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Launching ways

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There are contemporary examples of ways on a number of National Maritime Museum models. Check their 'Collections' site and search for 'launching ways'.

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If I am reading their site correctly and Google is translating the Italian correctly the larger kit is 144 Euro or roughly 164 USD but that includes VAT. Does anyone know what portion of VAT gets subtract when shipped out of Europe to USA?

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Thanks Mark ! I figured it out with a little help from Google. You are right it gets removed or you can file for a refund. The VAT is 20% for most of Europe it seems - 22% for Italy. So the 144 Euro w/ VAT is roughly 115 Euro without VAT. Would love to find a USA distributor!  But then from the pictures we could also try our hand at scratch building one ! :D

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Not sure what I'm doing wrong. I searched the site for modi di lancio (launch ways) hoping to find more options, but it didn't even pull up the launch we're talking about.

 

I don't see how that launch will keep a ship upright.

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Does anyone know how big those timbers under the rails (ones lifting it into an inclined position) would have been? Is it 6"x6" or 8"x8" or ????  That's an intriguing model. Should be too hard to build even without their kit.

 

Brian: They only showed two variations. one at 1:75 scale and one (I think) at 1:64 scale. I couldn't find any other views or info either, of course, I can't read or speak Italian either.

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... I don't see how that launch will keep a ship upright.

The keel was laid on blocks carefully levelled to an incline which were topped with 'splitting blocks' which later could be split and removed.

The ship was built on top of those, braces or shores being used to hold it upright during construction.  Drydocks have steps running along the sides specifically for these shores to stand on.

When finished, the cradle (reference the photo of the ship I posted) was built around and under the hull.  The tops were bolted to the hull with through bolts and wedged inside for easier removal after launch.  The bottom of the cradle passed between the blocks supporting the hull.  The rails were laid either side, with a little clearance to the cradle.  When all is ready, the splitting blocks are split and removed, lowering the hull and cradle down onto the greased rails.  A few of the shores remain to steady the hull.  The cross piece in your first pic is, I believe, part of the cradle and used to hold the hull in place until everything is let loose and with luck the ship slides down the ways, on the cradle and rails, and into her proper element.

Here is a pic of a drydock in Liverpool with a ship in it.

post-17589-0-15245900-1424302301_thumb.jpg

Some drydocks were totally floodable, as is the one in the pic.  Some were flooded by the tide so the range was limited and the ways inside had to be sloped.  That sort is a combination of drydock and building slip, a third type, we would call it a marine railway today, basically.  Today, large ships are built in totally floodable docks or even totally ashore and hauled onto a floating platform (floating drydock) on which they can be moved into deep water and floated off.

Photo of Nieuw Amsterdam, Harland and Wolff, 1906, built on the shore and launched down inclined ways.

post-17589-0-59098900-1424302812.jpg

robin b likes this

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The blocking might be up to 2 ft. square, as was the keel of a large ship.

I googled launching ways and slipway and found lots of pics.

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That's an awful lot of Euros for an American dollar. I think I'll try to make something like the one in the photo by jbsham.

 

I do have time yet, so if anyone comes up with anything else, I'm all ears. Said Ross Parrot.

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Joel,

 

I counted 16.  There might be 2 more under the white roofs (right center) and possibly the one under the HMS Victory label is a double...  ???

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I only find 13.  I don't see where your other 3 are, but 2 could be the large slip areas to the left of your white roofs, but zooming in with Google maps (yep, cheating) those don't appear to be dry docks, there is no gate mechanism that I can see.

 

Joel,

 

I counted 16.  There might be 2 more under the white roofs (right center) and possibly the one under the HMS Victory label is a double...  ???

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Busy place, eh?  Note the increasing size needed for steel ships.

I think 18.  1 under 'Victory' label, two covered slips just above label 'Fleet Way'.  The open area to the left of 'Victory' label is the entrance.

 

post-17589-0-02424300-1424311659_thumb.jpg

 

Mary Rose's house is the blimpish thing near Victory.  Warrior is tied up just off the bottom of the image.

trippwj likes this

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The blocking might be up to 2 ft. square, as was the keel of a large ship.

I googled launching ways and slipway and found lots of pics.

I checked one of my books.  The bottom of the 'stack' of blocking they say was 16" tall, by 2 to 3 feet wide, fore 'n aft, by maybe 4 or 5 feet long, athwartships.  They show the stacks to get shorter as the bow is approached, so the hull is more level than the ways.

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Joel,

 

I think Brian is about the one dock.  The one with the blue question mark is the one that hasn't any gates.  It might have been a drydock but it doesn't appear to be one now.  The two red question marks would be the covered docks you spoke of.

 

I wasn't sure, but I thought the one I've labeled "10" might have been a double with the other dock to the left.

 

So 17?

 

post-76-0-45633600-1424316806_thumb.jpg

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I would not order ANYTHING from Velieri Modellismo. I ordered a kit from this joker and he never sent it. Every email I sent him he had a new excuse to not ship the model (Away from office, on my way to the post office right now waiting for packing material etc). After 4 emails he stopped responding. I filed a complaint to Paypal and he didn't even answer them. This was the fastest refund I ever got from Paypal. Even Euromodel Como was quite annoyed with this bloke.

Jack12477 likes this

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Here are a couple of blowups:

 

Victory & vicinity

 

post-17589-0-29779900-1424370947_thumb.jpg

 

You can see, clockwise, Mary Rose's 'blimp', HMS Victory, WWI monitor M33.  Behind her closed gates a bridge over her entrance and a wharf with a current warship tied up.  M33 is in a single dock.

 

post-17589-0-01438000-1424371172_thumb.jpg

 

From the left:

Dried dock with ship, wet dock with bow on a float, 2 of what I take to be covered docks, wet dock with nothing in it.

I've marked with red the 'bridges' that can be placed across the ends of a drydock for traffic.  Note one is set to the side of the dock itself, but can be moved to close the opening in the dock.  The actual gates pivot into a recess in the side of the dock when open, see how M33s gates will fit into the sides of the dock.

mtaylor likes this

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Two more points and I'll let this get back to the original topic.

Note in the upper of my latest pics you can clearly see the steps in the side of the dock containing M33.

Portsmouth seems to have only docks, but if you go down the coast to Plymouth there are both drydocks and building slips evident.

mtaylor likes this

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