Chuck Seiler

Continental Gunboat PHILADELPHIA by Chuck Seiler - Model Shipways - 1:24 Scale (Enhanced)

260 posts in this topic

Greetings all....I'm back!!!

 

Model Shipways Kit (modified)

Scale: 1:24  1/2”=1’

Circa:  August-October 1776

 

    Happy Moon Day!!!  I am starting my build log on the 45th Anniversary of the Moon Landing....just because.  I don't actually plan on building until the first or second week in August, so I can do some summer stuff.  I will be doing some pre-build planning and I may add my thoughts here.

 

    I wanted to get started early so that my small but dedicated band of followers can find a seat.

 

    Background.  This will be the SECOND time I built PHILDELPHIA.  The first time I did so as a scratch build based on the Model Shipways plans.  I will refrain from going into why I chose PHILADELPHIA and save some bandwidth by giving you the link to my scratch build (if I can figure out how to do it). Chux scratch Philly.

 

    It was a fun build, but I had some challenges.  I have found that there was an additional sheet that comes with the model that does NOT come when you buy the plans separately.  This includes all the templates for bulkheads and other pieces parts.  Thanks alot Model Expo for not including that!!!  At any rate, it was an interesting build.  I entered it into the County Fair Design in Wood Exhibit (Scale model class) and actually got an offer to buy it.  By then, I was too attached to it to sell.  I offered to make a model from the kit, with boxwood and holly replacing the planking and primary exterior wood, as in the scratch.  I figured with the kit as a guide and my experience from the previous build, I could build it much faster and I could correct some problems...both with my build and what I perceived to be with the plans.  It also gives me an opportunity to work in a larger scale.  Some of those corners got really tight at 1/4" scale.

 

    History.  Again, so save bandwidth, I direct you to Philly History.  PHILADELPHIA and the history behind it is fascinating.  It (and its associated fleet, not to mention many of its adversaries) was built in a few weeks.  It 'lived' only a few months.  IIRC only PHILADELPHIA and ROYAL SAVAGE were the only two ships sunk during the battle, but within a week or two of the battle the entire American fleet was sunk, scuttled or captured-but it was considered a strategic American victory. 

 

post-1153-0-42404900-1405877540.jpg

 

    A century and a half or so later, it was discovered, raised and preserved.  It exists today, on display in the Smithsonian Institution.

 

post-1153-0-97303900-1405877568_thumb.jpg

 

NOW your interest is piqued, eh.  I think you REALLY want to go to Philly History and read more about it.  Other suggested readings include:

 

The Gunboat Philadelphia and the Defense of Lake Champlain in 1776. by Lundeberg, Philip K.  

The Gondola Philadelphia and the Battle of Lake Champlain. by Bratten, John R.

Benedict Arnold's Navy, by Nelson, James L.

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Greetings all.  Thanks for stopping by.

 

Pete, when are you getting back here to San Diego?

 

Bob,  Community build?  It's a bit pricey, but sure, why not.  I'll get a head start on this one, eh?

BRiddoch likes this

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I am building the same kit. I will watch Chuck closely and get some great knowledge! I am still in the study phase, identifying parts, sanding the laser marks etc.. Loved your scratch PHILLY! 

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Hopefully it will be large enough that I can actually get m fingers into the tight spaces.  I guess tha tis what tweezers are for, eh?

 

Yeah, I had to give it a try and see what the fuss Kurt was making was all about.

bebopsteve likes this

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    Prelude to Build.  I ordered the model shortly after I made the decision to build it.  I didn't know how long it would take to get to me.  I managed to get the last one available and it was at my doorstep in a few days.  I suspect Kurt Van Dahm's articles in "Ships in Scale" magazine is making this a popular kit.  Check of Model Expo site shows they have some back in stock.  Hopefully we will some more Philly builds pop up.

 

    I plan to hold off on the build until mid August.  (I wrote this in mid July, so it seemed like a longer wait, but mid August is almost here now.) 

I have taken the opportunity to start browsing through the plans and checking out the pieces-parts.  I went through the instructions, noting the flow and references to specific part numbers, then I located the parts, at least the ones in the start of the build.  I kind of want to just start building based on my experience with the scratch build, but I realize that it MAY be to my best interest to actually follow the instructions.  I know....it's a guy thing.

 

    I have mixed emotions on the instructions.  Some parts are very detailed and some parts are sketchy.  The instructions spend a couple paragraphs discussing lining off the hull for planking, use of battens, etc, then says 'but you won't need to do that since the bulkheads are already marked.  No worries...the beginner now understands better what these markings are and how you get them in future models.  THEN as it is discussing the planking process, it explains how to plank down to the wale, shift to the interior ceiling planking without a by-your-leave, then shifts back to planking the exterior.  Huh?  What?  Section headings would have been nice.  In general, it is good.

 

    This is a big beast!!!  At least from what I am used to.  I look forward to the build.  I have checked out Buccaneer Kurt's article Ships in Scale.  I understand he is contractually limited from doing a build log on Philly, but I hope he will chime in from time to time here.  Hey Kurt, your picture of the Philly next to Washington is backwards in the most recent article. 

 

    I'll see ya in a bit.

bebopsteve likes this

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Chuck,

 

I don't see where you've missed the spaces.   Hit the "edit" button at the bottom of the post and see if it lets you fix it.

 

BTW, When you start this, put it in the kit section. :)

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Hi Tim. Welcome aboard.

 

Mark, I meant to say spaces before and after the dash in my Build Log Title.  The edit button lets you edit the individual post, but I don't know of a way to edit the header/title.  I was re-reading Dan Vadas' notes on the naming convention and it appears I left out the spaces.

