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j21896

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    Boston, Massachusetts

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  1. Hi Alex, May I ask how many years it took, start to finish, for you to create this magnificent work of art? Thank you for posting your build log! Cheers, Robert
  2. 19 years that were well worth it, and then some Grant! She is absolutely beautiful. Congratulations! Robert
  3. Hi Augie, It's been quite a while between check-ins for me, but you've made so much progress -- and she looks great! I'm partial to Swiss pear decking, so I'm definitely looking forward to seeing your next updates! Cheers, Robert
  4. Beautiful Bob! That last broadside shot is just great! Robert
  5. I just went back a few pages in your log to look at the photos of the real ones, and I reckon you did it Grant! Robert
  6. Hi Grant, Would it help to sand a bit of a concave shallow in the top surface of the strip before making the other cuts? I'm glad you mention that the grain direction issue messed with your head a bit. In looking ahead a little, contemplating how I am going to make the cleats for my bulwarks, that was a puzzler for me. Robert
  7. j21896

    IMG 4072

    Beautiful job! I love the anchor and buoy presentation. Please do post more closeups! Cheers, Robert
  8. Hi John, For future reference, if you decide to go with copper for anything, here is a link to purchase liver of sulphur from Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Liver-Sulfur-Gel--4oz-SOL-610-04/dp/B0058ECZ56/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1375359424&sr=8-5&keywords=liver+of+sulfur+gel It works great highly diluted with water. Cheers, Robert
  9. Hi Jason, You are progressing through this rigging thing beautifully! I wonder, could you expound a bit for those of us who haven't yet gotten into serving lines? This is probably a stupid question, but why is "trimming a bit off" not an option? Thanks, Robert
  10. Thanks guys. Of course there is a bright side to all this. The first go round I didn't have any HobbyMill cherry wide enough for the brackets, so I used inferior wood. This time, I still don't have any HobbyMill stock large enough, BUT ... Many, many moons ago, about when I first started this project, I was in a Rockler store and bought a piece of cherry wood sized 3" x 3/8" x 24". I had no power tools at the time, so I really couldn't use it, but it was just such a beautiful piece of wood I grabbed it. Well, in my search for lumber to start my second attempt at the carriages, I came across that long forgotton gem! As Grant would say, I now have the chance to play with my toys (Byrnes thickness sander and table saw) some more -- and to use them much more extensively. This time, I didn't have to glue up strips, I could in fact slot the profiles in a larger block of wood, then slice the brackets from that. Also, I'm going to drill all the holes for the eyebolts BEFORE assembling the carriages this time. Robert
  11. Wow, great link Mike! He used draughtsman's linen for the sails -- wonder how that compares to the thickness of your material?? Robert
  12. Thanks John. Unfortunately I foolishly skipped an essential step in the process of making the gun carriages – a mistake for which I am now paying dearly with my time. Before going about mass production of any scratch built items, it would obviously be a good idea to build a prototype!! In building the gun carriages, I neglected to do that. Instead, I just followed the plans, failing to consider that -- being plans for “after-market” carriages -- they may need some adjustment to fit my build! I made all the components, built up all the carriages, got to the stage of adding the quoins and realized the height of the guns in the ports was going to be too high. At first I decided to continue on, and “live with it”, and I completed the carriages. Then, I realized that I was dragging my heels on installing the ironwork because I could not live with it. In any event, I drew up a few adjustments that I think are subtle enough to not throw off proportions relative to the gun barrels -- which are obviously not changing. I built a prototype, and now I’m fabricating all new parts. This is going to take a while longer. I feel pretty stupid, but I think I’ll just chalk this one up to a bad case of “go fever” (to use a 1960’s Apollo program reference). Robert
  13. Hi Augie, She's looking just gorgeous! Fabulous work, and so fast too! For planking the lower hull, you've probably already read it, but Chuck's tutorial on the subject is the gold standard in my opinion. (I sure wish I had it before I did my planking ) It's in the downloads section on the main MSW page here: http://modelshipworldforum.com/resources/Framing_and_Planking/Lining%20Off%20your%20hull%20for%20planking.pdf Robert
  14. Outstanding John! And I envy your ability to make such rapid progress. Robert

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