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Gallery of COMPLETED Scratch-built models


Completed Scratch Models

This Gallery section is for completed scratch models only. If you have any in-progress photos please post them in your logs or other appropriate forums. In progress photos will be deleted from albums as this gallery should not be used a duplicate build log. ONLY COMPLETED MODELS PLEASE. Thank you.

Albums

  1. HMS "Fly" 1763 -1:100, scratch, cardstock. Updated

    One of my cardstock models, this one designed for "Modelarstwo Okrętowe", made of cardstock and paper, all parts printed in colour, no painting. Masts and yards made of wood. The build of the model took about 4 months.












    0Seahorse
    Album created by by
    0Seahorse Updated
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  2. USS Olympia 1/200 cardstock Updated

    The build of this model took about 1 year. 
    It's Dewey's USS Olympia in her 1904 configuration with radio room, antennas and white-and-buff paint. 
    AmonFinn
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    AmonFinn Updated
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  3. Danish fishing vessel 1/220 from cardstock Updated

    In the 1900s with upcoming of the petrol engine, the Danish began to increase their fishing fleet in order to outrun fishermen who were underway by sail only. The fast Danish vessels suddenly appeared on the fishing grounds, took their advantage of speed and catched and delivered their fish before the others could react.
    That's why they've been nick-named "shark cutters".
    My model is nearly 95% scratch built, that's why I'm posting it here. Scale is 1/220. 



















    AmonFinn
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    AmonFinn Updated
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  4. Tserniki vessel of Mytilene Island Updated

    It's a scratch built model at 1:24 scale, of a small double ended vessel (Tserniki type) which used to be  built in Lesbos Island.
    It was used for coastal trading, often rigged with a sacoleva sail (sprit sail).
    Thanasis
    Album created by by
    Thanasis Updated
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  5. Boatshop Diorama Updated

    I worked on this diorama off and on between other models. First time I've made a diorama and it was a lot of fun! I love making little details. Scale is roughly 1:16 although most things were made by rack of eye as the old-time Chesapeake Bay boat builders would say.







     


     
     
     
     
     

     
    jhearl
    Album created by by
    jhearl Updated
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  6. Leut Updated

    A fishing boat for hunting sardines at the time when there was no petroleum fire was already burning in front of the bow




    2milimetra
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    2milimetra Updated
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  7. Hanse Kogge from Elblag Updated

    The Cog (Kogge) was the typical one masted trade ship of the era from XII to XV centruty C.E. used by the Hanseatic League sailing in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. The Elbing Cog - Koga Elblaska - was reconstructed based on archeological finds of other cogs, but mainly based on the seal of the town of Elblag.
     
    This model is based on the paper model from Maly Modelarz 9/2000 in the scale 1:100. It was my return to sail ship modelling after a decade long break. Instead of paper and card I used balsa wood to get some experience in bending planks and working with wood. Balsa is not the best material for making a model, but it is cheap and turned out pretty well. The model is not made historically accurate (for instance the rigging) but was made as a nice decoration piece.
     
    The model was finished in 2010.
    RdK
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    RdK Updated
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  8. Dutch 17th century workhorses Updated

    Here is a small collection of 17th century Dutch vessels. Some are for inshore use, some for coast traffic, some really crossed the seas. They all have in common that there is no showing off. They were just tools and that's how they were used. The yacht is the only exception in this row of models.
    Nevertheless they can be held responsible for most of the trading success the Dutch achieved in the 17th and 18th century.
     
    The models were made of paper and card after data I found in contemporary literature. Paper allows the model builder to build remarkably fast. These models were all made within two years (and there are more). They are all in the same scale: 1/77.

    This is a 'smalschip'. Inshorevessel, about 70 feet long

    A Galjoot (galliot) small trader

    A Hoeker, Fishing vessel for cod and haddock

    A 'buis' (buss) for catching herring

    A Kaag for transport of people.

    A 'waterschip', a fishing vessel for the 'Zuiderzee'.

    A 'wijdschip' (wide ship). Same type as the smalschip (narrow ship), but too wide to pass the Dordrecht locks, so it had to sail 'outside the dunes'.

    a small fluit, based on footage of a wreck in the Baltics at 120 meters deep.

    A whaling fluit, reconstructed after literature.

    a 'pinas', an armed trader.

