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mikiek

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About mikiek

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  1. Ya think she's big now? One thing to think about - as you put masts and especially bow spars in place it gets incredibly hard to turn the boat around on your bench without breaking something. Drill holes for each section of each mast (main, top, top gallant, t.g.royal) for each mast and bow spars. A 1"x6"x18" board with holes drilled in it is great for working with the individual spars and also good for storage when you want that stuff out of the way. If it hasn't been said already rig these spars individually before assembling a mast. I found that I could hang about 80% of the rigging before assembly & installation. The big trick is guesstimating how long some of the ropes should be. Measure, measure again and then add about 15-20%. Warning - you will end up with a huge bowl of spaghetti. This can be mitigated somewhat by taking logical groups of ropes (for instance the t.g.royal port side shrouds) coiling them and then wrap with a piece of masking tape. They still dangle around but they shouldn't get tangled that way.
  2. Hey Tom - with the basswood a lot of people use Golden Oak. With basswood I think it looks real nice. If you want it a little darker then apply 2-3 coats. Keep in mind that stains look and behave differently on different woods. My deck is boxwood and Golden Oak looked dreadful on that. If you want it uniform then use a conditioner/sealer first. Personally I like the blotchiness. I think it adds a weathered look so most times I dont use the sealer. The biggest source of blotches is glue so sand, sand, sand before you stain. As basswood has a tendancy to "shed" hit it last with some very fine sandpaper or steel wool to help remove flakes.
  3. Take care of yourself Simon - the boat isn't going anywhere.
  4. Tom - just my opinion but that early american looks pretty dark for a deck
  5. they call that zip seizing
  6. What a great way to dress that up Frankie. Are you finding the leaf stays put or does it come off easily?
  7. Dang - almost 2 weeks since I posted. I haven't been goofing off - not too much. Came across this game Naval Action a while back. I find it almost mesmerizing and fun to play. A lot of time spent there lately. Work is continuing since the completion of the hull. There are a few deck items and hull trim going in and the next step is the masts. I'm starting the channels and preparing do drill out the holes for the masts. That's always a troubling exercise for me. That and the hawsers. The plans show the main mast at no angle, flush with a frame piece. The foremast is angled although there is nothing stating how much. The manual - " drill mast holes per plan". Well thank you. This kit has had it's ups and downs. I've been shorted several more sizes of sticks but then there will be some good technique for doing something. I'll try to do a short eval when it's all over. Here's a few shots: I did an initial wipe down of the hull with linseed oil but all the pieces added afterwards are still unfinished. Trim at the bow (head). Camera sure makes it look rough. In the plans those rails are set almost 1/2" higher. Way too high. Took them down some. In need of a cleanup for sure! Thanks for reading......
  8. It looks as good as the air brush would have done. Glad you're going with painting it instead of blackening. I think in the long run it's easier. Especially if you have to touch it up after the pieces are in place.
  9. Yupper - pretty big indeed. BUt she's as clean as the day I put her in there. Tom that paint jar concerns me. If you end up needing the paint 6-8 months from now for a last coat or touch or something it could very well be dried up. Seal that lid or look for a better storage jar. The cardboard gaskets don't last long in my experience. These work a lot better.
  10. Shape planks one for each side. How many times have I heard that? The last 4 strakes are real bears. I finished one side but did not make duplicates for the other side. So those will be custom shaped as well He's great at handing out advice, but not so great at following it. Should be done planking soon.
  11. I found it interesting. I would have assumed the grain in a dowel would run from end to end, thus giving you fairly straight stick. However if you look closely - maybe with a magnifier - you can see the grain (if there is any) goes all over. Even a stick that appears straight today will likely warp down the road. Go with what you got for this build but you might consider trying to make spars from square sticks sometime. I found it a good challenge, but at the same time some things - like cutting the octagons - can be easier.
  12. I've got the one from Model Expo. Always struggled with it. It just beat the crap out of the blocks - even in a few short seconds. Adding sawdust seemed like putting some padding in the can.
  13. JCF - did I understand you correctly? You added extra sawdust in the tumbler can? Sounds like a good idea. So the paddle isn't as brutal on the blocks?
  14. All those cross tree parts are better drilled before gluing. As a matter of fact, attaching blocks, eyebolts, etc. should all be done before gluing the top to the crosstrees. I really blew it with the sprit on the first try. The normal taper that we put on most spars (fatter at one end thinner on the other) doesn't apply completely on the sprit. The top side is flat. Like you, I got something upside down. I figured I'd be a smart guy and just rotate the sprit. Oops. Did you make your spars from square sticks or did you use those from the kit?

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