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Dee_Dee

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    Illinois South of the 'Cheddar Curtain'

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  1. Musicians and Modelers

    My first exposure to classical music was in the first grade by Dr. Herbert Zipper. Dr. Zipper brought music to the grade schools in Evanston, Illinois in the 1950's and 60's and I loved his annual concerts. Dr. Zipper is the subject of the documentary 'Dachau Song', the story of Vienna born musician and conductor who survived Dachau, Buchenwald, and a Japanese concentration camp to become one of the great music educators of the world, continuing at 92 to bring music to the inner city schools of America. I really wanted to play the bassoon, but the bassoon was a bit big for me, so I started playing the clarinet in third grade. I continued playing in the high school band and orchestra and also learned how to play flute, oboe, saxophone and classical guitar. At university, I was an Applied Music Major, where I also learned (sort of) the French horn, trumpet and percussion (I have a lot of respect for the percussion section, especially the triangle player). In my third year, I was in three orchestras, two symphonic bands and numerous small ensembles. In addition to a full class load and a part time job, my weekly schedule included: Orchestra rehearsals 9 hours (plus 2-5 hours to commute to downtown Chicago (Sunday train schedule.)) Symphonic band rehearsals 6 hours Ensembles rehearsals 3 hours Practice Rooms 10++ hours The Concert Meister in one of the orchestras owned a real Stradivarius Violin and he let me hold it!! Be still my heart as my toes curled! And then something happened - I lost my ability to sight read, memorize music, my performance did a 180 and went downhill - fast. I saw doctors, but none could find anything wrong. So that was the end of that dream, I changed majors to Business and I never played again. It took over 15 years to sort of figure out 'what happened'. My brain was 'misfiring' - actually, the receptors in the lower left lobe were not receiving. No regrets, I had fun and I'm still in love with classical music. My Axes: Buffet clarinets. The shorter clarinet is in Bb and the taller one is in A. Orchestra music for the Bb clarinet could have up to five flat / sharp notes, the clarinet in A reduced that to one or two flat / sharp notes - phew!!! Before I got my clarinet in A, I had to transpose the music as I was playing the music. Now THAT was a fun trick to learn - especially when we were sight reading a new opus! The flute is a Gemeinhart, a really nice student flute. After touring Europe for a month, lugging around a bulky double clarinet case that weighed close to 20 pounds, I swore, in my next life, I'm coming back as a flute / piccolo / kazoo player, their double case weighed less than 5 pounds. But I really couldn't complain, one of the cello players was a cellist in the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, she purchased a plane ticket for her cello. I would use the schools or borrow the oboes and saxophones. My guitar is a Martin D-18S, I can't remember if it's a 1968 or 1969. It's a 12-fret (neck connects at the 12th fret) and the neck is wider. It's outrageously loud for an acoustic guitar. It's been sitting in it's case in the closet, the pick guard has started peeling off and the neck needs to be reset and needs new tuning pegs. I'm going to (near) Allentown, PA this summer, so I'll make an appointment with Martin Guitars to have the repairs done. And finally, there's the corny music majors joke -------- I also played the radio.
  2. Kurt, I have two of these straight fairleads. They measure 12mm, made of white metal with an aged bronze plating or painting. I believe they came with the Blue Jacket 1:30 Endeavour J boat, but they were packed with two pair of oar locks that were 6mm long. If it will help, I can send these to you to make a mold / copies Also, check out this page at BlueJacket: http://www.bluejacketinc.com/fittings/fittings17.htm Dee Dee
  3. Newbie

    I posted this in reply to your thread on Naval history: I built the Corel sloup kit using photos from all of the above links; I bashed the heck out of it from the very beginning. When building this kit, it became apparent that EVERY Brittany sloop is different; a lot of it depended on what is the primary fishing, oysters, lobsters, sardines, location and more. The link to my build is in my signature. A place to start is with the 'Bergère de Domrémy, hull # B 5929', a scallop dredging sloop / coquillier built in 1936. It was rebuilt and now a French National Treasure. The French An Test website contains some details and history. There's lots of info on this website. http://bergere.antest.net/le-bateau/description/ Info on Auguste Tertu, who built the Bergère de Domrémy and many other boats http://bergere.antest.net/2013/12/auguste-tertu/ Page through Sophie's link for numerous photos and good info on the Bergère de Domrémy and other sloops: http://sophie-g.net/photo/bret/brest/bergere01.htm A blog with lots of photos of Bergère de Domrémy http://www.laroyale-modelisme.net/t9662-la-bergere-de-domremy The Brittany sloop is similar to the Irish Galway and Kinsale Hooker and many other Channel / Atlantic fishing boats. More info on these Irish boats here: http://www.tradboats.ie/index.php The "Douarnenez Festival" held every other year features numerous variations on the Brittany sloop / coquillier. Here are links to photos from the 2006 and 2012 festivals. Google 'Douarnenez Festival' for more photos. 2006: http://www.pbase.com/image/65376766 2012: https://www.flickr.com/photos/valendrevarzecois/7623197092/ Videos from 2012 Douarnenez Festival https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bwdXWwGRbY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcetV8QmPGk This Pinterest page did a good job of assembling various fishing vessels from the Channel and Atlantic coast and includes some basic drawings. https://www.pinterest.co.uk/tomedom/french-traditional-boat-types-of-the-channel-and-a/
  4. Brittany Sloops

