Jump to content

Javier Baron

Members
  • Content Count

    182
  • Joined

  • Last visited

2 Followers

About Javier Baron

  • Birthday 02/28/1948

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    barcosbaron.wordpress.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Madrid - Spain

Profile Fields

  • Full NRG Member?
    MSW Member

Recent Profile Visitors

842 profile views
  1. Making of sail: I cut to bias strips of fabric of the desired width to imitate the sail cloths that make up the sails in reality. I stick the strips with textile glue, with a minimum overlap between them. I cut the sails to the size and shape needed for the model, I make the reef bands with a thin strip of fabric that I stick in its position. If the sail has patches in the corners, I hit them before the tablings. With strips of fabric of a minimum thickness I make the tablings, which are then stuck on the edges of the trimmed sail (on both sides). I stick a thread around the sail to make the bolt rope, leaving a loop in the corners to make the clue ropes. Finally, I put the reefs in the number and position that is required in the corresponding positions of the reef bands. Javier
  2. The tartana is finished. I have followed closely the monograph of the tartana Gemma (ANCRE), of Franco Fissore, although I have allowed myself some licenses because of the small scale. One of the aspects in which I have been guided totally by the monograph is in which the model has been rigged, with the jibs to starboard in a boom especially armed for it. I hope the result will be to your liking, because I have really enjoyed doing this
  3. For this model I am following the ANCRE monography of thr Gemma tartana, from which I put a picture. It is possible that the size of the patches is a little too big to see, but I think it is due to its dark color, which contrasts a lot with that of the sails. Javier
  4. Michael, I have used for the first time in this model bolts made in photo etch coming from a series of complements for the HMS Victory in scale 1: 100 made by Daniel Fischer, that I acquired in the International Convention of Model Shipbuilding that was made in Rochefort last October. The sheet that interested me was Number 7 of the set, with ringbolts and hooks in different sizes. Daniel Fischer is a member of this forum and participates in it with the name of dafi, and has a built log called “HMS Victory by dafi - Heller - PLASTIC - To Victory and beyond ...” The truth is that I had not noticed that detail of the eyebolts until you have indicated it, since it is not visible to the naked eye and only discovered if you look with a magnifying glass (and I do not usually use the magnifying glass when I make my models to avoid getting depressed ...)
  5. THank you very much everyone for your comments and your likes. Yes, Michael: I use strips of brass sheets of 0.1 mm. of thickness for the metallic pieces, like the hinges of the rudder blade.
  6. Painted the hull of the boat, I will continue with the rigging
  7. The covers of the hatches and the cabin of the camera are removable to be able to see the interior
  8. Thanks for your comments. Part of the interior of the ship can be seen, since I will leave the cargo hatches open and the door of the cabin half-open. In addition, one of the reasons why I build part of the interior carpentry is to give the hull greater rigidity. In the system that I use, the most delicate moment is just when the false bulkheads are pulled, since the hull only has 0.6 mm walls in its raw state, that is, before sanding.
  9. Thanks for your comments. Part of the interior of the ship can be seen, since I will leave the cargo hatches open and the door of the cabin half-open. In addition, one of the reasons why I build part of the interior carpentry is to give the hull greater rigidity. In the system that I use, the most delicate moment is just when the false bulkheads are pulled, since the hull only has 0.6 mm walls in its raw state, that is, before sanding.
  10. You're right, Dave; my technique can be applied to the auxiliary boats of the big ships instead of the traditional technique of doing it with a solid mold. The traditional system has as an important advantage in the possibility of using the mold many times and making an equal series of boats, which is important for steam boats of modern times, but has the disadvantage that it is very difficult to make boats of lines very sharp or that are of concave section with greater width in the waterline than in the line of the deck. Javier
  11. thank you very much, Steven, for your kind comment. I continue advancing in the construction of the tartana. The images that I show correspond to a somewhat earlier stage of the work, and in a short time I hope to be already reporting in real time.
  12. Thank you very much, Daniel. It's a pleasure to contact you again after Rochefort. I continued with the construction of the Ligurian tartana:
  13. A lot of thanks, Michael, for continuing to watch my work. Javier

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model shipcraft.

The Nautical Research Guild puts on ship modeling seminars, yearly conferences, and juried competitions. We publish books on ship modeling techniques as well as our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, whose pages are full of articles by master ship modelers who show you how they build those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you what details to build.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×