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Gallery of COMPLETED Scratch-built models


Completed Scratch Models

This Gallery section is for completed scratch models only. If you have any in-progress photos please post them in your logs or other appropriate forums. In progress photos will be deleted from albums as this gallery should not be used a duplicate build log. ONLY COMPLETED MODELS PLEASE. Thank you.

Albums

  1. Slippery Updated

    Slippery
    Hydroplane Raceboat, 1940, Scale: 1:24
    The Slippery is a 135 c.i. class hydroplane racer circa 1940. The length is 14 feet, 2 inches. The boat was designed by John L. Hacker. Plans for the Slippery were published in COMPLETE DESIGNS FOR 44 MODERN BOATS, Motorboating Ideal Series Volume 18. The model is scratch built, plank on bulkhead method using pear wood. Electro plating was done with Caswell Copy Chrome. The engine is a Gray Marine Phantom 4 racing engine. It is scratch built from boxwood, brass and styrene. The spark plugs were cast from resin.

    johnp76
    Album created by by
    johnp76 Updated
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  2. Le Gros Ventre by Henry Drinker Updated

    18th c. French Gabarre credited with the discovery of the west coast of Australia. Utilized as a supply ship for the French navy ( hence  the name ). POF scratch built. 1700 hrs.  
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     




    hdrinker
    Album created by by
    hdrinker Updated
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  3. Schifazzo Updated

    This Sicilian boat originally from the province of Trapania was mainly used for small local product transportation such as wine, salt, vegetables, fish, sulfur, and construction materials. During the XIX century and the beginning of the XX century it operated in Sicilian, Calabresas and Pugliesas coasts. Apart from cargo duties this boat was also used in fishing labors.
     
    The model reproduces a three mast schifazzo as was drawn by Fragata Capitan P.A. Hennique in his book “Les caboteurs et pêcheurs de la còte de Tunisie” published in 1888. This vessel is characterized by having a foremast located far at bow, which the sail maneuver upon a pulley situated in the outrigger, as is also singular that its lateen yard´s halyard drops towards the mast´s stern, thus complicating the change of the bulwark rail. The mainsail presented a cut of its bow end which transformed it into a bastard. The mainmast assembled in its upper end a pulley that hoisted a topsail volante to increase the surface of the rig with tail wind.
    Javier Baron
    Album created by by
    Javier Baron Updated
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  4. USS Guitarro Updated

    The bad luck submarine or known as "The Mare Island Mud Puppy." This 637 ClassSSN sank at the pier during building resulting in an additional 32 months of repairs. She went on to a very successful career. The model is Resin from a mold and master I made. The screw is brass and the control surfaces are cast Britannia.    



    torpedochief
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    torpedochief Updated
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  5. Skippercraft 17" runabout 1960 Updated




    DBorgens
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    DBorgens Updated
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  6. Hannah Updated

    Ships with some elements of character that appeal to me



     
     
     
     
     
     
    Boxnotes
    Album created by by
    Boxnotes Updated
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  7. Monitor Updated

    Styrene covered plywood and a tape tube made a pretty nice replica. Luckily the internet has a plethora of plans and photographs to use as reference. Interestingly the configuration of the ship changed enough over time to throw doubt into some drawings. 
    Boxnotes
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    Boxnotes Updated
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  8. NewYork Pilot Boat Updated

    This is a slightly kit bashed model of the Phantom kit. I added a charging dog figurehead and changed the name to the Ruff Waters as a gift for my vet.
    Boxnotes
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    Boxnotes Updated
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  9. HMS TRITON Cross section - scale 1/20 Updated


    G.L.
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    G.L. Updated
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  10. Rabelo Updated

    The rabelo is a Portuguese vessel typically from the Duero, that traditionally transported Oporto wine barrels from the Alto Douro where the vineyards where located up to Vila Nova de Gaia, Oporto, where the wine was stored and commercialized.
     
    As a river boat, the rabelo had a flat bottom without keel, with length between 19 and 23 meters and beam of 4.5 meters. Made by clinker, it fitted a square sail and had a crew of six or seven men. It used a large oar at stern-espadilla- for its governing that took place from an elevated platform both as much for making easier its handling as to having view towards its bow when it was filled with barrels. In occasions, when it was necessary, the boats where towed from tow rope paths by men or by groups of oxen.
     
