Dan Vad

How I fix Boo-Boos and Oopsies (Mistakes) by Dan Vadas - Share your own "Fixes" here

81 posts in this topic

I have a boo-boo to share. I got new hobby lamps that have lots of joints for perfect light positioning. I had mine set sort-of low to keep out of my husband's eyes and went to move my Harriet Lane and I heard the disheartening snap of wood. The top section of my fore-mast had snapped off. Whose fault? MINE.

I knew that at less than 2mm thick, just gluing it would not do the trick.

CA_03241303072138-S.jpg

 

CA_03241303071720-S.jpg

 

so, here is what I did.

I found a piece of wire and a tiny drill bit to match

CA_03241303070296-S.jpg

 

and drilled a hole in the top of the mast and the bottom where the break occurred.

 

CA_03241303070857-S.jpg

 

Then I dabbed a tiny bit of gap-filling CA glue on the end of a piece of wire and inserted it in one end

 

CA_03241303071240-S.jpg

 

I added another dab of CA to the other end of the wire (now protruding from the mast), clamped it, and now it is allllll better.

DSC07192-S.jpg

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Thank you for sharing some of the missteps so new people can learn ( I wish I could say avoid but not that confident lol )

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Thank you, Thank you, thank your for sharing these solutions!! I can't tell you how much they are appreciated, both the information and the inspiration!

I didn't know that you could soften wood glue with isporopyl alcohol.  It will be very useful!

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Mending a boo boo is like taking your car to the auto body repair person, only you are the repair person. The rate is the same: time (effort) and material. If it is a labor of love your time is free which allows you to spend more on material. After doing a couple of dozen builds, I have accumulated quite a lot of excess material that wasn't used, I keep it all in a box that I refer to as the lumber yard. So most of the time material is free also.

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Danny,

 

    Now this is an excellent subject, which should be of interest to everyone. Thanks for making a tread about this. Will be interesting to see what others post about this.

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Nice save. Getting the hole centered in the mast is a real chore.

If you are like me and can't drill a hole in the end of a round item then try this jig. I have added some photos below to show making the jig from hardwood using basic tools. Normally I would use steel rod for the jig and a drill press or lathe to produce it accurately.......but here goes....

 

My target is to drill a 1mm hole in the end of 2 mm doweling.

 

Start with a small block of fairly close grained wood:-

 

post-78-0-92074800-1365956393_thumb.jpg

 

Having filed the top and bottom square put it in the vice and drill right through with the smaller bit (in this case 1mm - though see later comment). I used a Dremel, without the drill press it is better to use a hand powered drill on a wooden jig - less fierce.   

 

post-78-0-24593000-1365956396_thumb.jpg

 

Now put the larger bit (in this case 2mm) in the drill and using the existing hole as a pilot drill in about 2mm. The larger bit will follow the smaller hole concentrically so long as you don't drill too far.

 

post-78-0-75907300-1365956397_thumb.jpg

 

You will now have a block with a small hole right through:

 

post-78-0-35937900-1365956399_thumb.jpg

 

....with a larger concentric hole on the opposite end. Notice the hole is not in the centre of the jig. This does not matter as long as the two holes are concentric.

 

post-78-0-80853700-1365956400_thumb.jpg

 

In this case I put some 2mm dowel in the vice, it could be the top of a mast, etc. Now put the jig larger hole down on the end of the dowel. It should be a good push fit and not sloppy. 

 

(contd)

tarbrush, Kevin, dafi and 8 others like this

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post-78-0-63745000-1365957573_thumb.jpg

 

Now with the smaller (1mm) bit in a hand drill push the bit through the jig and drill in to the end of the dowel.

 

post-78-0-19879700-1365957575_thumb.jpg

 

The next photo shows the hole produced (bit out of focus I am afraid) which is pretty much in the centre of the dowel. 

 

post-78-0-47844400-1365957576_thumb.jpg

 

When drilling the first hole through a wooden jig it is better to select a smaller bit than the target eg in this case a 0.8mm bit. Then when the 1 mm bit is pushed through it will be held firmly and not wobble about. Obviously having used a wooden jig once it is best to throw it away.

 

If you have a drill press so much the better. You can use steel for the jig, plus a machine vice can be clamped on the drill press so that the press ensures concentricity rather than relying on the bit following a pilot hole.

 

Ian M.

dafi, FredSC, druxey and 6 others like this

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Ian,

 

That's a brilliant idea! I assume you have several blocks for different size holes and different size dowels?

 

Thanks!

 

Harvey

 

Oh, one comment about using a drill press for the second hole. If the drill press and vise are stiff enough, won't the second hole follow the drill itself and not neccessarily the pilot hole? To me, the beauty of drilling it by hand is that the drill bit can self center on the pilot hole. The press and/or vise may not allow that.

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Harvey,

 

I make them as I need them. It took 2 minutes to make the one above - I was slowed down by taking photographs. :)

 

I prefer to make them on my lathe with the drill bits in collets but wanted to show it can be done without. With the drill press I clamp the machine vice so that it can't move, then as long as the jig under construction doesn't move the second bit should be in line. The best results using the above method is to use a mini drill for the hole right through the jig, but use a hand drill for the larger bit, you can then feel the bit following the pilot hole.

 

I used a variation on this when making wheels for the cannon on my Unicorn. The kit only supplied twelve wheels for 32 guns. :huh: At the time I did not have a lathe only a mini drill and press (Black and Decker). So I sawed off the wheel blanks from dowel. Next I clamped the machine vice on the press, put an off cut of wood in the vice and drilled a hole in the wood to match the outside diameter of the wheel blanks and just deep enough to accommodate a blank. Then without disturbing this wood or the vice, I put an axle size bit in the drill. The process then was to drop a blank in to the hole and drill the centre - I held the blanks down with a chicken stick to stop them rocking. Within 10 to 15  minutes I had 116 concentrically drilled wheels.   :D

 

Ian M.

