Long9Ron

H.M.S. Triton Cross Section by Long9Ron - Scale 1:48

147 posts in this topic

Nice Start Ron! I think the Triton is the best for first build. And you have a full support from the members of the MSW.

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I would say do not pay attention to the time it takes. Enjoy the accomplishment with each new part you make. Do a little at a time and before you know it, the frames will be installed.

 

Your first frame looks good. Nice work so far.

 

Russ

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Ron,

good start. You might want to leave a little more width on the frames to allow some room to move when fairing. It's easier to remove a little excess than to fill in low spots.

 

Regards,

Grant.

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Ron the first one is the hardest.Yours looks a whole lot better than my first one,which is in the scrap box. This learning stuff is really fun.I feel sorry for thoes that allready know it all. :P  :D     Larry

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Very nice start to your frames, looking good. As everyone has said, take your time and do each step and before you know it they are done. Looking forward to more

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Ron,

good start. You might want to leave a little more width on the frames to allow some room to move when fairing. It's easier to remove a little excess than to fill in low spots.

 

Regards,

Grant.

 

Sinan, Russ, Mark and Larry 

 

Thanks for the kind words. I think that I'm rushing too much. I just get excited and want to go, go, go. I must slow down.  :unsure:  

 

 

Grant

 

You know your 100% right. The thing is that this is all a learning curve for me. Learn as I go thing. Never have built a wooden model in my whole life. I think that my mistake was that I first cut out the pieces on the scroll saw and cut just outside the lines. Then I used the mini drum sander and sanded right down to the line and then I assembled the frames and sanded more, and in some spots the frames are to thin. I think that I should have roughly cut outside the lines and then assembled the frames and then sanded the whole frame to size. I think that I assembled the frames pretty sloppy also, which added to the situation. Some of the joints have a gap. I'm debating whether to use a sawdust-glue compound to fill the gaps or to live with it and maybe plank the whole section and leave no framing exposed.    

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Well I'm starting to slow down a bit and looking more at the detail of the work done. As this is my first build I have a lot to learn. Lessen learned to date...... SLOW DOWN AND CONCENTRATE ON QUALITY NOT QUANTITY.

 

I noticed that my frames were not up to my standards. I don't like to do a sloppy job, but I'm just learning and this is my first build. There were a few gaps in the frames and a few dents and such, but, I have decided not to redo them as they will be hidden anyway because I think I will do a full planking on the inside and out. But, I did decide that I would use a sawdust-glue mixture to fill in the gaps. Just to try and fix it up and to learn how to fix my mistakes as I go along. One reason why I decided to plank inside and out all the frames is because in my quick rush and inexperience, some places of the frames are too thin due to poor cutting and sanding. I believe that I can live and learn with that. Anyway, I have made the frames and filled in the gaps and I'm ready to mount them in the jig. 

 

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I'm also doing a little experiment on some wooden toothpicks. I have sanded some down to take off the shine and also cut off the ends and I'm soaking them in a dark walnut stain for a few days to see if the stain will penetrate into the core of the wood. I did do a small sample of the same but did not let them soak at all and I notice that the stain only coated the outside of the wooden toothpicks and not the inside. That was not good enough, so I thought that I would soak them for a few days to see what would happen. Will update later.

 

post-327-0-89983600-1363287584.jpg

 

Notice in the above picture, my zero insert for my scroll saw. It works a lot better now and doesn't break off the ends of the pieces when I cut them. 

 

Well back to work. Hope to have a few more pictures to post later. 

 

 

 

 

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Cool, - small gaps (especially with planking) can be covered by sawdust and glue to be almost invisible. Not so easy to cover frame issues though. Are you intending to use the toothpicks for treenails?? if so standard bamboo is easier to get to size and when stained because the end grain is showing it soaks up the oil and appears 'dark' automatically. If not then apologies as that will not have helped.

 

Joss.

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But, I did decide that I would use a sawdust-glue mixture to fill in the gaps.

 

Hello Ron!

 

I use small chips of the same wood to fill the gaps. I glue them with white glue and them cut them with a chisel or a shrarp file. Then I sand the joint. If the gap is tiny the sawdust will do the job.

 

 

 

Good luck with this.

 

Daniel.

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Hello Ron.I have been playing with stains for the toothpicks.I had no luck with stains.So I thought that a tree contains a lot of water.Why not use water based dyes.I made up a very strong solution of" TEA".Four tea bags to a small amount of boiling water.I then added the toothpicks and covered them with the tea bags.I let them stand till they sunk to the bottom,water logged.Took about six hours.I reheated the water several times in the microwave.Let dry(add sugar and milk makes a tasty snack :P  :P )I think the wood stores have wood dyes and there is Rit Dyes if you need a darker color.I have not tried these.