    The implementation of the Duero railway in 1887 and further development of communication ways during the first half of the XX century lead to the decline of river navigation by the rabelos, to the extent that in 1961, initiating the hydro electrical benefit program of Duero, there were only six boats of them left in permanent activity. Nowadays, the rabelo has become a tourist attraction and in Oporto there is a whole fleet of them dedicated to give rides by the river to visitants.
    Javier Baron
    Album created by by
    Javier Baron Updated
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  11. Make BELLONA structural model kit. Updated

    We will try to make kit form so that anybody can make the structure model of BELLONA.
    It is going to be about this size.
    Size 600x150x150
    Scale 1/96


    kensaku
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    kensaku Updated
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  12. 1/400 USS Powhatan 1850, sidewheel steam frigate Updated

    Sidewheel steam frigates led by Commodore Matthew C. Perry of U. S. Navy are popularly known as “Kuro-Fune (Black ship)” in Japan. The influence of Perry Expedition to open Japan is so great, we Japanese living in modern world still use the term “Kuro-Fune” when we faced with economical impact from outside of Japan or even when foreign TV personality comes to Japan unexpectedly.
     
    Although sidewheel steam warships were destined to become obsolescent soon by screw propeller warships, the visual impact of gigantic paddle wheels may give much more impression than screw ships of which appearance showing little discrepancy from pure sailing ships except funnel.
     
    USS Powhatan was fourth and last large paddle steam warship for U. S. Navy, lunched in 1850, commissioned in 1852. Although she missed opportunity to join Perry’s first expedition, she became Perry’s flagship while she was participating his second expedition.
     
    Powhatan also has great connection with history of Japan. Shoin Yoshida’s failed attempt of stowing away to the United States, conclusion of Treaty of Amity and Commerce on her deck and embarkation of Japanese Embassy to the United States are examples of these historical events.
     
    I built miniature model of Powhatan for the part of diorama of “Perry’s second expedition and Yokohama”. The diorama is planned and built for 40 th exhibition of Yokohama Sailingship Modelers Club which will be held coming September. The scale is 1/400, based on plans acquired from Maryland Silver Company and some images of her model exhibited in US Navy Museum I found on the net.
     
    Hull is bread and butter built with 1.5mm plastic card. Coincidentally intervals of water lines appeared on sheer drawing reduced to 1/400 scale is almost 1.5mm! Although bottom hull is unnecessary for diorama, I also built bottom hull which can be separated by water line because I regard hull shape with flare naturally connecting to deadrising from keel as important. Planking was simulated with 1mm breadth masking tape, and copper plates were simulated with copper seal. Dummy butts were pressed onto seal, then cut into strips, and finally attached to bottom hull.
     
    Sidewheels and some other parts including tracks for chaser gun were laser cut plywood and card. Laser cutting data was prepared with Adobe Illustrator.
     
    Spars were made from brass rods of various sizes. Furled sails are thin lens cleaning paper and seams of sail cloths were printed on the paper.
     
    At this moment I don’t have spare time to write building log of her, but I gathered my tweets on her building. Although written in Japanese text, accompanied images will help your understanding.
     
    https://togetter.com/li/1252883
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
























    fake johnbull
    Album created by by
    fake johnbull Updated
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  13. Flying Fish clippers. Updated

    My model is scaled up to measure 1.5 meters in lenght. Al wooden materials in hull and deck are in oak. My building times has bean 1.5 years for this ship. Im starting this hobby then i was 12 years old and now i had 6 ships in my fleet. I wish al shipsmates good luck with this great hobby.
    Cinserly Leif Helge from Norway.
     

    LHS
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    LHS Updated
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  14. “Maria” a fishing vessel from Finkenwerder, Hamburg Updated

    The “Maria” was a fishing vessel from Finkenwerder, an island from the Elba in Hamburg, which had an active life during seventy years before finding its last pier in the hall of Naval Construction of the Deutsches Museum in Munich.
     
    The history of “Maria” starts in 1880, an era characterized for launching great fishing sailboats, and leads all the way up to the second postwar. The record of this unusual long time at sea and the recollection of episodes of life aboard the “Maria” give as a result a vivid presentation of deep sea fishing from Finkenwerder. Originally built according to the characteristics of a traditional wooden ship and rigged as a sailboat, the “Maria” adapted to the changing times and its reflection in the fishing world due to the industrialization.
     
