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Gallery of COMPLETED Scratch-built models


Completed Scratch Models

This Gallery section is for completed scratch SHIP models only. If you have any in-progress photos please post them in your logs or other appropriate forums. In progress photos will be deleted from albums as this gallery should not be used a duplicate build log. ONLY COMPLETED SHIP MODELS PLEASE. Thank you.

 

YOU MUST create an album for each completed model and upload your images in that album.  Do not just upload images to the gallery that are not contained within an album.  These will be deleted.   Thank you.


Albums

  1. Pareggia Updated

    The “pareggia”, a typical Ligurian boat, was very similar to the “bovo”. In reality, the only relevant difference between them is in the position of the main mast: inclined towards the bow in the first case and practically vertical, in the second. The “pareggias” had a practically straight stem with little inclination, a round stern and a hull with quite full shapes as befits a cargo ship. Normally they did not exceed 20 m. in length with a displacement of 30-40 t.
    In the book “Les caboteurs et pêcheurs de la còte de Tunisie. Pêche des éponges”, by the frigate captain P.-A. Hennique, which describes and illustrates the vessels of different nationalities (Arab, Greek, Maltese, Sicilian ...) that this French Navy officer found in those waters in 1888, a “pareggia” appears, the Monteallegro di la Spezia, a boat of about 15 m. in length, 4 m. of beam and 1.25 m. draft. Hennique noted the resemblance of their rigging to that of the Spanish feluccas which he had frequently encountered on his voyages. In navigation, the dinghy was brought on board and placed on the deck. The crew consisted of six men, counting on the skipper.
    The “pareggias” were used to transport people and goods along the Ligurian coast, although they also undertook navigations to much more distant destinations. They had a reputation for being excellent sailboats, very adaptable and that they had very well at sea in any weather.
    Regarding rigging, the difference between that of the mainmast and that of the mizzen is noteworthy. In the latter, the halyard is placed upright, in the position in which it should be placed to pass it from one side to the other, so the halyard goes forward of the mizzenmast. On the other hand, on the mainmast, the halyard of the entena descends from the wedge and is located aft of the mast.
    Javier Baron
    Album created by by
    Javier Baron Updated
    • 10
    • 1
    • 3
    • 10 images
    • 1 comment
    • 3 image comments
  2. Galloway Cataract Boat "Glen" Updated

    Cataract Boat "Glen" used by the 1923 USGS Mapping Expedition of the Grand Canyon (Birdseye Expedition).  Lines sourced from the Library of Congress:  https://www.loc.gov/resource/hhh.az0578.sheet?st=gallery
    Original preserved and on display at the Grand Canyon National Park.  Modeled at 3/4"=1' in pine.
    Harvey Golden
    Album created by by
    Harvey Golden Updated
    • 6
    • 1
    • 1
    • 6 images
    • 1 comment
    • 1 image comment
  3. Amistad Schooner, 1839 Updated

    Scratch built 1:96 scale model of the infamous Amistad slave ship.  A basswood solid hull was carved and planked with basswood strips.  Basswood deck; bamboo masts and spars; and thin copper sheet were used.  The brick works are paper card.  I built this in the late 1990s, but do not think I have ever displayed it before.
    Gbmodeler
    Album created by by
    Gbmodeler Updated
    • 24
    • 0
    • 0
  4. Norwegian Whale Boat Updated

    Built to the plan, drawn by the late Mr Jules Van Beylen, former curator of the Belgian National Maritime Museum. The whale-boat is presented in a whaler davits according to the study by Eric A.R. Ronnberg, Jr.
    1/10 scale model.
    G.L.
    Album created by by
    G.L. Updated
    • 9
    • 4
    • 1
    • 9 images
    • 4 comments
    • 1 image comment
  5. Zephyr Steam Boat - Puget Sound, Late 1800's Updated

