Andrew J.

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About Andrew J.

  • Birthday May 27

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Central New York

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  1. I'm not going to risk starting another build log just yet, but here are a few pictures of what I have so far.
  2. I can't believe it's been so long since I posted or commented anything on here. I must admit the Dumas kit just wasn't cutting it for me as far as accuracy goes, so it fell by the wayside some time ago. However, I started a new scratchbuilt 1:12 back in September and got the hull just about finished, although I haven't worked on it in a few months, either. Seeing your finished model is a great inspiration, though, sailboat392!! It's absolutely gorgeous I'm hoping some time soon I will regain my drive to finish mine. I have to ask, is there any chance you made templates of your seats? They look absolutely spot on, so if you have any sort of pattern for them that you would be willing to share, that would really be fantastic!
  3. Any more progress on this? I remember you said you wished to have it completed by the end of this year. I've been reluctant to start a new build log after my previous two fell by the wayside, but I have been making good progress with a new 1:12 scratch built lightning. I really hope you haven't given up on yours like I did with my previous ones!
  4. Hi, Dave. It seems that maybe you haven't seen my first build log for the Dumas kit. Here I have posted many pictures of Lightning #1, which is on display at the Skaneateles Historical Society. http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/11596-lightning-sailboat-by-andrew-j-dumas-scale-112/page-4 My own profile picture is actually one of my pictures of Lightning #1.
  5. Thank you for starting a log! I can't wait to see pics of your beginning stages!
  6. I scored some free mahogany from a friend from church! It's all scrap that he got free from Stickley Furniture a few years ago, but it's really nice stuff. I might end up building the whole boat out of it, but we'll see what happens. Hopefully I'll be able to make some progress in the next couple weeks.
  7. Wow, Dave, that is absolutely stunning! Please tell me you have more pictures of it in progress. If you don't want to post a build log quite yet, feel free to post a couple more pictures here so people have something to look at until I start mine. What kind of wood are you using, and are you modeling it after a specific hull number?
  8. Thanks for your support, Patrick! As far as I can tell, I'm the only one who's ever had a build log of a Lightning on this forum, so you're probably not mistaken
  9. Hello, all. This is only my second build log, so I should probably still introduce myself. I currently work at the Skaneateles Country Club in Skaneateles, New York: the place from which the very first Lightning was launched in 1938. This will be a model of that boat, which currently resides in the Skaneateles Historical Society Museum. Whether or not I will still be working at the club by the time this project is finished, I don't know, but it will be a gift to the club regardless. The 80th Anniversary Lightning Regatta is coming up in 2018, so I hope to have it finished by then. I was somewhat hesitant to start this log so early in the project, but I figured I might as well, in order to get tips and hints from some of the more experienced members. I also feel a little bit guilty for starting this project when my other Lightning isn't even half done, but I am hoping that I will be able to work on them both together once this boat is at the same stage as the other. I really hope I'm not going in way over my head with this scratch build, as it will only be my third model boat, but I don't think I could have possibly picked a better subject. Even the 1:1 comes with a complete instruction manual, written for amateur builders! The first step was to draw my full size plans using the table of offsets and the lofting technique. This was fairly straightforward, but rather time consuming, because I chose to convert everything to millimeters before dividing by 8, so I wouldn't have to deal with fractions. It seemed to work out pretty well. Unfortunately, I had to loft the half breadth measurements twice because I realized that my 18" steel ruler isn't actually straight. My 4' level solved the problem. For those that aren't familiar with this process, I shall try to explain. I drew the centerline and marked stations 0-10, including the half stations. Then using a square I drew lines perpendicular to the center line to delineate the stations. I used a pair of calipers to transfer the scaled down measurements from the ruler to the paper for greater accuracy. I then stuck a small nail into each point on the full stations and used my 18" ruler as a batten to draw the resulting curve. Using the calipers again, I obtained the measurements for the half stations from the points where they intersected the curve. I completed this process five times to draw the half breadths at the sheer and chine and heights from baseline for the sheer, chine, and bottom. The rudder was a little trickier to draw because I had to draw the curves freehand, but all the necessary measurements were provided, so it wasn't a big deal. I had to stew for a while over the centerboard before I was able to draw it because there are no angles given in the plans. Eventually I just decided to guesstimate that the angle at the bottom left was about 91o and was able to go on from there using the provided measurements. To get the top right corner, you can tell that I used a compass to find the intersection of the two arcs created using the lengths of the top and right sides as radii. The arcs for the rounded corners were given in the plans, so I used the compass to draw them in. That's all I have for now. I'll be drawing the actual frames later, but after that, there's pretty much nothing more to be done until I buy some lumber. I don't know when that will be because I don't have a whole lot of extra money floating around right now, but I'm in no hurry. Since this will be a model of Lightning #1, I want to build it with woods that were used in the original construction, namely cedar (frames and planking), mahogany (centerboard trunk, transom, and trim), and spruce (spars). The centerboard will be made of steel, which I am hoping won't be too much harder to work with than the aluminum I used for my other one. Any advice on this matter would be most welcome. All other fittings will be made of brass or bronze. Again, any tips, advice, or general encouragement will be greatly appreciated. I don't want to have to upload them all again, so pictures of Lightning #1 can found in my build log for the Dumas kit here: http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/11596-lightning-sailboat-by-andrew-j-dumas-scale-112/page-4
  10. Those are sharp! I thought you meant that you were looking for belaying pins online. I know a couple people have suggested you start your own build log. I for one would greatly enjoy it if you did. Not that I have any problem with anybody posting their own pictures in my log, but I would really like to see more of yours. Do you have any from earlier in your build?
  11. I just uploaded a profile picture. It's one of my favorite pictures that I've taken of sunrise over the SCC marina.
  12. Yeah, blocks are tricky. I'm still looking around for those myself. I had ordered some single blocks from Cornwall Model Boats, but only found out when I received the rest of my order that they were out of stock. I had to google what a halyard lead block looks like, and from the looks of it, I haven't seen anything like them in any kind of scale either. I would have no problem with belaying pins, though. All you need are toothpicks or kebab skewers and a sharp knife.
  13. It seems you already know your way around model ships, but it sounds to me like you're going about searching for parts the wrong way. Even though this is all new to me, I've found that you can get just about any fitting you're looking for; you just can't expect everything to be labled in the scale you need them in. That's why I took all the measurements that I could myself. Then I could just divide everything by 12 and find the closest size model fitting. I apologize for the lecture if you already knew all that, but that's how I went about finding stuff. I just wasn't able to get all the parts I need from one source.
  14. This looks like it's going to be a beautiful boat. I look forward to seeing your progress. Anyway, as a fairly new member myself, I would like to give you some friendly advice; that being to take a look at the rules of naming a build log, before an older member yells at you for doing it incorrectly
  15. Haha, no, I just work here. I've never even been in a Lightning before. I just took that picture in the upstairs hallway.