    Finkenwerder offered few means of making a living. The majority of the population lived of fishing that was still practiced in the Elba since before 1815 although under strict rules for the protection of the fish populations. Its boats were of flat bottom, Pfahlewer with angled hulls assembled with one mast and a driftnet that extended for a longitude of about 10 meters that resulted difficult to handle for which the Fischewer fishing boats went onto adopt the first mechanical winches for technical support. Around 1850 the fisheries were experimenting a big boom due to the population growth. In train, fish could be taken in a cheap and fast way to the interior of the country. Also an increasing number of steam boats, which steam engines allowed them to have a bigger traction power could use very wide bottom trawling nets with trawl doors, which meant more productive captures. As a result of this fishing intensification, initial areas of fish populations decreased so much that the vessels had to move to new fishing areas, farther apart in their majority, a disadvantage for the ewer that sailed.
     
    This journey to other fishing grounds that existed at high sea represented for these vessels of fluvial origins a high price to pay: in a few years ten ewer with registration HF (Hamburg-Finkenwerder) got lost at sea.
     
    It’s in this transitional period when the ewer “Maria” is made, thus presenting a few modifications that were made during its construction to try to make a better adaptation to the new conditions of the environment in which was designed to operate. The first one was the assembly of a fixed keel along its flat bottom to improve the drift. It also anticipated lateral folding luffs even though it’s not sure that they finally got to be assembled, as so an iron keel luff, so that in its origin the boat had an openness in the bottom as well as the box to receive the luff in mid ship gangway. The navigation conditions of the ewer “Maria” were also affected by the existence of an on board hatchery communicated with the sea in which the captures were preserved live, and was accessible through a big hatch. This disposition was dangerous since if it wasn’t properly closed incoming water could penetrate on board. As a safety measure around 1905 the hatches were reduced and the hatchery was adapted. Later on in the 1957 restoration made for its incorporation to the funds of the Deutsche Museum had the width of the hatch reestablished to its original state.
     
    The change of navigational conditions and fishing techniques also required the adaptation of the rig, that at the time of the construction of the “Maria” evolved towards the classical equipment of a queche , after increasing the number of sails from just one initial sail of the fluvial Pfahlewer and the following three of the Giekewer until reaching the dotation of the 5 or 6 of the Besanewer that already fit two masts.
     
    The “Maria” ewer built in 1880, was 70 years in service and became one of the most durable vessels of its kind. In 1950 it was removed of its duty and abandoned went on to deteriorate buried in the mud until in 1957 it was acquired by the Deutsche Museum of Munich in which after a careful restoration can be contemplated nowadays.
     
    Javier Baron
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    Javier Baron Updated
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  15. Llaut Papallona Updated

    This Llaut is a coastal fishing boat typical of the Balearic Islands. Although formerly they were boats of Latin sail, the model shows a motorized specimen of those that at the moment can be seen in the ports of the islands.
    Javier Baron
    Album created by by
    Javier Baron Updated
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  16. English Cutter Cheerful 1804 Updated

    Chuck
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    Chuck Updated
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  17. Queen Anne Style Barge - 1705 Updated

    Chuck
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    Chuck Updated
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  18. Centerboard cutter Updated

    This model reproduces a cutter with centerboard. It was built in 1860-70 in Paynesville, in the Gippsland region in Victoria (Australia) for the Barton family that had properties in Point Wilson and in Ocean Grange.
     
    It was initially used amongst other boats for communication with Paynesville, and it was frequently seen navigating under any climatological condition, transporting sheep and goats from island to island. In a latter period it was used to proportion services to an increasing tourism business sector situated at Ocean Grange.
     
    In the decades of the 40s and 50s of the past century it underwent different modifications that made it lose its own characteristics, since its rig was changed by another of lesser display and the removable center board was substituted by a false keel. Later on it went onto pass from hand to hand to finish being abandoned for years at the bottom of Lake Mitchell, until the 80s when it was rescued for its recovery by a careful reconstruction process that restored its original state.
    Javier Baron
    Album created by by
    Javier Baron Updated
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  19. Badger 1777 Updated

    The Badger was the first command of Admiral Lord Nelson when he was a Lieutenant. It was probably American made by the looks of it's construction. He sailed in the West Indies chasing smugglers. 






    barkeater
    Album created by by
    barkeater Updated
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  20. Quechemarin Updated

    The quechemarines , whose name comes from the French chasse-marée , appear on the Cantabrian coast in the eighteenth century as the evolution of the freight boats, from which they gradually derived to a different type of boat, useful both for fishing and for the small cabotage. Of lines fuller than its predecessor, also presented a deeper sling that gave greater verticality to the fine stern, which improved the tight. These forms of the hull required a large sail area to navigate with light winds, so they rigged the main and staysail with their corresponding topsails, accompanied by a smaller mizzen and jibs to assist in the government of the ship. With harder times, the tall sails were lowered and some curl could be charged on the larger sails, even picking up the jib and the mizzen, so that the boat stayed in the typical rig of the chalupas .
     