    This is a 1:96 scale model of the steamboat "Zephyr" which worked around Seattle, Washington.  Plans were drawn off photos of the actual boat, scaled from a man seen on the deck and assumed to be about 5'10" tall.  I built this model in the late 1990s but never posted it before.  The model is basswood planking on a solid, carved hull.
    Gbmodeler
    Album created by by
    Gbmodeler Updated
    • 19
    • 5
    • 2
  6. Chinese Junk (Fictional) Updated

    This is a scratch-built model in 1:98 scale of a fictional Chinese Junk.  Basswood planking over solid hull with cloth sails.  Built this for my wife several years ago, but never did a "photo shoot."
    Gbmodeler
    Album created by by
    Gbmodeler Updated
    • 16
    • 0
    • 2
  7. Vietnam Junk Ship Updated

    Hello everyone! cordially come from Vietnam ^^
    This is the boat I just completed. 1: 200 scale, built out of cardboard. In Vietnam, I call it "bat wing boat" because the sail is like a bat's wing, haha. Just kidding! This is a unique boat type of East Asia (China, Japan, Korea) and Vietnam. However, each country will have a different sail style. See more at my youtube channel :  https://bit.ly/3cPSoLR  
     
    quyen99sky
    Album created by by
    quyen99sky Updated
    • 17
    • 0
    • 2
  8. San Francisco Felucca Updated

    Scratch built at 3/4"=1' to lines in Howard Chapelle's "American Small Sailing Craft" (fig. 105). These were built and used around the Bay by immigrants from Southern Italy in the late 19th Century/early 20th. 
    Harvey Golden
    Album created by by
    Harvey Golden Updated
    • 3
    • 2
    • 0
    • 3 images
    • 2 comments
    • 0 image comments
  9. Misainier - French Fishing Boat, 1906 Updated

    This  is  a 1/48 scale model of a six meter (20 foot) Misainier fishing boat from 1906 named "Mirabeau."  The Misainier was an important feature of the French Atlantic Coast in the early part of the   20th century.   These little boats were usually 4 to   8 meters long,  single masted, lug rigged, and built by   individual s without formal plans.  Hundreds plied the coastal fishing grounds of Brittany until the mid 1900s.  A build log can be viewed at:  https://modelshipworld.com/topic/27766-misainier-by-gbmodeler-small-french-fishing-boat-of-the-early-1900s/
     
    Gbmodeler
    Album created by by
    Gbmodeler Updated
    • 16
    • 3
    • 1
  10. Dalmatian bracera Updated

    The bracera is a traditional coastal cargo sailboat from the Adriatic, originally from Dalmatia, whose origin dates back at least to the 16th century, when it first appeared in the chronicles. Together with its larger sister vessels, the Trabaccolo and the Pièlego, the braceras formed the backbone of the commercial fleet in the Adriatic Sea, with the single-mast being the most abundant and well-known, although there were also specimens of two and even three masts. The bracera was a solid and agile vessel, with a good load capacity, making it particularly suitable for trade and communication between the many islands of the Adriatic and the neighboring coasts. These boats were dedicated to the transport of wood for construction and firewood, mainly from Senj to the south and the islands, and also for the transport of salt, sand, wine, olive oil and everything that was produced on the islands, from Istria to Dubrovnik. In Istria they were also used for fishing and in Dalmatia for collecting sea sponges.
    Javier Baron
    Album created by by
    Javier Baron Updated
    • 12
    • 5
    • 1
    • 12 images
    • 5 comments
    • 1 image comment
  11. New England Stonington Dragger - 11" LOA Updated

    Stonington Draggers were among the first of the Western-Rig fishing vessels in New England.  These boats originated along the Connecticut coast and were named after the town where they became the dominant type.  The use of these boats spread to most Southern New England fishing ports in the early through mid 20th century.  This model depicts a vessel typical of the 1920's.
     
    A comprehensive build log can be found here .   Thanks for taking a look.
     
