toms10

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About toms10

  • Birthday 09/18/1961

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Connecticut, USA
  • Interests
    Soccer, Marine reef aquariums

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  • Full NRG Member?
    MSW Member

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  1. Just wanted to say thank you to the New York Shipcraft Guild group. It was my first and definitely not my last time being at the conference. It was a pleasure meeting many of you from MSW. The quality of the models on display was quite amazing. Once again, nice job to everyone for making this an enjoyable event. Looking forward to next year. Tom
  2. Hi Charlie, Just wanted to confirm you have my registration. Your PM does not seem to be working.
  3. I will be going and will be bringing my Constellation once I figure out how to get it there. My wife also plans to go to see the models and then the area...
  4. I am on board! Great explanations to help better understand what goes on behind the scenes. As for the complainers, some just aren't happy unless they complain. Thank you to all the moderators and others who keep this wonderful sight afloat. Tom
  5. Steve, Thanks for the pictures. They were quite enjoyable and really showed a lot of detail of how she was built. Tom
  6. As this was my first attendance to a conference, originally I was just coming as a spectator. After thinking about it some more I said why not just reserve a spot and bring my Constellation and enjoy all the aspect of the show. I just have to figure out how to get it there. Luckily it is only just over an hour away. Check is in the mail! Tom
  7. I just saw this. I will definitely be in attendance to browse the models and meet some of the people on MSW. Tom
  8. I also have been maintaining a reef for the past 25+ years. The two hobbies are very similar. If there is one thing to be learned there is that slow and steady produces a "wow factor" and keeps it for a long time. Something that's quick and easy may produce a "wow" but it will probably only be for a fleeting moment in comparison. I would love to be able to crank out models but if they are just slapped together what is the point? Slow... enjoy the journey, that is what any hobby is all about. On the lighter side, it also makes a great excuse on why something is taking so long. Tom
  9. Bear, I don't think Pickles is "feelin the spirit" by his/her expression. Probably hoping this pic doesn't go viral. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all at MSW. By the way, I have only completed one build and I did use CA on some of the rigging. I did fall victim to lines breaking, especially the strops around the blocks if they were twisted or bent in a direction other that how it dried. I will try some watered down white glue or fabric stiffener to secure knots if need be on my current build. Tom
  10. Seems simple enough to try. Anything that makes tying ratlines easier is worth a try. Thanks for posting. Tom
  11. Eventually I will need to carve for my current build. I will definitely be following this as I have yet to carve anything but a Thanksgiving Day turkey. Thanks for putting this together Chuck. Tom
  12. Yes that pretty much nails it for me too. I build for three people... me, myself and I. I like to think the model I am building is a somewhat respectable facsimile of the original and more a piece of furniture than a museum piece. How it gets to its final stage is not of much consequence. Until the day comes that someone commissions me to build something those are the rules I am playing by. the way I see it I will most likely be playing by these rules forever. Tom
  13. To keep the bottom corners of the sails in the right position I tensioned the clew lines to curve the bottom corners of the sail to the correct position. Then I tied up the sheet lines with enough tension to keep the clew line taught. The sail still maintained a realistic curve at the bottom. To get the whole sail to have a billowing effect, I read that some put a wire inside the side hem of the sail and then bend it accordingly. Tom