    It was a type of ship very accepted by the owners of the Cantabrian coast due to its good sea conditions and much sought after for cabotage in the 19th century, which is why it was one of the most abundant types of vessels in those waters at that time. In Vizcaya, quechemarines dedicated to the transport of iron ore for steel mills in the area were specifically known as venacheros .
    Javier Baron
    Album created by by
    Javier Baron Updated
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  21. Mediteranean Chebec "Eagle of Algier" Updated

    This Chebec is based on an Amati plan which has been enlarged from scale  1:60 to new 1:48, the armed ship is built from scratch with many special details inside / outside with outcut viewing possibility from the port side. It is representing a vessel that was also used by corsairs and pirates of the mediteranean North African "Barbary Coast".
    The crew I have chosen and gathered together, is recruited from a bunch of multi cultural "ruffians". The build time was appr. 9 months.
     
    For larger images , please right click on the pic, and choose the larger magnification from the grey colored multi function bar  "other sizes", (choose the largest option there)   
    Enjoy 
     
    Nils
    Mirabell61
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    Mirabell61 Updated
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  22. "1928 Berthil Bothén-6 meters" Updated

    capcosta
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    capcosta Updated
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  23. Dirk Updated

    Caldercraft Victory 1:72. Took me over 3000 hours of work. Added crew to make it more lively. Difficulty to get an acrylic showcase made to measure. This is my 10th model and by far the most beautiful. Have also built since 1969 : HMS Fly, Friesland, Bounty, USS Constitution, Mayflower, Adler von Lübeck, Atropos, Spirit of Mississippi, Chaperon,
    dirk
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    dirk Updated
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  24. Chapman Barge 1768 (Scale 1:50) Updated

    Model of a Barge according to Chapmans "Architectura Navalis Mercatoria" plate XLVII no. 4
     
    The barge had the following specifikation:
    Length over steven: 12.9 m
    Width on frames: 1.9 m
    Draft: 0.6 m
    10 oars
     
    For the construction I followed David Antscherl's book "The Greenwich Hospital barge of 1832 and methods of building open boats".
    The proportions of the oars were taken from David Steel's "Naval Architecture" of 1805.
    In terms of appearance and colour, I have orientated myself to the Swedish royal barge "Wasaorden" whose replica is still used today for official occasions.
     
    Overall, the construction of the model took a year.
    The hull is clinker-built.
    The moulding was made of lime wood, which was treated with beeswax as a release agent.
    Building material of the model was pear for the planks (plank thickness 0.3 mm), box for the ornaments, bamboo for the oars.
    The cabinet was made of aircraft plywood for the walls and limewood for the roof.
    The colours are from Humbrol and Tamiya. The gold colour is an acrylic colour from Golden (Iridescent Gold Deep Fine)
    To determine the shape and posture of the putti on the foredeck, I made a plasticine model on an enlarged scale before carving the boxwood putti.
    Foxtrott
    Album created by by
    Foxtrott Updated
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  25. Round Yola of the Martinica Updated

    Until the 1950s, Martiniquens used a coastal canoe locally known as “gommier” for coastal navigation. Too limited and narrow, this vessel met less and less the requirements of fishermen, forced to go further and further into the sea due to the decrease in fishing resources. That's how the yola made its appearance.
     
     Towards 1960, under the auspices of local neighborhood festivities, yachting regattas began, which very soon became a key issue for the different coastal communities. Since then, these boats were designed and built specifically for the competition. Bigger and with greater sail development than the units destined to the fishing, these boats (very frequently sponsored) could embark until 18 men, most of them to lie down on the hangers (calls "bois-dressés") to maintain the boat well upright
     
    The model, which shows some of the "bois-dresses" in position reproduces one of these boats, called "Mont-Pelé" 'which was designed and built by Georges-Henri Langier.
     
    Characteristics of the model:
     
    Scale: 1: 105
    Length (hull): 99 mm.
    Breadth: 19 mm.











    Javier Baron
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    Javier Baron Updated
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