    A place to start is with the 'Bergère de Domrémy, hull # B 5929', a scallop dredging sloop / coquillier built in 1936. It was rebuilt and now a French National Treasure. The French An Test website contains some details and history. There's lots of info on this website. http://bergere.antest.net/le-bateau/description/ Info on Auguste Tertu, who built the Bergère de Domrémy and many other boats http://bergere.antest.net/2013/12/auguste-tertu/ Page through Sophie's link for numerous photos and good info on the Bergère de Domrémy and other sloops: http://sophie-g.net/photo/bret/brest/bergere01.htm A blog with lots of photos of Bergère de Domrémy http://www.laroyale-modelisme.net/t9662-la-bergere-de-domremy The Brittany sloop is similar to the Irish Galway and Kinsale Hooker and many other Channel / Atlantic fishing boats. More info on these Irish boats here: http://www.tradboats.ie/index.php The "Douarnenez Festival" held every other year features numerous variations on the Brittany sloop / coquillier. Here are links to photos from the 2006 and 2012 festivals. Google 'Douarnenez Festival' for more photos. 2006: http://www.pbase.com/image/65376766 2012: https://www.flickr.com/photos/valendrevarzecois/7623197092/ Videos from 2012 Douarnenez Festival https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bwdXWwGRbY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcetV8QmPGk This Pinterest page did a good job of assembling various fishing vessels from the Channel and Atlantic coast and includes some basic drawings. https://www.pinterest.co.uk/tomedom/french-traditional-boat-types-of-the-channel-and-a/ I built the Corel sloup kit using photos from all of the above links; I bashed the heck out of it from the very beginning. When building this kit, it became apparent that EVERY Brittany sloop is different; a lot of it depended on what is the primary fishing, oysters, lobsters, sardines, location and more.
  5. Tiny Hem in Sails

    For quality sail fabric, check out a quilt shop, specifically a quilt shop that sells Bernina sewing machines. The fabric I like for sails is "Art Gallery - Pure Elements." It's a high quality 100% pima cotton, a good weight and it has a really nice hand. The fabric comes in 66 different colors, I like the color called 'White Linen'. A yard of this fabric costs about $12.00. Quilt shops are a great resource! While you're at the quilt shop, ask them about sewing lessons! To straighten the wire, use a length of wire twice as long as needed. Grab each end of wire with flat nose pliers and stretch. For added stretch, place your wrists on the outside of your knees and use your legs to stretch the wire. Leave the wire long until after sewing. Sewing a finished 1/8" hem IS really easy: -Cut the sails 3/4" wider than sail pattern -Fold the hem on the sail pattern to make a 3/4" hem. Lightly press the fold flat. -Cut the sail corners 90* to the bisected angle. This will get rid of the bulk at the corners -Insert wire or rope in fold of fabric -I tried numerous machine feet and the one that worked the best was an 'Open Toe Embroidery Foot.' See photo below -Sew sail hem line along edge, as close to wire / rope as possible using a stitch length of <2mm. See photo below -After sewing hem line, trim excess hem fabric with appliqué scissors, approximately 1/16" away from sewing. Be sure to leave enough hem to add sail hardware -The actual hem in the photo below is 7/64" wide -Secure raw fabric edge and corners with glue The ONLY glue I recommend using is "Beacon Fabri-Tac". All of the Aleene's glues will eventually fail, dry out, loose their strength. Beacon Fabri-Tac is the glue designers use to glue crystals on to wedding dresses and other garments. -Apply glue sparingly between the layers of fabric with a toothpick. -Glue may need to be thinned with a drop or two of acetone. -To completely close the hem, keep running the toothpick along the hem until the glue starts to set. -This glue does not spread through capillary action, which is good. -The fabric with glue will be a bit firmer, but will still move. I made this sample in just a few minutes. Before the glue fully set, I ran my thumb nail across the seam which caused some of the unset glue to squeeze through the fabric and made the fabric a bit shiny.
  6. An acquaintance in Eugene, OR posted on FB this afternoon that the air is bad and she needs to get her two kids somewhere with better air. She included a link to an interesting website that monitors air quality: https://airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=airnow.local_city&mapcenter=0&cityid=715

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