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Gallery of COMPLETED Scratch-built models


Completed Scratch Models

This Gallery section is for completed scratch models only. If you have any in-progress photos please post them in your logs or other appropriate forums. In progress photos will be deleted from albums as this gallery should not be used a duplicate build log. ONLY COMPLETED MODELS PLEASE. Thank you.

 

YOU MUST create an album for each completed model and upload your images in that album.  Do not just upload images to the gallery that are not contained within an album.  These will be deleted.   Thank you.

Albums

  1. 24' exploration gaff-rigged ketch by vaddoc - Scale 1:12, a Tad Roberts design Updated

    vaddoc
    Album created by by
    vaddoc Updated
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    • 12 images
    • 0 comments
    • 1 image comment
  2. Tenma-zukuri Chabune, Edo canal boat c.1800 - 1/20 scale, by catopower Updated

    The Tenma-zukuri chabune (ten-mah-zoo-koo-ree-chah-boo-nay) is small boat used on the canals and rivers of  the Japanese capital city, once known as Edo, now Tokyo. It's a one or two person boat, but there is little known information about it. I have found no references to the type. And, like just about all traditional Japanese watercraft from the early 1800s and earlier, there are no plans of any type. 
     
    The only information about the specific type comes from a book put together by the Shogunal government for the purpose to tax assessment. An illustrated book published in 1802 called the Funakagami includes an illustration of the type, along with general dimensions, and a table and illustration identifying the principle parts of the boat, though this may have been a later addition to the book.
     

     
    From this illustration and general measurements, I reconstructed the boat, creating a simple set of digital drawings from which to build the model from. The boat is similar to a type that is called a Tenmasen or Hakucho, which in the Edo area, was a cargo boat, and the name Tenma-zukuri chabune suggests there is some relationship, as it translates to "Tenma-style tea boat" (tea boats are a general class of small riverboat commonly used to sell food and drink to river goers). Knowing that there are a couple examples of Tenmasen remaining, I managed to acquire some photos of those to aid in the development of the drawings.
     
    After several revisions of the drawings, I and a fellow ship modeler in Japan, Mr. Kouichi Ohata, built our own models based on the final plan. His model was made in 1/10 scale, while mine was made in 1/20 scale. 
     
     
    My model is about 13-1/2" long, and represents a 21-foot boat, probably operated one or two people. The model is made from Japanese cypress, called hinoki, which I darkened using an aniline dye. Copper coverings were added, which I darkened by giving the whole model a vapor bath of liver of sulfur. The exposed ends of iron nails you see inside the hull were simulated using permanent adhesive-backed vinyl cut using a Silhouette Cameo machine.
     
    Finally, before spraying the whole thing with a coat of matte lacquer, the lower part of the hull was given a wash of black dye to simulate the wood charring that was done to the hull bottoms to make them more waterproof and rot resistant.
     
     
    catopower
    Album created by by
    catopower Updated
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    • 8 images
    • 0 comments
    • 0 image comments
  3. “Speronara”, maltese boat 1/150 Updated

    This is the last addition I have made to my collection. I have not published its construction process in the forum because, being similar to the one I have used in other models, I have the impression that it could have turned out without much interest.
    And now, by way of introduction, a bit of history: the “speronara” was a boat used mainly in Malta, although it was also present in Sicily. It had remarkable nautical qualities, mainly highlighting its speed, which is why it was frequently used by Maltese for smuggling. In addition to its curious and characteristic spur, this boat was lighter in construction than others of similar dimensions, such as the “bovo” or the “schifazzo”, which gave it a lower draft, which was undoubtedly one of the reasons why that smugglers preferred it, another reason being that this lightness allowed them to be easily beached on the beaches The function of the extension of the cutwater as a spur has given rise to various conjectures, which in the end are reduced to two possibilities: either it was a mere ornamental element or it was a reinforcement of the bow, both being valid and not exclusive explanations. A typical characteristic of the "speronaras" was the cabin, covered by a tarred cloth, which occupied a large part of the stern and which served to keep the crew of four or five men safe. They also stood out for being painted with bright colors The "speronaras" hoisted one, two or three sticks with a Latin candle, also carrying one or more jibs, although they could also be riggedThis is the last addition I have made to my collection. I have not published its construction process in the forum because, being similar to the one I have used in other models, I have the impression that it could have turned out without much interest by repetitive. And now by way of introduction, a bit of history: the “speronara” was a boat used mainly in Malta, although it was also present in Sicily. It had remarkable nautical qualities, mainly highlighting its speed, which is why it was frequently used by Maltese for smuggling. In addition to its curious and characteristic spur, this boat was lighter in construction than others of similar dimensions, such as the “bovo” or the “schifazzo”, which gave it a lower draft, which was undoubtedly one of the reasons why that smugglers preferred it, another reason being that this lightness allowed them to be easily beached on the beaches The function of the extension of the cutwater as a spur has given rise to various conjectures, which in the end are reduced to two possibilities: either it was a mere ornamental element or it was a reinforcement of the bow, both being valid and not exclusive explanations. A typical characteristic of the "speronaras" was the cabin, covered by a tarred cloth, which occupied a large part of the stern and which served to keep the crew of four or five men safe. They also stood out for being painted with bright colors The "speronaras" hoisted one, two or three masts with a Latin sail, also carrying one or more jibs, although they could also be rigged with a spritsail. It was frequently used for the transport of goods, passage and mail over short distances.
    Javier Baron
    Album created by by
    Javier Baron Updated
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    • 8 images
    • 2 comments
    • 2 image comments
  4. HMS BOUNTY LAUNCH scale 1:26 Updated

