Jump to content

dmalcolm72

Members
  • Content Count

    40
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Recent Profile Visitors

78 profile views
  1. Well, quite a bit done since the last update. Again, I've diverted from the instruction book sequence for the sake of ease of construction (at least in my mind). I am delaying the installation of the foredeck until after I have installed the centerboard. But to do that, I need to have "other things" done first. So, here goes: I went ahead and installed the false stem and stern post and sanded them as instructed. You'll notice the addition of some wood filler to correct some imperfections in the assembly and to facilitate fairing the sides. Below is the false sternpost (unfinished): Finished false stem and sternpost: You can see a small "step" that I left on top of each. This is to accommodate the fore and aft decks (1/32" thick). I dry-fitted the aft deck and discovered that there was not enough overhang forward of the aft bulkhead (supposed to be 3/16"). A quick trip to the hobby store for a sheet of 1/32" x 4" basswood and I was able to cut a replacement deck. I decided to hold off on adding the stem and stern caps until after I have painted the two decks. The instructions call for painting these with the decks but I elected to cut them from mahogany scrap to provide some color contrast. I'll glaze them with clear gloss after installation. I test fitted the gudgeons on the false sternpost and adjusted the bevel for a good fit. Then I installed the skeg. This took quite a bit of careful sanding to get the curve to meet the curve of the bottom. The instructions showed the skeg flush with the back of the sternpost. To make it match better I sanded the back of the skeg to match the bevel of the post. I'm not sure if this is correct or not, but it looks smooth. I then cut out the rudder and marked it as the instructions indicated. A light coat of paint and it looks pretty good. Also at this time I made the tiller per the instructions. Again the pieces look pretty good. I'll stain and glaze the tiller before assembly and finish the painting on the rudder before assembly. During this time I also finished the display stand: That's it so far. I've actually done a little more on the centerboard and the decking but don't have any photos yet. I've gotten the bottom painted so I should be able to install the centerboard, thwarts, and foredeck in the next few days. In the meantime, I'm still working on the Longboat - adding planks...one small victory at a time...
  2. OK, well now that I've completed the travelogue... I've been busy with the Skiff since I got back: I elected not to install the fore and aft decks until after I completed the chine batten and the frame installations. As it turned out, this was a good thing. Most of the interior of the skiff as well as the thwarts had all been coated with the clear glaze. I had assembled the king plank and forward thwart with PVA glue that did not penetrate adequately to give me a solid joint. Same with the centerboard case attachment and the rear thwart. So, live and learn. This also gave me pause to consider the installation of the centerboard, the chine battens, and the frames. I think it will be easier to install all of these BEFORE I lock the thwarts and the decks in place. After these pieces popped loose it was relatively easy to trim and fit the chine battens. In retrospect, I could have spent more time in sanding the battens to fit flush on the bottom. There is more more gap than I would like in some places. Hopefully most of it will be masked by the forward thwart. I used a little thin CA glue to insure the centerboard case was firmly attached. And then I went off the rails with some personalization: I cut some 1/16" x 1/16" strips from the leftover mahogany. I elected to use it in lieu of the basswood pieces in Step #57. I also added two endcaps to the case, also in mahogany. I then proceeded to use install the first run of frames using CA glue to attach the frames to the hull. Again, a little more care could have been exercised in insuring the frames were perpendicular to chine batten and aligned with the pre-scored marks on the inside of the hull. The frames were all pre-stained to match the hull but were not glazed. Because I didn't glaze the frames I felt confident to use the PVA glue to attach the second row of frames to the first. I then let them dry before rough trimming. I used a clipper to do the rough trim of the frames: And then I used an emery board to sand the frames down flush with the top of the side: Finally, there's some scoring on the bottom of the skiff, but there does not appear to be a reason for it in the instructions. I'm considering adding a false floor to the skiff and use the scoring as a guide for location of the supports. I expect it will look something like this: Any thoughts on this? Is this appropriate, and reasonable from a practical (real world) perspective? More later as I get further along...
  3. Well, I decided to come back to the States a couple of weeks early. The Commodore was not able to make the trip so I wanted to get back before the start of the Holidays. The weather was beautiful, but a bit chilly some mornings with lows in the low 50's. And the diving was great! A friend took a camera on my last dive. The picture of me below was taken inside a small grotto inside a shallow reef. The statue is of the Virgin of Guadalupe, Patron Saint of Mexico. I've already removed a hull plank since I've been home and re-installed. I'm going to try and focus more on this project over the next few weeks...before I head back to Mexico for another round of "therapy."
  4. Well, I decided to come back to the States a couple of weeks early. The Commodore was not able to make the trip so I wanted to get back before the start of the Holidays. The weather was beautiful, but a bit chilly some mornings with lows in the low 50's. And the diving was great! A friend took a camera on my last dive. The picture of me above was taken inside a small grotto inside a shallow reef. The statue is of the Virgin of Guadalupe, Patron Saint of Mexico.
  5. dmalcolm72