    A yacht, used by officials.
    Ab Hoving
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    Ab Hoving Updated
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  9. Coble of Yorkshire Updated

    The coble is a boat that during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was characteristic of the English coasts of the northeast. It was used, both in rowing and sailing, for fishing, piloting and also, sometimes, as a pleasure boat and for bargaining. It was designed to be launched and picked up with the stern facing the shore even with great waves and strong breakers, and could sail long distances in the open sea. He wore very well, and in the hands of experienced crew was very capable of surviving a gale.
     
    Its clinker hull presents a very complex and curious shape, with flat bottom and high boards, with a curved slightly thrown stem and a keel that only reaches half the length of the boat, with two two side keels that come from said half. until the stern, which has the shape of a horseshoe and inclines at an angle of 45º. The flat bottom and the aforementioned side keels facilitate their beaching on shallow sandy beaches; an advantage in the coasts where it operated, in which the wide bays and inlets offered little shelter against the stormy weather. The design contains reminiscences of Nordic influence, although for the most part it shows a Dutch origin.
     
    The local  carpenters built the cobles without the use of planes, getting a robust and resistant boats. Although the cobles had the reputation of being dangerous to sail with an inexperienced crew, in experienced hands they could move safely and quickly.
    Javier Baron
    Album created by by
    Javier Baron Updated
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  10. Naval Cannon - 17th Century - 1:12 scale by Doc Blake Updated












    DocBlake
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    • 5 image comments
  11. Atalanta 1775 Updated

    This is a 1:48 scale model of a Swan Class sloop.  In 1779 she captured the privateer L'Epervier .  She was then captured by  Alliance off the coast of Nova Scotia in 1781 and retaken in Boston later that year.  Laid up in 1793, she was renamed  Helena  in 1797 and sold in 1802.
     
    The primary construction wood is boxwood.  The lower hull and deck planking is holly with accents of cherry.  The only purchased items are the cannon barrels, the pump gearing and lantern lights.







    tlevine
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    tlevine Updated
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    • 1 comment
    • 9 image comments
  12. Slippery Updated

    Slippery
    Hydroplane Raceboat, 1940, Scale: 1:24
    The Slippery is a 135 c.i. class hydroplane racer circa 1940. The length is 14 feet, 2 inches. The boat was designed by John L. Hacker. Plans for the Slippery were published in COMPLETE DESIGNS FOR 44 MODERN BOATS, Motorboating Ideal Series Volume 18. The model is scratch built, plank on bulkhead method using pear wood. Electro plating was done with Caswell Copy Chrome. The engine is a Gray Marine Phantom 4 racing engine. It is scratch built from boxwood, brass and styrene. The spark plugs were cast from resin.

    johnp76
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    johnp76 Updated
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  13. Le Gros Ventre by Henry Drinker Updated

    18th c. French Gabarre credited with the discovery of the west coast of Australia. Utilized as a supply ship for the French navy ( hence  the name ). POF scratch built. 1700 hrs.  
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     




    hdrinker
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    hdrinker Updated
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  14. Schifazzo Updated

    This Sicilian boat originally from the province of Trapania was mainly used for small local product transportation such as wine, salt, vegetables, fish, sulfur, and construction materials. During the XIX century and the beginning of the XX century it operated in Sicilian, Calabresas and Pugliesas coasts. Apart from cargo duties this boat was also used in fishing labors.
     
    The model reproduces a three mast schifazzo as was drawn by Fragata Capitan P.A. Hennique in his book “Les caboteurs et pêcheurs de la còte de Tunisie” published in 1888. This vessel is characterized by having a foremast located far at bow, which the sail maneuver upon a pulley situated in the outrigger, as is also singular that its lateen yard´s halyard drops towards the mast´s stern, thus complicating the change of the bulwark rail. The mainsail presented a cut of its bow end which transformed it into a bastard. The mainmast assembled in its upper end a pulley that hoisted a topsail volante to increase the surface of the rig with tail wind.
    Javier Baron
    Album created by by
    Javier Baron Updated
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  15. USS Guitarro Updated

    The bad luck submarine or known as "The Mare Island Mud Puppy." This 637 ClassSSN sank at the pier during building resulting in an additional 32 months of repairs. She went on to a very successful career. The model is Resin from a mold and master I made. The screw is brass and the control surfaces are cast Britannia.    