    Dali
    Album created by by
    Dali Updated
    • 18
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  5. Tancook Whaler by Brian Campbell Updated

    Tancook Whaler built from Howard Chapelle's lines in American Small Sailing Craft. 1/16 scale
    Brian Campbell
    Album created by by
    Brian Campbell Updated
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    • 9 images
    • 0 comments
    • 3 image comments
  6. Dutch Fishing Boat CSF16 Updated

    A scratch built homage to the fishing boats of Holland. I built it in between other builds over 14 months. 
    betamale
    Album created by by
    betamale Updated
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  7. Missouri River steamboat Arabia (1856), 1:64 Updated

    American "Western River" steamboat that operated on the Missouri River between St. Louis and the state of Montana. She was built in 1853 and sank in 1856 near what is now Kansas City, MO (more on her history here and here ). She was rediscovered in the 1980s, partially excavated, and became the subject of a beautiful museum near the Kansas City riverfront. This scratchbuilt model is based on the remnants on display at the museum and a fair amount of modeller's license based on other period vessels as no contemporary photos or drawings are known. The model was also built to follow a painting commissioned by the museum (which itself uses rather a lot of artistic license), since for better or worse this is the public image of Arabia. Build log here .
     
    Cathead
    Album created by by
    Cathead Updated
    • 12
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    • 3
    • 12 images
    • 0 comments
    • 3 image comments
  8. Great Republic 1853 1/128 scratch built by rwiederrich Updated

    Some images of my completed 4 masted Barquentine Great Republic an extreme clipper
    rwiederrich
    Album created by by
    rwiederrich Updated
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    • 6 images
    • 1 comment
    • 7 image comments
  9. Himi Tenma - Japanese workboat from western Toyama prefecture - 1/10 scale, by catopower Updated

    In the Fall of 2019, boatbuilder Douglas Brooks went to Japan, together with Nina Noah from an organization called the Apprenticeshop, and built two boats as part of a research project. The second of these boats was the Himi Tenma or Tenmasen. It is a small workboat use for fishing and ferrying people and things in coastal waters. Larger versions of this boat were often carried aboard the large coastal transports called bezaisen or sengokubune for loading and offloading cargo, passengers, and crew.
     
    This particular boat was only about 13 feet long and was built under the guidance of Japanese boatbuilder Mr. Mitsuaki Bansho. I was asked to build this model as a gift for one of the donors to the project.
     
    The model is about 15.5" long and made primarily from  sugi , or Japanese cedar. The light colored wood used for the beams, half-frames, stem, etc., is  hinoki , or Japanese cypress. The model isn't an exact replica, as I was provided with a museum drawing of a similar boat, some dimensions, and photographs. But, the photos didn't explain all the details and the museum drawing differed from the actual boat that was built. So, this model is more of a representative model that is pretty accurate to the type and very close to the one built in 2019.
     
    I started construction in mid-April and completed it just about 30 days later.
     
     
    catopower
    Album created by by
    catopower Updated
    • 9
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    • 2
    • 9 images
    • 0 comments
    • 2 image comments
  10. Hozugawa Downriver Boat - 1/40 scale, by catopower Updated

    In Japanese, this is a  保津川下り舟 or  Hozugawa kudari bune. It is a "downriver" boat, because these boats were traditionally run down the Hozu river and through the rapids to carry goods down from the mountains to the old capital city of Kyōto.
     
    In the old days, the nearly 40-foot long boats were then hauled back up the river, manually, by the boatmen wearing cloth harnesses attached to long ropes. They would hike the rocky shores of the river, 3 at a time, while a fourth boatman would stay on the boat or on the shore, pushing the boat away from the rocks with a heavy pole.
     
    This is how it was done for centuries on the Hozu river as well as many other rivers. You can see many Japanese woodblock prints where boatmen are depicted walked along a river, hauling on ropes to pull boats upriver. 
     
    This models is made from Japanese cypress, Hinoki, and is based on some drawings provided by boat builder Douglas Brooks. The last wooden kudari boat was specially built in 2009, the first wooden boat of its type built in 60 years. Today, the tour boat company that operates on the Hozu river, uses fiberglass boats based on this design. Sadly, the last wooden boat fell into disuse, was not maintained, and was broken up in 2019.
     
    These old wooden boats were particularly interesting in that the planking was not symmetrical. The bottom planks are made relatively short, and the floor planks closer to the bow are tapered. The planking arrangement is said to allow damaged planks to be more easily replaced. 
     
    My own model is something of a hybrid of old and new. I had to base construction on photos of the wooden boat, but some changes had been made since its construction to make it more easily used as a tour boat. I tried to avoid adding the more modern touches, but I had few references to guide me at the time. 
     
