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Gallery of COMPLETED Scratch-built models


Completed Scratch Models

This Gallery section is for completed scratch models only. If you have any in-progress photos please post them in your logs or other appropriate forums. In progress photos will be deleted from albums as this gallery should not be used a duplicate build log. ONLY COMPLETED MODELS PLEASE. Thank you.

Albums

  1. Chapman Barge 1768 (Scale 1:50)

    Updated

    • 15 images
    • 3 comments
    • 1 image comment
    Model of a Barge according to Chapmans "Architectura Navalis Mercatoria" plate XLVII no. 4
     
    The barge had the following specifikation:
    Length over steven: 12.9 m
    Width on frames: 1.9 m
    Draft: 0.6 m
    10 oars
     
    For the construction I followed David Antscherl's book "The Greenwich Hospital barge of 1832 and methods of building open boats".
    The proportions of the oars were taken from David Steel's "Naval Architecture" of 1805.
    In terms of appearance and colour, I have orientated myself to the Swedish royal barge "Wasaorden" whose replica is still used today for official occasions.
     
    Overall, the construction of the model took a year.
    The hull is clinker-built.
    The moulding was made of lime wood, which was treated with beeswax as a release agent.
    Building material of the model was pear for the planks (plank thickness 0.3 mm), box for the ornaments, bamboo for the oars.
    The cabinet was made of aircraft plywood for the walls and limewood for the roof.
    The colours are from Humbrol and Tamiya. The gold colour is an acrylic colour from Golden (Iridescent Gold Deep Fine)
    To determine the shape and posture of the putti on the foredeck, I made a plasticine model on an enlarged scale before carving the boxwood putti.
    Foxtrott
    Album created by
    Foxtrott
  2. Round Yola of the Martinica

    Updated

    • 11 images
    • 0 comments
    • 4 image comments
    Until the 1950s, Martiniquens used a coastal canoe locally known as “gommier” for coastal navigation. Too limited and narrow, this vessel met less and less the requirements of fishermen, forced to go further and further into the sea due to the decrease in fishing resources. That's how the yola made its appearance.
     
     Towards 1960, under the auspices of local neighborhood festivities, yachting regattas began, which very soon became a key issue for the different coastal communities. Since then, these boats were designed and built specifically for the competition. Bigger and with greater sail development than the units destined to the fishing, these boats (very frequently sponsored) could embark until 18 men, most of them to lie down on the hangers (calls "bois-dressés") to maintain the boat well upright
     
    The model, which shows some of the "bois-dresses" in position reproduces one of these boats, called "Mont-Pelé" 'which was designed and built by Georges-Henri Langier.
     
    Characteristics of the model:
     
    Scale: 1: 105
    Length (hull): 99 mm.
    Breadth: 19 mm.











    Javier Baron
    Album created by
    Javier Baron
  3. Caïque de l’Etretat

    Updated

    • 13 images
    • 1 comment
    • 5 image comments
    Étretat is a town in the French department Seine Maritime, located on the coastline of the Pays de Caux, in Normandy. Étretat is well known for its high cliffs of white limestone that, together with the beach located next to them, attracted many artists such as Eugène Boudin, Gustave Courbet and Claude Monet.
     
    This beach with pebbles and quite steep, is the one that, in the absence of natural shelters, gave rise to the characteristics of the boat with which the local fishermen worked, which was known as “caïque”. The boats were stranded on the top of the pebble beach, pulling them with the help of robust winches, with the work of the local maritime community. This way of operating required that the boats had a structure at the same time very resistant and light, which was achieved with clinker construction,  with elm strakes that formed a hull of scarce draft and a keel in oak slightly curved to facilitate the pull operation.
     
    As a coastal fishing vessel, it practiced different fishing gears according to the season of the year and the type of capture. It had a great versatility in terms of its rigging. With good weather, he had a large canvas with a lot of cloth, which was almost oversized. When the wind cooled, the mainsail and the topsail retreated, and the main mast -whose length was more than one and a half times the length of the boat- collapsed. The ratchet sail ("borcet"), which had the peculiarity of being hoisted at the end of the boom when the entire sails were deployed, was then placed in a classic manner with the point of tack on the head of the stem, using for it the first strip of curls. A small jib could then be launched on the boom. In this way the “caïque” easily adapted to the changes of wind.
     
