruses attached to bee mites, predators, pollution, or pesticides. European beekeepers report the same conditions.

 

Photo by Huff Post

 

Montani semper liberi  Happy modeling to all.

   Crackers  :piratebo5:


  • Marcus Botanicus likes this

#20
Sjors

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Q A's Revenge,

 

What kind of camera are you using ?

And I think you are using a tele macro lens ?

 

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#21
Q A's Revenge

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Q A's Revenge,
 
What kind of camera are you using ?
And I think you are using a tele macro lens ?
 
animaatjes-sjors-94584.gif

Quite an old one now, a Pentax K5 with a Tamron 90mm Macro lens.

#22
KeithW

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Here are a few more of mine.

original.jpg

Close up shot to show pollen sticking to feet. This was taken years ago, when I was still toting a Canon 20D. I had to crank up the ISO to 400 to get any background in. My new DSLR (Canon 5D Mk.3) can handle ISO 400 with aplomb, but the old DSLR shows obvious grain:

original.jpg

Another picture of the same insect in flight. It is not easy to get a picture of a flying insect, and you would think I had an enormous amount of luck or skill ... but in reality the common name of this insect is hoverfly. They stand still in the air for a couple of seconds, and if you are lucky you can fire off a couple of shots in that time. You still have to be quick though!

original.jpg
  • Anja, Sjors, Per and 4 others like this
Regards, Keith

gallery_1526_572_501.jpg 2007 (completed): HMS Bounty - Artesania Latina  gallery_1526_579_484.jpg 2013 (completed): Viking Ship Drakkar - Amati  post-1526-0-02110200-1403452426.jpg 2014 (completed): HMS Bounty Launch - Model Shipways
post-1526-0-63099100-1404175751.jpg Current: HMS Royal William - Euromodel

#23
Jim Lad

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Hmmm!  Fly insects sort of makes flying birds look like a piece of cake! :)

 

John



#24
Marcus Botanicus

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I should have titled this thread: "Intricate details of small organisms" because we have both amphibians and arachnids besides the original title (Insects).

Don't get me wrong, I like close ups from lots of wild life, but I will always prefer insects.

That was my 2 cents.

Marc


Past builds: Several Tjalk's - Dutch flat bottom boats.  HMS Bounty.  Royal Dutch Yacht "Mary" (heavily bashed).
Gluing the frames and sanding them just a bit. Statenjacht 'Utrecht'.
Research, CAD drawings of the The Ships of Abel Tasman"; 1st the yacht 'Heemskerck' & 2nd the fluyt 'Zeehaen'.
In between all this, build a R/C pond yacht "Soling 1".
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Member & Secretary of the Nautical Research Guild (NRG).

#25
avsjerome2003

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orchid-manis.jpg?ve=1

 

The orchid mantis resembles a flower to lure insect prey. This mantis lives in the rain forest of Southeastern Asia in Malaysia.

 

Photo by Facebook

 

Montani semper liberi  Happy modeling to all.

    Crackers ;) :)


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#26
avsjerome2003

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2834629229_86d5d7aff8.jpg

 

Head of a praying mantis.

 

Photo from Flickr

 

Montani semper liberi   Happy modeling to all of you.

   Crackers     ;) :)


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#27
robin b

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Wonderfull photos of amasing creaturs, much enjoyeded seeing them .robin b
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#28
Marcus Botanicus

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Because Insects are my favorite organism, here are some Facts about them, not to gross you out but to educate you.  Western society tells us it is disgusting to eat insects.  But it is OK to eat shellfish. Shellfish and insects are under the same Phylum; Arthropoda.  I ask this question all the time to people who dislike insects but love lobster (I tend to annoy people with this question all the time). 

 

Insects in all their forms provide essential protein for about 2 billion people around the world.

One serving of caterpillar has MORE protein that a serving of beef.

Most insects are vegetarian.  Unlike the meat we eat which is filed with GMO's and antibiotics.

You never hear on the news that 10, 000lbs of insect meat has to be pulled off the shelf because of Salmonella.

 

Benefits of Eating Insects

The benefits of consuming insects are multifold, starting with the fact that they're good for you. Consider the following: 100 grams of crickets contains 121 calories. Only 49.5 calories come from fat. Where you really see the nutritional value is in the 12.9 grams of protein and 75.8 milligrams of iron. They also have about 5 grams of carbohydrates.