    Gary
    FriedClams
    Album created by by
    FriedClams Updated
    • 12
    • 7
    • 9
    • 12 images
    • 7 comments
    • 9 image comments
  12. La Niña - 1492 - Ship of Cristoforo Colombo Updated

    CRI-CRI
    Album created by by
    CRI-CRI Updated
    • 14
    • 0
    • 0
  13. MAS 15 1/350 small 3D Updated

    MAS 15 from WW1 , Italian torpedo boat, Luigi Rizo on June 10th of 1918 sinked with torpedo KuK battleship St. Istvan near island Premuda, Adriatic sea,  out of Zadar, Croatia, in that time Austrohungaric empire.
    The model is printed in resin from my drawings which I made thanks to data and fantastic model in 1/144 of Valerio Manlio Gai, Thetis models.
    Leo-zd
    Album created by by
    Leo-zd Updated
    • 7
    • 0
    • 0
    • 7 images
    • 0 comments
    • 0 image comments
  14. 1870 Scottish Fifie by GBModeler Updated

    This is a 1:48 scale model from the lines of an 1860 Fifie herring drifter found in "Sailing Drifters" by Edgar J. March, 1952, Percival Marshall & Company Ltd, London.  The hull was reduced proportionately from a 52-foot boat as shown in the book, to about 43 feet LOA.  Historical photos and contemporary photos of surviving boats were used to adjust lines and details in the model, which is built as a fictional boat circa 1870, working out of Leith, Scotland near Edinburgh.
     
    The model is primarily made from basswood; sails are paper.  A complete build-log can be found at  https://modelshipworld.com/topic/27283-fifie-by-gbmodeler-scale-148-typical-late-1800s-scottish-herring-drifter/?tab=comments#comment-784151
     
     
    Gbmodeler
    Album created by by
    Gbmodeler Updated
    • 20
    • 2
    • 0
  15. Tahitian Va'a Motu Updated

    Old-form Va'a Motu from Tahiti, based on diagrams in Haddon & Hornell's "Canoes of Oceania," Doran's "Wangka: Austronesian Canoe Origins" and Neyret's "Pirogues Ocenaniennes."  Western drawings of this canoe type go back to the 1770s.  By the 20th Century, this sail form had been replaced with spritsails of western form.
    Harvey Golden
    Album created by by
    Harvey Golden Updated
    • 4
    • 0
    • 2
    • 4 images
    • 0 comments
    • 2 image comments
  16. The 24-Gun Frigate Pandora 1779. 1/48 Updated

    johnny-modellbau.de Pandora
    js747a
    Album created by by
    js747a Updated
    • 14
    • 1
    • 0
  17. BonHomme Richard alias DUC DE DURAS 1/35 Updated

    The first Part of the BonHomme Richard
     
     
    js747a
    Album created by by
    js747a Updated
    • 7
    • 1
    • 0
    • 7 images
    • 1 comment
    • 0 image comments
  18. Dutch fluit ca. 1660 Updated

    Here some pictures of my latest paper/card model of a Dutch 17th century fluit. The design was based on a sketch in Nicolaes Witsen's book Aeloude en Hedendaegse Scheepsbouw en Bestier (1671) (Old and modern shipbuilding and managing). Measurements: length 120, beam 22 and depth in hold 11 1/2 Amsterdam feet (33.96 x 6.23 x 3.25 m). The scale is 1/77, giving a total length, including the rigging of 57 cm.
    Ab Hoving
    Album created by by
    Ab Hoving Updated
    • 14
    • 5
    • 5
  19. Baroque rook ship of the 9th-12th century, 1/24. Russia, Lake Ilmen. Updated

    Baroque rook ship of the 9th-12th century. Russia, Lake Ilmen. Reconstruction based on the results of archaeological excavations in Novgorod. Publication from the book "History of the North Russian shipbuilding". (2 volumes, 2001).
    Scale 1/24 (25 cm). Material: pine, linen, cambric.
     