    This possibility of presenting different forms of rigging has given me the idea of making the model in duplicate, in order to present both forms.
     is a town in the French department Seine Maritime, located on the coastline of the Pays de Caux, in Normandy. Étretat is well known for its high cliffs of white limestone that, together with the beach located next to them, attracted many artists such as Eugène Boudin, Gustave Courbet and Claude Monet.
     
    This beach with pebbles and quite steep, is the one that, in the absence of natural shelters, gave rise to the characteristics of the boat with which the local fishermen worked, which was known as “caïque”. The boats were stranded on the top of the pebble beach, pulling them with the help of robust winches, with the work of the local maritime community. This way of operating required that the boats had a structure at the same time very resistant and light, which was achieved with clinker construction,  with elm strakes that formed a hull of scarce draft and a keel in oak slightly curved to facilitate the pull operation.
     
    As a coastal fishing vessel, it practiced different fishing gears according to the season of the year and the type of capture. It had a great versatility in terms of its rigging. With good weather, he had a large canvas with a lot of cloth, which was almost oversized. When the wind cooled, the mainsail and the topsail retreated, and the main mast -whose length was more than one and a half times the length of the boat- collapsed. The ratchet sail ("borcet"), which had the peculiarity of being hoisted at the end of the boom when the entire sails were deployed, was then placed in a classic manner with the point of tack on the head of the stem, using for it the first strip of curls. A small jib could then be launched on the boom. In this way the “caïque” easily adapted to the changes of wind.
     
    This possibility of presenting different forms of rigging has given me the idea of making the model in duplicate, in order to present both forms.
     
    Javier Baron
    Album created by
    Javier Baron
  4. Model ship from Mauritius - rebuild

    Updated

    • 2 images
    • 0 comments
    • 0 image comments
    Was given a ship to rebuild. All i know was built in Mauritius and in need of some TLC. The following two pictures show the boat before repair and after.


    GregF
    Album created by
    GregF
  5. Shadow (Mega Yacht)

    Updated

    • 31 images
    • 4 comments
    • 7 image comments
    Shadow is entirely scratch built model; loosely based on an actual mega yacht called Mary Jean II.  
     
    The model is is designed so that all five decks can be lifted off to reveal al fully detailed interior, from the luxurious Sun Deck, through to the two decked engine room.  Shadow’s two tenders are also included, as well as her two jet skis.
     
     
    Thanks
     





































    Omega1234
    Album created by
    Omega1234
  6. Urayasu Bekabune, Seaweed Harvesting Boat, 1/10 scale

    Updated

    • 5 images
    • 0 comments
    • 0 image comments
    Tokyo Bay was once famous for it's nori or edible seaweed, the same stuff that is dried and wrapped around sushi. Urayasu was one of the towns on the outskirts of Tokyo that was home to a fleet of seaweed harvesting boats called Bekabune.
     
    These small one-person boats were made in a very specific size, allowing them to navigate between the seaweed nets. 1 or 2 smaller boats were sometimes carried aboard a larger vessel, but many used a small spritsail to reach the seaweed beds.
     
    Mine is a 1/10-scale model of the larger 14' boat, which was also used for shellfishing. It's made from Japanese cedar, or sugi, like the actual boat, with beams and stem made from Japanese cypress, or hinoki. The model is based primarily on information in Douglas Brooks' book Japanese Wooden Boatbuilding. The boat was the subject of his second apprenticeship with Japanese master craftsmen.
    catopower
    Album created by
    catopower
  7. Sandbagger. Scale 1:112

    Updated

    • 11 images
    • 1 comment
    • 1 image comment
    Originally, the sandbagger was a working vessel specialized in bottom dredging fishing (oysters, scallops, etc.) on Staten Island, in the shallow waters of New York Bay. Of simple and robust construction, the sandbagger could carry a good load of oysters or other products. By habit, when the boats went out to fish, they did races informally and without respecting any rule, to show who was faster. And very soon the crews learned to move the load due to the wind to optimize the navigation conditions. To supply the lack of keel, and given the limitation they had to embark a large crew (ten men was the maximum because of the size of his hull), the sailors carried bags of sand of 25 kg. (that's where his name comes from) like a mobile ballast that changed sides when turning on board. The sandbagger thus became a very popular regatta sloop at the end of the 19th century. The races that were organized in the bay of New York saw compete the best sailors of the time, and were a field for betting. All kinds of tricks were consented to in these regattas, even becoming habitual to embark people as live ballast, which were thrown into the water at the opportune moment to be able to win in the competition. The hulls, with enough breadth, had very flat hull shapes, and with a hypertrophied sail they could reach very high speeds. To make that great sail possible, they had a very long boom, solidly attached to the hull with metal braces. The most famous of the sandbaggers, called Susie S., of 1863, with a hull of 8.30 m. of length, had a total length of 21.50 m. and had 140 m2 of sail. Unlike other models of the collection, I present the boat in this case in winter, without the sails, to be able to better appreciate its line.
    Javier Baron
    Album created by
    Javier Baron
  8. La Jacinthe