 

If you're watching your figure and want to cut down on the carbs, go with a silk worm pupae or a nice steaming bowl of termites. Neither of these has any carbohydrates, and they're both great sources of protein and calories. But if it's protein you seek, look no further than the caterpillar. These little fellows pack a walloping 28 grams of protein per 100 grams. They're also loaded with iron, thiamine and niacin. You may know those last two by their more common names -- vitamins B1 and B3.

Paragraph quoted from National Geographic and from my "How to cook with Insects".

ROME -- The latest weapon in the U.N.'s fight against hunger, global warming and pollution might be flying by you right now.

Edible insects are being promoted as a low-fat, high-protein food for people, pets and livestock. According to the U.N., they come with appetizing side benefits: Reducing greenhouse gas emissions and livestock pollution, creating jobs in developing countries and feeding the millions of hungry people in the world.

Some edible insect information in bite-sized form:

 

WHO EATS INSECTS NOW?

Two billion people do, largely in Asia, Africa and Latin America, the Rome-based U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization said Monday as it issued a report exploring edible insect potential.

Some insects may already be in your food (and this is no fly-in-my-soup joke). Demand for natural food coloring as opposed to artificial dyes is increasing, the agency's experts say. A red coloring produced from the cochineal, a scaled insect often exported from Peru, already puts the hue in a trendy Italian aperitif and an internationally popular brand of strawberry yogurt. Many pharmaceutical companies also use colorings from insects in their pills.

 

PACKED WITH PROTEIN, FULL OF FIBER

Scientists who have studied the nutritional value of edible insects have found that red ants, small grasshoppers and some water beetles pack (gram-per-gram or ounce-per-ounce) enough protein to rank with lean ground beef while having less fat per gram.

Bored with bran as a source of fiber in your diet? Edible insects can oblige, and they also contain useful minerals such as iron, magnesium, phosphorous, selenium and zinc.

 

WHICH TO CHOOSE?

Beetles and caterpillars are the most common meals among the more than 1,900 edible insect species that people eat. Other popular insect foods are bees, wasps, ants, grasshoppers, locusts and crickets. Less popular are termites and flies, according to U.N. data.

 

ECO-FRIENDLY

Insects on average can convert 2 kilograms (4.4 pounds) of feed into 1 kilogram (2.2 pounds) of edible meat. In comparison, cattle require 8 kilograms (17.6 pounds) of feed to produce a kilogram of meat. Most insects raised for food are likely to produce fewer environmentally harmful greenhouse gases than livestock, the U.N. agency says.

 

DON'T SWAT THE INCOME

Edible insects are a money-maker. In Africa, four big water bottles filled with grasshoppers can fetch a gatherer 15 euros ($20). Some caterpillars in southern Africa and weaver ant eggs in Southeast Asia are considered delicacies and command high prices.

Insect-farms tend to be small, serving niche markets like fish bait businesses. But since insects thrive across a wide range of locations -- from deserts to mountains -- and are highly adaptable, experts see big potential for the insect farming industry, especially those farming insects for animal feed. Most edible insects are now gathered in forests.

 

LET A BUG DO YOUR RECYLING

A 3 million euro ($4 million) European Union-funded research project is studying the common housefly to see if a lot of flies can help recycle animal waste by essentially eating it while helping to produce feed for animals such as chickens. Right now farmers can only use so much manure as fertilizer and many often pay handsome sums for someone to cart away animal waste and burn it.

A South African fly factory that rears the insects en masse to transform blood, guts, manure and discarded food into animal feed has won a $100,000 U.N.-backed innovation prize.

Details about the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization's work on edible insects at www.fao.org/forestry/edibleinsects


  • Piet likes this
Past builds: Several Tjalk's - Dutch flat bottom boats.  HMS Bounty.  Royal Dutch Yacht "Mary" (heavily bashed).
Gluing the frames and sanding them just a bit. Statenjacht 'Utrecht'.
Research, CAD drawings of the The Ships of Abel Tasman"; 1st the yacht 'Heemskerck' & 2nd the fluyt 'Zeehaen'.
In between all this, build a R/C pond yacht "Soling 1".
Member & Secretary of the Nautical Research & Model Ship Society of Chicago.
Member & Secretary of the Nautical Research Guild (NRG).