    Dart
    Album created by by
    Dart Updated
    • 35
    • 3
    • 4
  20. Balandra Canaria Updated

    The Canarian “Balandra” appeared at the end of the 19th century in the fishing fleet of the islands inspired by boats from the European Atlantic, in response to the need for large and fast boats, capable of reaching the African coasts in a few hours. There were three types of sailboats in the Canarian fishing fleet of the time; the “balandra” (trawler), which often carried ketch rigging, the “balandro” (sloop), with a single mast and more refined lines, and finally the “pailebote”, a schooner rigged with two equal-length masts. The main species fished in the African fishing grounds was corvina, which was caught with gill nets, without inking, set deep on stone cliffs and at a depth of up to 50 m, although baskets for Moorish lobster were also set. The west coast of Africa between Cape Juby and Cape Blanco was the most abundant in corvina. The nets were set less than five miles from the coastline, and the abundance of fish was such that, in the middle of the Corvinera harvest, a hundred sailboats from Tenerife and Las Palmas would gather.
    Javier Baron
    Album created by by
    Javier Baron Updated
    • 12
    • 1
    • 3
    • 12 images
    • 1 comment
    • 3 image comments
  21. Merchant Schooner Updated

    My father began this model about 1940. Finished without plans.
     
    Pogy647
    Album created by by
    Pogy647 Updated
    • 9
    • 0
    • 0
    • 9 images
    • 0 comments
    • 0 image comments
  22. Bilbil Lalong from Astrolabe Bay, P.N.G. Updated

    Modeled at 1/2"=1', this is a 9.5m Lalong from Madang, Papua New Guinea. Sources for this model were Mary Mennis' two outstanding documentations of the reconstruction of the first Lalong built at Madang in over a generation: "The First Lalong Canoe Built for 40 Years, Bilbil Village, Madang Province" (1980), and "Mariners of Madang and Austronesian Canoes of Astrolabe Bay" (2011).  The upper lee platform is the 'captain's quarters,' while the weather side was the crew's.  The lower slatted platform was used for carrying cargo-- typically clay pots, which were traded along the coast. At the top of the mast is a wooden cuckoo-- totem of a local clan.
    Harvey Golden
    Album created by by
    Harvey Golden Updated
    • 6
    • 10
    • 0
    • 6 images
    • 10 comments
    • 0 image comments
  23. Unaligmiut Qayaq Updated

    Deerskin-covered kayak model.  This kayak type was used by the Yup'ik of Norton Sound, Alaska.  Model is 18" long; full size would be in the 16-17' range.
    Harvey Golden
    Album created by by
    Harvey Golden Updated
    • 4
    • 6
    • 6
    • 4 images
    • 6 comments
    • 6 image comments
  24. 1800s Galway Hooker by Gbmodeler Updated

    Galway Hooker by Gbmodeler - 1:48 scale - a small Irish fishing boat from the late 1800s
    Gbmodeler
    Album created by by
    Gbmodeler Updated
    • 21
    • 1
    • 7
  25. Caustic, British gunboat 1814 Updated

    Caustic was one of a fleet of 12 gunboats built by the British on Lake Champlain around the end of the War of 1812.   The work was overtaken by the Treaty of Ghent, ending the war in 1814, and the fleet was mothballed without ever having entered service.   Nevertheless, plans for two of the boats were retained, and survive in the Canadian National Archives.   These draughts were reproduced by Howard I Chappelle in his book “The History of the American Sailing Navy”, which is where I came across them.   The gunboats were 62’3” overall, with a beam of 16’2” and depth in hold of 4’1”.   They were rigged with lugsails but depended mainly on sweeps for propulsion.   Their main point of interest is that they were armed with three 24pdr long guns (or, in the case of the four section leaders, two 24pdrs and a 68pdr carronade), mounted on circular tracks.
    John Garnish
    Album created by by
    John Garnish Updated
    • 11
    • 2
    • 5
    • 11 images
    • 2 comments
    • 5 image comments
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