    torpedochief
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    torpedochief Updated
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  16. Skippercraft 17" runabout 1960 Updated




    DBorgens
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    DBorgens Updated
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  17. Hannah Updated

    Ships with some elements of character that appeal to me



     
     
     
     
     
     
    Boxnotes
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    Boxnotes Updated
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  18. Monitor Updated

    Styrene covered plywood and a tape tube made a pretty nice replica. Luckily the internet has a plethora of plans and photographs to use as reference. Interestingly the configuration of the ship changed enough over time to throw doubt into some drawings. 
    Boxnotes
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  19. NewYork Pilot Boat Updated

    This is a slightly kit bashed model of the Phantom kit. I added a charging dog figurehead and changed the name to the Ruff Waters as a gift for my vet.
    Boxnotes
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    Boxnotes Updated
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  20. HMS TRITON Cross section - scale 1/20 Updated


    G.L.
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    G.L. Updated
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  21. Rabelo Updated

    The rabelo is a Portuguese vessel typically from the Duero, that traditionally transported Oporto wine barrels from the Alto Douro where the vineyards where located up to Vila Nova de Gaia, Oporto, where the wine was stored and commercialized.
     
    As a river boat, the rabelo had a flat bottom without keel, with length between 19 and 23 meters and beam of 4.5 meters. Made by clinker, it fitted a square sail and had a crew of six or seven men. It used a large oar at stern-espadilla- for its governing that took place from an elevated platform both as much for making easier its handling as to having view towards its bow when it was filled with barrels. In occasions, when it was necessary, the boats where towed from tow rope paths by men or by groups of oxen.
     
    The implementation of the Duero railway in 1887 and further development of communication ways during the first half of the XX century lead to the decline of river navigation by the rabelos, to the extent that in 1961, initiating the hydro electrical benefit program of Duero, there were only six boats of them left in permanent activity. Nowadays, the rabelo has become a tourist attraction and in Oporto there is a whole fleet of them dedicated to give rides by the river to visitants.
    Javier Baron
    Album created by by
    Javier Baron Updated
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  22. Make BELLONA structural model kit. Updated

    We will try to make kit form so that anybody can make the structure model of BELLONA.
    It is going to be about this size.
    Size 600x150x150
    Scale 1/96


    kensaku
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    kensaku Updated
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  23. 1/400 USS Powhatan 1850, sidewheel steam frigate Updated

    Sidewheel steam frigates led by Commodore Matthew C. Perry of U. S. Navy are popularly known as “Kuro-Fune (Black ship)” in Japan. The influence of Perry Expedition to open Japan is so great, we Japanese living in modern world still use the term “Kuro-Fune” when we faced with economical impact from outside of Japan or even when foreign TV personality comes to Japan unexpectedly.
     
    Although sidewheel steam warships were destined to become obsolescent soon by screw propeller warships, the visual impact of gigantic paddle wheels may give much more impression than screw ships of which appearance showing little discrepancy from pure sailing ships except funnel.
     
    USS Powhatan was fourth and last large paddle steam warship for U. S. Navy, lunched in 1850, commissioned in 1852. Although she missed opportunity to join Perry’s first expedition, she became Perry’s flagship while she was participating his second expedition.
     
    Powhatan also has great connection with history of Japan. Shoin Yoshida’s failed attempt of stowing away to the United States, conclusion of Treaty of Amity and Commerce on her deck and embarkation of Japanese Embassy to the United States are examples of these historical events.
     
    I built miniature model of Powhatan for the part of diorama of “Perry’s second expedition and Yokohama”. The diorama is planned and built for 40 th exhibition of Yokohama Sailingship Modelers Club which will be held coming September. The scale is 1/400, based on plans acquired from Maryland Silver Company and some images of her model exhibited in US Navy Museum I found on the net.
     
    Hull is bread and butter built with 1.5mm plastic card. Coincidentally intervals of water lines appeared on sheer drawing reduced to 1/400 scale is almost 1.5mm! Although bottom hull is unnecessary for diorama, I also built bottom hull which can be separated by water line because I regard hull shape with flare naturally connecting to deadrising from keel as important. Planking was simulated with 1mm breadth masking tape, and copper plates were simulated with copper seal. Dummy butts were pressed onto seal, then cut into strips, and finally attached to bottom hull.
     