    Updated

    • 21 images
    • 0 comments
    • 3 image comments
    LA JACINTHE - Goêlette - 1823 scale 1:65

















    iosto
    Album created by
    iosto
  9. USS SANTA FE Bottle in a Ship

    Updated

    • 4 images
    • 1 comment
    • 0 image comments
    Minibar built for the former commanding officer of the USS SANTA FE SSN 764. Contains CROWN 3 shot glasses, a deck of playing cards, two  Cuban cigars, Cigar cutter, and a lighter. Now homeported at the office of Commanding Officer Submarine Group 2, Squadron 10
    torpedochief
    Album created by
    torpedochief
  10. Paranza de Trani

    Updated

    • 16 images
    • 0 comments
    • 2 image comments
    The paranza, a typical vessel from the lower Adriatic, was used mainly for fishing, although i also used f  an surveillance. Trani's paranza was of robust construction and often led to fishing campaigns lasting several months in Albania, Greece and even in the farthest waters of the eastern Mediterranean or North African coasts. The displacement ranged between five and thirty tons and the length ranged from ten to thirty-two meters. It was a  wide boat that as a peculiar feature showed a very rounded bow. A detailed description of Trani's paranza was provided by Captain Hennique, commander of a French frigate who encountered one of these vessels, the "Maria di Costantinopoli", off the coast of Tunisia in 1888, and made it the object of a meticulous and detailed study. The paranza had a rounded hull and had a relation between length and beam of 3: 1. The dimensions verified by Hennique were the following: 12 meters of length, 4.2 of beam and 1.3 of strut. The boat zipped 0'7 m and displaced 13 tons. His crew was 10 men and a boy. Hennique was particularly struck by the rudder of the boat because of its size, since with a length of 4.55 meters it pierce deeper than the boat and had a surface close to one third of the lateral drift plane. When the boat entered the port or was with scarce funds, the rudder was lifted, using for this one of the two cops that held the pole on each board. The boat was rigged with a Latin sail and, with favorable winds, it armed a jib on a pole moored at the foot of the pole and one of the bow bits.
    Javier Baron
    Album created by
    Javier Baron
  11. Saint Columba’s curragh

    Updated

    • 6 images
    • 2 comments
    • 1 image comment
      Registered Member #4036 Joined: Wed Aug 08 2012, 01:04am
    Posts: 31 This is a model of the 36’ curragh in which Saint Columba (a.k.a., Colmcille) travele from northern Ireland to the island of Iona in What is now Scotland, in 563 A.D. The model was built from scratch using traditional curragh building methods. A wooden frame was constructed that consisted of a double gunwale, and a basket-like frame of ribs (“hoops”) and stringers tied together with simulated leather sinew. A hand-sewn leather covering was then stretched around this frame and lashed to the double gunwale. Sails, rigging, and oars completed the model. A figure of Saint Columba was made from epoxy clay and positioned at the bow, in the act of releasing a ceremonial dove prior to the voyage. Another figure at the stern depicts a fellow monk, patiently waiting for Columba to finish his little ceremony. 





    Jnorton1946
    Album created by
    Jnorton1946
  12. H.M.S. Triton Cross Section

    Updated

    • 9 images
    • 0 comments
    • 0 image comments
    1:48  Scale Cross Section 
     
    Derek C
    Album created by
    Derek C
  13. HMCS VICTORIA

    Updated

    • 1 image
    • 0 comments
    • 0 image comments
    1/350 Scale Canadian SSK


    torpedochief
    Album created by
    torpedochief
  14. Caravela Redonda

    Updated

    • 5 images
    • 0 comments
    • 2 image comments
    seafarermiami
    Album created by
    seafarermiami
  15. Tserniki vessel of Mytilene Island

    Updated

    • 22 images
    • 3 comments
    • 8 image comments
    It's a scratch built model at 1:24 scale, of a small double ended vessel (Tserniki type) which used to be  built in Lesbos Island.
    It was used for coastal trading, often rigged with a sacoleva sail (sprit sail).
    Thanasis
    Album created by
    Thanasis
  16. 'Azov' Russian pr.775 Ropucha Class. 1/350

    Updated

    • 24 images
    • 2 comments
    • 3 image comments
    A model of Russian landing ship 'Azov' pr.775 Ropucha class.
    Designed as a Ro-Ro with capability for beach landings. They can carry up to 450t cargo.
     