 

It is in the kit section.   ....already started....post #14.

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Ah... got it.  I forgot what section I was in... a senior moment.   Title fixed.  When you're ready... rock and roll sir.

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OK Chuck.... Let's get this show on the road!

Thought I was the only one crazy enough to build the same ship twice back-to-back.

I did build a 1:24th scale monster once, as a memorial project for my old high school coach. Talk about a monster! My favorite project of all time.

Looking forward to your progress updates.

 

Dave

bebopsteve likes this

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As much as I liked the Popeye Avatar, the Admiral convinced me (as always), that it didn't reflect my "sweet nature".....gharhar

So she decided my "Know when to hold'em....know when to fold'em" nature was more appropriate.

Speaking of which, tonight is my weekly poker night. Wish me luck.

 

Cheers

Dave

dgbot and mtaylor like this

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<Orchestral overture, waiting for the curtain to rise>

Getting ready to start the build, let me make a few points.

 

--Before starting the build in earnest, I strongly recommend checking the parts list and ensuring you have all parts before you begin.  It is frustrating to get to a certain point and find you are missing something.  Model Expo is very good at replacing missing parts.  Likewise, review the instructions/plans to see what parts you are going to need first, find them on the parts sheet then mark the numbers on the actual parts wood sheet, preferably on the part itself.  Kurt Van Dahm, in his “Ships in Scale” article, recommends marking ALL parts before starting.

 

--I will occasionally be referring to Kurt’s series of articles on the building of the PHILADELPHIA.  For copyright reasons, I cannot reproduce the articles, but I can point out helpful hints (I hope) and make occasional smart@$$ comments (Hey Kurt, your Haas painting is backwards) without fear of reprisal.  If you don’t already get “Ships in Scale” magazine and would like copies of this article, I believe they can be purchased directly from the magazine.  The articles are quite informative.

 

--The glue that I normally use is a yellow wood glue, normally Titebond.  White Elmer’s glue works well also.  There have been raging discussions about the value of one glue over the other, which I will not get into here.  I just find these glues to be the best overall.  As Kurt points out, if you mess up, 70% isopropyl alcohol works well to get it apart.  I will use other glues (CA or other) throughout the build if necessary.  I sometimes use CA as a tack-weld to hold something until the glue dries.  There will be other places where I am gluing metal to metal or metal to wood.

bebopsteve and mtaylor like this

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Look forward to watching you guys and your builds! It will help me with mine no doubt.

I have numbered all my parts as well. Also I take pictures of the plans, or sections of the plans on my phone and refer to those at the bench, that way the plan sheets are not in the way.

Chuck Seiler and dgbot like this

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    It is time to start, so let's start at the end.  What did he say?  Yeah, you heard me.  <Oh dear, Seiler is into the magic mushrooms again.>  Before I begin in earnest, I wanted to cover an area that I don't think is in the instructions and that I did not get to until almost last with my scratch PHILLY.  Mounting the model.  It is easier to worry about it now than later.  so we will......

 

    Good ol' Mike Lonnecker taught me to plan on how to mount your model early on and build accordingly.  I MAY have done that with PHILLY 1, but obviously not very well.  The support infrastructure I THOUGHT was there was not, so I ended up putting a couple big gobs of glue in the holes and gluing the model to the base for all eternity.

 

    My plan is to use wooden pedestals like I did before, except slightly larger.  I want to run a machine screw up the middle and screw it into a nut already mounted in the false keel.  Mounting these nuts just forward of the forward cockpit and aft of the aft cockpit seems to me to be the most logical choice. 

 

post-1153-0-88281200-1408300163_thumb.jpg

   Here is how it will kind of look once mounted.  As with Philly 1, I used a base board which will eventually be mounted to a larger board (which will be the base of the case).

 

post-1153-0-88448300-1408300174_thumb.jpg

   Aft pedestal just aft of the cockpit.

 

post-1153-0-70634200-1408300186_thumb.jpg

    Forward pedestal just forward of cockpit. 

 

    I would have preferred having the pedestals closer to the center but that would put them in the cockpits.  I didn't think the cockpits were deep enough to make this work well.  In retrospect, I may be wrong.

 

post-1153-0-88685400-1408300203_thumb.jpg

    Once I figured out approximately where I wanted the pedestals, I drilled the appropriate holes in the bottom of the hull. (Hey!!! Your hull bottom pieces are already glued together so you are NOT starting at the end.  Okay, you got me.)

 

    For me, it is easier to mark/cut the false keel based on the hole in the bottom that it would be to drill the hole based on the slot in the keel.

 

    I also want to take this opportunity to drill the holes onto the base board I will be using.  If I use the holes in the hull as a template, I should ensure the holes are lined up.

 

post-1153-0-27383600-1408300216_thumb.jpg

    I will eventually have to drill a hole up the center of each pedestal.  The screw will run up through the base, through the pedestal, through the 'floor' of the model and into a nut embedded in the false keel. 

 

    As it is, I will need to either cut away a small portion of the keel to accommodate the top of the pedestal, or sand the top of the pedestal to make it flush...probably the latter.  I will then have to cut away a portion of the keel to allow me to embed the nut and leave room for the screw.  I won't do this until I have the hole in the pedestal and can ensure everything lines up.

 

    I would have preferred flathead screws, but Home depot didn't have them that long.  I am investigating other sources.

rtropp, tigoe, mtaylor and 3 others like this

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Hey Chuck, just throwing things out there.

 

Don't know if these come small enough http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_2_11?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=hanger%20bolt%201%204-20&sprefix=hanger+bolt%2Caps%2C291 but hanger bolts would keep you from having to drill all the way through the pedestal.

 

You can also get these with wood threads on both ends.

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