    Sidewheels and some other parts including tracks for chaser gun were laser cut plywood and card. Laser cutting data was prepared with Adobe Illustrator.
     
    Spars were made from brass rods of various sizes. Furled sails are thin lens cleaning paper and seams of sail cloths were printed on the paper.
     
    At this moment I don’t have spare time to write building log of her, but I gathered my tweets on her building. Although written in Japanese text, accompanied images will help your understanding.
     
    https://togetter.com/li/1252883
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
























    fake johnbull
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  24. Flying Fish clippers. Updated

    My model is scaled up to measure 1.5 meters in lenght. Al wooden materials in hull and deck are in oak. My building times has bean 1.5 years for this ship. Im starting this hobby then i was 12 years old and now i had 6 ships in my fleet. I wish al shipsmates good luck with this great hobby.
    Cinserly Leif Helge from Norway.
     

    LHS
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    LHS Updated
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  25. “Maria” a fishing vessel from Finkenwerder, Hamburg Updated

    The “Maria” was a fishing vessel from Finkenwerder, an island from the Elba in Hamburg, which had an active life during seventy years before finding its last pier in the hall of Naval Construction of the Deutsches Museum in Munich.
     
    The history of “Maria” starts in 1880, an era characterized for launching great fishing sailboats, and leads all the way up to the second postwar. The record of this unusual long time at sea and the recollection of episodes of life aboard the “Maria” give as a result a vivid presentation of deep sea fishing from Finkenwerder. Originally built according to the characteristics of a traditional wooden ship and rigged as a sailboat, the “Maria” adapted to the changing times and its reflection in the fishing world due to the industrialization.
     
    Finkenwerder offered few means of making a living. The majority of the population lived of fishing that was still practiced in the Elba since before 1815 although under strict rules for the protection of the fish populations. Its boats were of flat bottom, Pfahlewer with angled hulls assembled with one mast and a driftnet that extended for a longitude of about 10 meters that resulted difficult to handle for which the Fischewer fishing boats went onto adopt the first mechanical winches for technical support. Around 1850 the fisheries were experimenting a big boom due to the population growth. In train, fish could be taken in a cheap and fast way to the interior of the country. Also an increasing number of steam boats, which steam engines allowed them to have a bigger traction power could use very wide bottom trawling nets with trawl doors, which meant more productive captures. As a result of this fishing intensification, initial areas of fish populations decreased so much that the vessels had to move to new fishing areas, farther apart in their majority, a disadvantage for the ewer that sailed.
     
    This journey to other fishing grounds that existed at high sea represented for these vessels of fluvial origins a high price to pay: in a few years ten ewer with registration HF (Hamburg-Finkenwerder) got lost at sea.
     
    It’s in this transitional period when the ewer “Maria” is made, thus presenting a few modifications that were made during its construction to try to make a better adaptation to the new conditions of the environment in which was designed to operate. The first one was the assembly of a fixed keel along its flat bottom to improve the drift. It also anticipated lateral folding luffs even though it’s not sure that they finally got to be assembled, as so an iron keel luff, so that in its origin the boat had an openness in the bottom as well as the box to receive the luff in mid ship gangway. The navigation conditions of the ewer “Maria” were also affected by the existence of an on board hatchery communicated with the sea in which the captures were preserved live, and was accessible through a big hatch. This disposition was dangerous since if it wasn’t properly closed incoming water could penetrate on board. As a safety measure around 1905 the hatches were reduced and the hatchery was adapted. Later on in the 1957 restoration made for its incorporation to the funds of the Deutsche Museum had the width of the hatch reestablished to its original state.
     
    The change of navigational conditions and fishing techniques also required the adaptation of the rig, that at the time of the construction of the “Maria” evolved towards the classical equipment of a queche , after increasing the number of sails from just one initial sail of the fluvial Pfahlewer and the following three of the Giekewer until reaching the dotation of the 5 or 6 of the Besanewer that already fit two masts.
     
    The “Maria” ewer built in 1880, was 70 years in service and became one of the most durable vessels of its kind. In 1950 it was removed of its duty and abandoned went on to deteriorate buried in the mud until in 1957 it was acquired by the Deutsche Museum of Munich in which after a careful restoration can be contemplated nowadays.
     
    Javier Baron
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    Javier Baron Updated
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