Kevin, artitec3, tkay11 and 1 other like this

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Ahoy Mates :D

 

As someone whose log documents a plethora of mistakes, I would like to add my thanks to those who took the time to share their expertise “Thank You” :)

 

I was however, kind of thinking the mistakes would taper off a bit as my skills developed. It looks as if we just get better at making them.

 

 

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Fantastic thread.  Yet another reason to love this site!!  Thank you all for sharing.  This has been particuarly helpful to me as I am doing restorations!  Please keep the ideas coming!!

Thanks,

Mark

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Ian,

 

Could you post your dowel drilling tip as it's own thread.  I think this one deserves to be broken out as it's not really a "fix" as such.

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Rebate Cut on Wrong Side of Mark

 

Here's my latest Boo-Boo, and one I think a lot of modellers have done at least once.

 

I was cutting the Rebates for the Rudder Gudgeons on my Vulture. I'd marked the TOP side of each rebate and cut the lower four. The uppermost one was very difficult to get to in the normal position, so I turned the model up-side down (I have a special cradle for doing this).

 

Then I proceeded to cut the rebate - THE SAME WAY I'D DONE THE OTHERS - which of course was totally WRONG

goof.gif .
 
Unfortunately I didn't take a picture of my goof-up before I started fixing it, so just picture a big gap where there should be NO gap.
 
To fix the problem I cut a thin sliver of the same wood I'd made the sternpost from. Making sure the grain was running in the right direction I glued it in with PVA and let it dry thoroughly :
 
Gudgeons 001.jpg
 
A bit of careful sanding and NO MORE GAP :D  :
 
Gudgeons 003.jpg
Gudgeons 004.jpg
 
:cheers:  Danny

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I had used the saw dust a couple of times and done the broken masthead. But tnat was great to read. Thanks,

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The kit for my USS Constitution just said something like: 'bond the riding bits to the deck . . .'. So I did.

 

But when I belayed some lines to one of them, the post and file rail broke loose. 

post-246-0-20698500-1369265607.jpg

The way I fixed it was to epoxy a steel pin (brad nail) into a hole I drilled (about 1/4 inch deep) and drilled a similar hole through the deck. Some more epoxy into the hole and the thing should be a lot stronger than simply edge gluing a post to the deck.
BTW ignore the brass 'cover'; it represents the hole to lift gun powder up to the deck. The hole for the pin has a pencil mark.

 

post-246-0-62886500-1369265569.jpg

I may run into more as I go along with the rigging, but if I had to start from scratch the posts would be embedded with a square hole through the deck in the first place.

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The kit for my USS Constitution just said something like: 'bond the riding bits to the deck . . .'. So I did.

 

But when I belayed some lines to one of them, the post and file rail broke loose. 

attachicon.gifriding bits.jpg

The way I fixed it was to epoxy a steel pin (brad nail) into a hole I drilled (about 1/4 inch deep) and drilled a similar hole through the deck. Some more epoxy into the hole and the thing should be a lot stronger than simply edge gluing a post to the deck.

 

attachicon.gifriding bit 2.jpg

I may run into more as I go along with the rigging, but if I had to start from scratch the posts would be embedded with a square hole through the deck in the first place.

 

good to know Jay, I'll remember that one.

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Thanks for the tip Jay. I used to glue things to the hull (and nothing else), but the joint often failed. Now, for most deck furniture (especially if will get loaded later) I put a pin in like you did.

 

Harvey

flying_dutchman2 likes this

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Harvey, when I think about it, attaching some of the deck 'furniture' should be embedded. Our plans call for the hatch covers to be placed on 'beams' and the deck planking to go around them. But I think the fife rails and posts are even more important. Even Harold Hahn would sometimes leave part of a hull plank out and install the channels so they would be 'embedded'. I now make it a habit to install eyebolts that can be pulled out with epoxy rather than CA.

 

This is my first major model but I am learning a lot for my next project and this is one.

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Jay

 

I pinned mine with small brass pins. But thanks for the tip and I am sure it will help out other modelers.

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Same, small brass nails. I had the same problem on my rattlesnake. Also it works great when in staling the yards to the masts. It holds the yard in place while you wrap the rope around.

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A wise man learns from his misstakes. A genious learns from the misstakes of others.

I cant remember who said that but I love the thread.

Erik

 

That is why I am reading this at 1:16am! Glad to know I am not alone in the "what the heck did I do here?" club!

NenadM likes this

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The masthead snapped off clean at the collar, leaving the already attached rigging just hanging.

 

I had to strip off all the rigging for a start, then I carefully drilled a No.78 drill hole in each section of the mast and inserted a length of wire into the lower section, added some glue, and slipped the broken upper section back into place over the projecting wire - presto, just like a new one!John

I did the exact same thing with the Yacht "Mary" and the wire inserted ion both ends makes it look like new.

 

Marc

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Sanding hull tooo hardly, sometimes without thinking , and result is - too much thinned cutwater ( it has to be 4-4,5 mm and it is 3,5 mm). Also, bow must be redone by Campbell plans, so it is time to correct this boo-boo

 

post-4738-0-09899500-1390311837.jpg

 

after correcting bow, I added two layers on both sides of mahogany veneer thined more than a half to reach  "strong" 4mm

 

post-4738-0-12977600-1390311838.jpg

 

Little correction with putty in front and paint cover this boo at all. The rest will be covered with coopering

 

post-4738-0-47449600-1390311949.jpg

mtaylor and capnharv2 like this

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