Larry

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Long9Ron likes this

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Joss, Daniel and Larry

 

Great ideas. I will have to put them all into my Things to Know Database. I'm not sure yet which way I will go. More testing to do. I also heard that a wood filler in the holes may be an idea.

 

Larry - What brand of tea did you use. Earl Gray?  :D    

 

Thanks

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Ron,It was orange pekoe and pekoe cut black tea.I'm brewing up a batch now.250 toothpick halves.My hull will be off white so these work perfect for me.  Larry

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Larry

 

Thanks for the tea idea. I will have a cup while I think about it.  :)

 

I mounted my frames today and decided to do the treenails on them using plain old wooden toothpicks.

 

Frames mounted.

 

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Treenails installed by freehand. Not to good. But, they won't be visible later. 

 

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Sanded down and ready to mount the Keelson.

 

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More pictures to come after I do a little more work. 

 

 

aykutansin likes this

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That is good progress. My only observation is to make sure that the slot for the keelson is lined up well before you install the keelson.

 

Russ

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I have soaked the wooden toothpicks in Dark Walnut stain for a week now and just looked at them today. It seems that the stain has soaked right into the core of the wood.

 

post-327-0-32210200-1363554153.jpg

 

I might end up soaking a bunch and use them in my build. Haven't decided which way to go as yet. Natural or dark?

 

While the toothpicks were soaking I worked on my frames. Which in my opinion are not very good, but I will be using them the way they are. You can see where I filled in the gaps with a sawdust-glue mixture and some other sloppy areas. But, overall I think they will work and I think I will not have any of the frames showing in the end product.

 

Sorry for the quality of the pictures, taken with my cell phone. 

 

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I have also cut some lumber for the inside planking and have my beams cut. I will be soaking the beams and bending them soon. After I do some inner planking and treenails of course

 

That's it for now.   :)  

harvey1847 likes this

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The walnut on the toothpicks turned out very nice.  It is not to light or to dark (just enough contrast to know it is there but not draw away from the rest.

 

And your frames look really nice. :dancetl6:   Hope mine turn out half this good.  Keep up the good work and looking forward to more.

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Ron,

 

I like the toothpik which has nearly the same cilor as your frames. After finishing the hull they will be light darker then the planking.

For my HMS Fly I use Pear for the frameing and also pear for all treenails in this part of the build

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I'm with Christian.. the ligher one.  But it's your build and you're the Captain.  Go with what your heart says.

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On treenails it depends very much on the sort of effect you are after. If you are extremely accurate with your treenail placement then a very dark colour can be very striking. If you are not that accurate then the very dark colour just draws the eyes to any mis-placed nails. If this is the case then lighter is better (less is more..)

 

So look at what you like visually, effect on others and potentially placement accuracy.

 

Coming along nicely though.

 

Joss

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Your frame line up is looking good and like the way that you kept the false keel long so you could screw it down tight.

 

Later 42rocker

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Thank you all for your kind words and advice.

 

I think that I will go with the Natural color of the toothpicks. If my frames were of a darker color wood then I might go for the stained walnut, but my wood is very light, so I think the best one for now is the light one. As Joss said, they may stick out as a sore thumb if I don't line them up correctly and being my first time at treenails that would most likely happen. Maybe when I get a little more experienced at it I will use a darker treenails.  

 

Have to pick up some drill bits before doing any treenails.  

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Great idea on tea bags to stain

 

I can't take the credit for that great idea. It was Larry's idea for the tea bag staining.

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yes i understand Larry's idea, and bty great looking build

I can't take the credit for that great idea. It was Larry's idea for the tea bag staining.

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Long9Ron: Thanks again for your help tonight.

 

I will spend more time in your thread but what I've seen so far the cross section is looking great. I also see there are many good suggestions from those following along. I'm working on a gantry building board and hopefully it will be ready to put to work before to long. The Triton Cross Section is beginning to look like a good candidate to run the first shake down with.

 

 

Cheers :)

Edited by Paddy

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Just a little more to post at this time. I have been cutting my lumber to size for the planking and such and have the beams cut to size.

 

I made a little bending jig by gluing the frame drawing to a piece of wood and hammering finishing nails along the beam edge and then I soaked the beams in hot water for about an hour and mounted them in my bending jig. I will let them dry for a day or two before removing them from the jig. I think it will work just find. When that is done I will repeat the whole process for another set. Thanks to Snowmans idea.

 

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Hope I don't get any mold on the wood or I will have to do the old bleach trick on them.

 

Well, back to work, still making planking..     :)  

 

 

Pete38 and sonicmcdude like this

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Nice set up for bending the beams,   I wonder should one overbend the beams some to account for any spring back to original shape, or will it dry enough to maintain the shape in the jig??  Will wait and see :)

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