    The hull is built with wood and styrene while the superestructure is made of styrene and lots of photoetched details from diferent brands, most of them remains from other projects taken from my spare box.
     
    While building I've wrote a Build log in a spanish-speaking forum, for those who may be interested you may have a look here:
    http://www.u-modelismo.com/foromodelismonaval/index.php?topic=1645.0  
    Oscar Ballesteros
    Album created by
    Oscar Ballesteros
  17. USS KENDALL C CAMPBELL DE-443

    Updated

    • 47 images
    • 1 comment
    • 6 image comments
    The John C Butler class destroyer escort was acquired by the U.S. Navy during World War II. The primary purpose of the destroyer escort was to escort and protect ships in convoy, in addition to other tasks as assigned, such as patrol or radar picket. Post-war she proudly returned home with four battle stars to her credit.
     
    Visit    http://geneberger-models.com/   to see more of my projects.
    gberger
    Album created by
    gberger
  18. SC-1075 Sub Chaser

    Updated

    • 8 images
    • 2 comments
    • 0 image comments
    1/32 scale built of glass, wood, resin castings and photo etching from my own processes. This model on display at the Mariners' Museum also. 
     
    View more of this and other models at  www.geneberger-models.com/

    For the complete build log visit   http://geneberger-models.com/sc-1075-sub-chaser/




     


     
     
    gberger
    Album created by
    gberger
  19. SS UNITED STATES

    Updated

    • 5 images
    • 4 comments
    • 6 image comments
    SS UNITED STATES built in 1/96 scale on exhibit at the Mariners' Museum. To see others by me visit    http://geneberger-models.com/

    For a complete build log see   http://geneberger-models.com/ss-united-states/
    For more 

    SS UNITED
     

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    gberger
    Album created by
    gberger
  20. Friendship Sloop Half-hull

    Updated

    • 1 image
    • 0 comments
    • 3 image comments
    A take on the Friendship Sloop.  Woods are Walnut, Mahogany, Cherry.  Mounting Board is Maple.
    Kirby
    Album created by
    Kirby
  21. De Zeven Provinciën 1665

    Updated

    • 6 images
    • 0 comments
    • 3 image comments
    The Flag ship of Michiel Adriaanszoon de Ruyter - Dutch commander of the fleet in the 17th century.
    This ship is completely scratch build from different available sources and then worked out up to a complete building kit which is now available via Kolderstok.com
    *Hans*
    Album created by
    *Hans*
  22. Ayubune, Hozu River Fishing Boat

    Updated

    • 9 images
    • 0 comments
    • 4 image comments
    This is a model of a 15-foot net fishing boat that was used on the Hozu river, northwest of Kyōto, Japan. The model is based on measurements recorded by boatbuilder Douglas Brooks, who built 3 of these boats over the past few years. Today, 24-foot fiberglass versions of the boat take tourists along the river's scenic rapids.
     
    This model is built at a scale of 1:10 using Japanese cedar, or sugi . It is my second completed scratch built Japanese traditional boat, or wasen .
    catopower
    Album created by
    catopower
  23. R.N.L.I. Ruby & Arthur Reed 2

    Updated

    • 10 images
    • 1 comment
    • 2 image comments
    Lifeboat 









    dj.bobo
    Album created by
    dj.bobo
  24. Chesapeake Bay Flattie - ca. 1890

    Updated

    • 8 images
    • 4 comments
    • 10 image comments
    This model is based on lines by Howard I. Chapelle in his book American Small Sailing Craft (pg. 311). Started July 2017 & completed Nov. 2017. The original boat was 27' 5-1/4" between perpendiculars. Model is built to a scale of 3/4"=1' and is about 21-1/2" long.
     
    Photos of the model under construction are available at http://www.modelboatyard.com/flattie.html
    jhearl
    Album created by
    jhearl

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