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GSege

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  1. GSege

    New guy building the Smuggler

    Hi guys and thank you for your comments. The book is on it´s way, excellent suggestion! I just had a brief look at Bob´s Smuggler; INCREDIBLE! Best regards, Gunnar
  2. GSege

    New guy building the Smuggler

    I guys, thank you for your reply. When I started to cut the hull templates yesterday evening, I quickly realised that the "wood log" in the kit only roughly resembles the actual hull. So, there have to be a significant amount of fairing after all. Studying the scribed veneer for the deck that is included in the kit, I also realised just how small a 2 mm deck plank really is! I will take one step at a time now and start with the hull fairing. Best regards, Gunnar
  3. Hi all! My name is Gunnar and I just joined this fine forum. After 45 years of being occupied with other things (you know, "life"), I at the age of 60 have started to build a model ship again. Just finished the "Lincolnville wherry" from Bluejacket (not exactly a ship but anyway) and my family has brought me the "Smuggler" from Bluejacket as a birthday present. Now, that is something else! Since I have spent all my life sailing, I am quite familiar with sail handling in general, so the much more complex rigging of a schooner isn´t that intimidating after all. The documentation mentions in a couple of places that you can go for a simplified method if you prefer and I would definitely consider to not overdo the finetuning of the hull shape. The most important thing with a hull is that it looks fair and if the templates doesn´t show any sudden bumps etc, I think I will be satisfied with that. However, with the deck I personally have a different opinion. I have allways felt that a beautiful deck is the first thing you notice on a yacht and I would really try to skip the scribed veneer that comes with the kit and instead do it plank by plank. The main reason is to avoid the simplified deck patttern on the quarter deck and possibly also the simplified "covering board" on the foredeck. A question for you: what would the preferred method of simulating the seams be? I have seen variants using pencil lead, wax crayon as well as acrylic paint. Best regards, Gunnar

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