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Overworked724

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About Overworked724

  • Birthday 08/26/1966

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Libertyville, Illinois, USA
  • Interests
    Chasing my wife around the house (sometimes I catch her), Biking, Running, Model building (recently), Movies, Reading (Sci Fi and Ficition)

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  1. In a pique of incredible courage...screaming “Damn the TORPEDOES!” (And scaring the Admiral in the process)...I decided to mount the bowsprit. Turned out pretty decent! I am deciding to deviate from the plans and not include the wooden boarder (toe stubber) where the bowsprit intersects the deck. I like the seamless way it looks as it merges with the deck planking. See you all all next weekend...busy workload the next week. Moving on...
  2. Celebrated too soon. I was practicing my repeated half hitches (used in the bowsprit gammoning...was practicing on a toothpick to simulate my rigging bundle which forms between the sprit and the stem)...when I realized.... ...that I put my bloody JIB-Boom on sideways!!! Yep...I looked down as I was dry fitting the bowsprit and realized I’d botched the job...the shreaves at the tip of the boom were pointing sideways. But wood is forgiving...wood glue even more so. Luckily I used CA glue very modestly in setting up the wrapping around the boom and bowsprit. Was able to completely unwrap, unglue, reglue, and rewrap the boom with the right orientation. This time I ended up with both the leading and trailing end terminating on one side. sigh...Moving on...
  3. Nothing like working in the shiproom during a Midwest snowstorm! Today I decided to fiddle with ball trucks and the closed heart collars. The plans call for blocks below the ball trucks (topmast caps). Chuck mentioned that to put a hole in them for the flag halliards would split the wood. I took a few swings at bat with a #37 drill bit in my little dremel and found I could drill them out. However, decided to put them in the top masts as he did...same process with no problem. Glued the little guys on top of the masts but made a little depression to hold some glue and align them in the mast tops. The ball trucks were made by cutting small cross sections from a dowel of appropriate size. Attaching the jib boom to the bowsprit took some thinking. No novice level references out there with step by step directions I could find...so others may find my pics helpful. As Chuck advises in the practicum, 0.018” thread used to attach the jib boom. Glued the jib boom to the wooden saddle first. Then used a tiny touch of CA glue applied to the rigging line to secure the thread on the bottom of the bowsprit on each successive wrap. ‘Hiding’ the terminating ends of the rigging was done using a threader as shown. Made sure the length of remaining rigging would be buried under the wrapping and not hang out the other side once I pulled it through. I have to say...it turned out looking pretty clean. I buried one hanging end on either side of the jib boom. Next was the closed heart collars. Two were made for the bowsprit using Chuck’s ‘easy’ way of tiring them off...CA glue touched to a simple slip knot. Pics are self explanatory. I made the closed loops off the bowsprit and slid them on once they were finished. Not a bad day’s work. Step by step. Moving on!!!
  4. just thought I’d share...trying to tie the siezing around each leg of the open heart with my big fingers was tough! Figures a workaround using a straw! Then just pushed the wrapping off the straw onto the leg of the open heart with tweezers, cinched it up, and a touch of CA on the inside. Not a bad result. I call it...the Straw Jig!
  5. Closed hearts are done and ready to put on the bowsprit. I can’t say they are perfect. But...I made them, and they turned out better than I’d hoped! Taking some trial swings at the gammoning before I try on the Sultana. Moving on...
  6. OMG...have I got stories on the center line....especially when you need to trace it on the keel! Good luck moving...and I'm happy to lend any historical experience your way I can send to aid you in your build! Cheers Pat
  7. Hi Anreak Gotta tell you...being referred to as knowledgeable was a shock! The Sultana is my first wooden model ship. If my model looks good so far, it's because I've got some great shipmates on this site, and a ship club I visit once a month which helps me be 'brave'. My Sultana is a patchwork of corrected mistakes! Mistakes are the best teacher...and so my, what little knowledge I have is from screwing up! LOL Rigging scares the bejeezuz out of me! I'm following Chuck Passarro's practicum (I hope you have it...if not, I can point you to where to download it) for the most part, and simply having fun. Between you and me...sanding and shaping the hull was the most challenging. I inhaled half the ship! Hope you continue with your build!!! Pat
  8. Question for the forum. I’m trying to find simple knots/techniques for the following: 1. Lanyards: where does it start and how does it end. Pics just show symmetric wraps between two hearts. Does someone have a technique? 2. Tying a line to a hook or an eyebolt: I see no simple instruction to do this. 3. Simplest knot to terminate an single loose end: the gammoning has no clear termination point. Any links to good material would be appreciated! Cheers!
  9. Okay. Happy New Year! Made a bit of slow progress. Although I can make some nice round bullseyes (closed collars) for the bowsprit, decided to use the closed hearts I made. It was my first attempt at seizing and they turned out nicely. Tied them onto the sprit in front of the chocks as Chuck does in the practicum. Not bad. Maybe oversized but I was focusing on doing a clean job. Also took time to stain some blocks for later. The stain really helps weather them and adds depth. Deep breaths...deep breaths...DEEeeeep breeeeaths...now for the open hearts. Moving on...
  10. Well...I’m off to Japan for the Holidays with the Admiral. Wishing you all a joyful Christmas and Happy New Year! Will be eager to finish the rigging on my return!
  11. Well, tales of my demise are still exaggerated!! I painted the open and closed hearts I made. Have the Syren spares if needed but pressing on. One bit of progress was noodling over the thimbles. Chuck made his out of thin rigging line. I decided to try and hollow out a tiny deadeye. Was tricky but it worked - so I made a few. These will be fastened to the eye bolts on either side of the fore mast to secure the lanyards for the mast stays. I think these are small enough, so I’ll give it a go...no painting these guys. Was a trial to get them made so I’ll let them stand out from the black rigging line. Moving on! Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays!!!
  12. ...by the way...the paper wrapped around the shaft of the masts is there to prevent oil from my hands getting all over the masts. (I was a messy baby, too.)
  13. Trestle trees painted. As are the bases of my main and foremast. Glued on the cleats at the base of each. Aligned by simply marking a piece of masking tape...taaadaa! Moving on!...

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