    I've since found photos of the boat when it was first put in the water in 2009. Plus, I now think I have a better understanding now of what was traditional and what was not.
     
    Edit: Just discovered this interesting (soundless) footage on Youtube that shows a boat being hauled up river and run down the river:
     
     
     
     
    catopower
    Album created by by
    catopower Updated
    • 8
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    • 8 images
    • 1 comment
    • 1 image comment
  11. Nuestra Senora Afortunado Updated

    Restoration of a model offered by Popular Mechanic magazine in 1926. Built in 1936 by Walt Hoffman, it was in disrepair and suffering from age
    Boxbuilds
    Album created by by
    Boxbuilds Updated
    • 4
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    • 1
    • 4 images
    • 0 comments
    • 1 image comment
  12. SHENANDOAH American Cutter 1804 Updated

    Here is the ship just finished, the plan was quite flawed
    2milimetra
    Album created by by
    2milimetra Updated
    • 10
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    • 10 images
    • 0 comments
    • 3 image comments
  13. Anatomy of a boat Updated

    School instruction model, intended to learn a landlubber (or a new naval recruit) the different parts of a boat. Based on the plans of the mackerel cutter 'Marie', a small sailing fishing sloop of the type which was used along the Breton coast (France) before World War II, drawn by Gerd Löhmann for the book 'Apprendre le modelisme naval' (a publication of Le Chasse Marée-Armen).
    G.L.
    Album created by by
    G.L. Updated
    • 10
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    • 10 images
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  14. Collection of traditional boats from the Vatican museum Updated

    Collection of traditional boats from the Vatican museum. They are ancestral vessels of all planet peoples.
    Forgive me for the unprofessional photos.
    Genésio
    Album created by by
    Genésio Updated
    • 93
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  15. São Gabriel Updated

    The first ship used by Vasco da Gama on his trip to India. Nau São Gabriel
    Genésio
    Album created by by
    Genésio Updated
    • 14
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  16. The Leif Eriksson kanarr Updated

    Genésio
    Album created by by
    Genésio Updated
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    • 11 images
    • 0 comments
    • 0 image comments
  17. Culé and Chata Updated

    Barco de água Acima roughly translates to "boat of the upper river".   It was designed to transport cargo from the shallow upper reaches of the Tagus River and via canals.
     
    The boat's tender is called a chata, which directly translated means 'flat', but in this context it means a flat-bottomed boat.

    It is my second wooden model, second model of any kind since I was a young teen, and the first built from scratch. Not counting glue and paint, the only commercial parts are the rigging line, the cloth, the chain, and about 13 small wire rings. I fabricated the remaining metal parts from brass sheet, rod, and tubes. The wood is poplar, holly, cherry, and pear from trees felled by storms or found by the road.
    gkharrin
    Album created by by
    gkharrin Updated
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  18. Model of frigate "freia" build 1828 for the Norwegian navy Updated


    crayfish
    Album created by by
    crayfish Updated
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    • 10 images
    • 7 comments
    • 1 image comment
  19. Scratch USS OHIO SSGN 726 Updated

    192 Scale USS Ohio SSGN version scratch built for her commanding officer
    torpedochief
    Album created by by
    torpedochief Updated
    • 4
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    • 4 images
    • 1 comment
    • 2 image comments
  20. HMS Victory by Manfred Burkert Updated

    This model of HMS Victory was built by Manfred Burkert between 1972 and 2012. Some of the pics show the model at the fair in Friedrichshafen in 2018. He is currently in negotiations with the international maritime museum at hamburg regarding the purchase of the model. So one can hope that the model will soon be presented to a larger audience.
    Cirdan
    Album created by by
    Cirdan Updated
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    • 11 images
    • 2 comments
    • 1 image comment
  21. 20-oar 42-foot longboat #1 of the 120-gun battleship “Twelve Apostles” - the flagship of Admiral Lazarev of the Black Sea Fleet 1841 Updated

    Gentlemen, with great pleasure I want to show a new model! 
    The model was built by Yura Kimborovich according only to our drawings by "MasterKorabel"
    Drawings we prepared on the basis of archival information of the 1840s.
     
    This is a 20-oar 42-foot longboat #1 of the 120-gun battleship “Twelve Apostles” - the flagship of Admiral Lazarev of the Black Sea Fleet.
    Date: 1841 -1855
    Sailing: the Plymouth bot.
    Art.: one 24-pound carronade. 80 shots.
    Crew: Midshipman, 160 marines and 22 sailors.
     
    Scale 1: 48
    length - 498.5 mm,
    width - 80 mm,
    height - 350 mm
    greenstone
    Album created by by
    greenstone Updated
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  22. Japanese Port Diorama Updated

    mhkash
    Album created by by
    mhkash Updated
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  23. Triton cross section by Edwardkenway Updated

    Cross section built using plans from MSW/NRG
    Edwardkenway
    Album created by by
    Edwardkenway Updated
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    • 8 images
    • 0 comments
    • 1 image comment
  24. Vitor Campos Updated

    vitorcampos
    Album created by by
    vitorcampos Updated
    • 14
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