#29
Marcus Botanicus

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Turning to another subject matter, I wonder if Australia has the severe problem of bee colony collapse. This is where worker bees abruptly disappear, causing a severe crisis that threatens the health of honeybees and the stability of commercial beekeeping and pollination.

As yet, no answer has been determined. Different theories have been proposed, including viruses attached to bee mites, predators, pollution, or pesticides. European beekeepers report the same conditions.

 Entomologists and apiculturists (Beekeepers) have it down to the following.  Varroa mites, a virus-transmitting parasite of honey bees, have frequently been found in hives hit by CCD (Colony Collapse Disorder).  Lots of research money is going into this subject by the US Department of Ag and lots of big chemical companies.  People need to be more aware of this as this is critical to our food supply. 

 

Many people think of bees simply as a summertime nuisance. But these small and hard-working insects actually make it possible for many of your favorite foods to reach your table. From apples to almonds to the pumpkin in our pumpkin pies, we have bees to thank. Now, a condition known as Colony Collapse disorder is causing bee populations to plummet, which means these foods are also at risk. In the United States alone, more than 25 percent of the managed honey bee population has disappeared since 1990.

 

1-Bees are one of a myriad of other animals, including birds, bats, beetles, and butterflies, called pollinators. Cross-pollination helps at least 30 percent of the world’s crops and  90 percent of our wild plants to thrive.

2-Without bees to spread seeds, many plants—including food crops—would die off.

 

There is a person at my work that supplies home-owners with a bee hive.  I have the property size and plenty of nectar flowers.  I'm thinking of doing this in the coming year.  Boy, I would have several personal pollinators for my orchard.

 

Marc


  • avsjerome2003 likes this
Past builds: Several Tjalk's - Dutch flat bottom boats.  HMS Bounty.  Royal Dutch Yacht "Mary" (heavily bashed).
Gluing the frames and sanding them just a bit. Statenjacht 'Utrecht'.
Research, CAD drawings of the The Ships of Abel Tasman"; 1st the yacht 'Heemskerck' & 2nd the fluyt 'Zeehaen'.
In between all this, build a R/C pond yacht "Soling 1".
Member & Secretary of the Nautical Research & Model Ship Society of Chicago.
Member & Secretary of the Nautical Research Guild (NRG).

#30
Marcus Botanicus

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More insect pictures.

The first 3 were taken in my backyard in the US.

The last three were taken in the mid 80's in Trinidad, West Indies with a Pentax K2, 100 mm macro in the early morning hours, natural light, in the garden.

 

Male-Rhino beetle-Trinidad-WI

Hisperidae on soil-Trinidad-WI

 

Katydid on geranium leaf - Pentax K2, 100 mm macro bellows lens on a bellows with a ring flash ASA 64

Mating Antler Beetles -  Pentax K2, 100 mm macro

Skipper on mint flower. Digital

 

Longhorn beetle- (about 3 inches long)  Trinidad-WI -  Pentax K2, 100 mm mac

 

Marc

Attached Thumbnails

  • 26-Male-Rhino beetle-Trinidad-WI.jpg
  • 25-Hisperidae on soil-Trinidad-WI.JPG
  • 23-Katydid on geranium leaf.jpg
  • 24-Mating Antler Beetles.JPG
  • 22-Skipper on mint flower_resize.JPG
  • 27-Longhorn beetle-Trinidad-WI.jpg

  • avsjerome2003 likes this
Past builds: Several Tjalk's - Dutch flat bottom boats.  HMS Bounty.  Royal Dutch Yacht "Mary" (heavily bashed).
Gluing the frames and sanding them just a bit. Statenjacht 'Utrecht'.
Research, CAD drawings of the The Ships of Abel Tasman"; 1st the yacht 'Heemskerck' & 2nd the fluyt 'Zeehaen'.
In between all this, build a R/C pond yacht "Soling 1".
Member & Secretary of the Nautical Research & Model Ship Society of Chicago.
Member & Secretary of the Nautical Research Guild (NRG).




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