    Black Pearl by Old Collingwood - 1/72 Scale

    Which "Hornblower?" The movie with Gregory Peck or the BBC program with Ioan Gruffodd? Both are excellent. I will bring mine down next trip. Hoping things go well with the Admiral Don
  6. Haven't gotten much done on the Longboat lately, but there are other rewards...
  7. The Skiff awaits my return, but in the meantime...
  8. Got the thwarts, king plank, and centerboard case glued into place. Now it can cure while the Commodore and I are relaxing in the sun...
  9. Haven't gotten much done on the Longboat lately, but there are other rewards...
  10. Well, I kind of slacked off this week. But I did get some work done. I'm actually working on a second boat concurrent with this one. It's a Chesapeake Bay Crabbing Skiff by Midwest. I spent most of the week working on the skiff. I did get two more planks on the longboat, though. This will be the last work I get done for a while; the Commodore and I are taking a much deserved long, tropical holiday. Sun, sand, tropical breezes, and for me: lots of diving.
  11. Well, I kind of slacked off this week. But I did get some work done. I'm actually working on a second boat concurrent with this one. It's a Chesapeake Bay Crabbing Skiff by Midwest. I spent most of the week working on the skiff. I did get two more planks on the longboat, though. This will be the last work I get done for a while; the Commodore and I are taking a much deserved long, tropical holiday. Sun, sand, tropical breezes, and for me: lots of diving.
  12. Got the thwarts, king plank, and centerboard case glued into place. Now it can cure while the Commodore and I are relaxing in the sun...
  13. Have been working diligently on the centerboard case and the associated pieces (mast step, forward and aft thwarts, king plank). I stained the mast step with Minwax cherry and allowed it to dry. I dry fitted it with the mast to be sure it was open sufficiently to accept the mast. I sanded it and then glued it into position. The thwarts, king plank, and the centerboard case all have 3 coats of clear on them with sanding between coats. I dry fit the pieces yesterday: Looking ahead I saw that there are two small pieces of molding to be installed on either side of the centerboard case. The instructions call for the use of 1/16 x 1/16 basswood, but if the boat will have mahogany trim on the gunnels, it would make sense to have mahogany trim on the case. There was ample scrap to cut a piece of 1/16 x 1/16 from the 1/16" mahogany sheet that provided the thwarts. I scribed it with my knife using the "TLAR" method to determine the width of the piece (TLAR = "That Looks About Right"). In assessing the dry fit it occurred to me that I need to insure the King Plank is flush with the forward thwart. To do this I cut a small piece of scrap and glued it into the notch for the King Plank. This insures a level plank when I fit these pieces together. I have got to get the centerboard case and the rest of the internal assemblies installed today. The Commodore and I are headed out on an extended voyage in a couple of days so I won't get any modeling done for a while. But sunshine, tropical breezes (and drinks), and scuba diving are definitely on the horizon. 🌴🌊🌴🌊🌴🍹☺️
  14. dmalcolm72

    Black Pearl by Old Collingwood - 1/72 Scale

    Here's wishing you and the Admiral all the best this Holiday season and throughout the new year. I sincerely pray that circumstances get better in the short, and long, term. Saludos, Don

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model shipcraft.

The Nautical Research Guild puts on ship modeling seminars, yearly conferences, and juried competitions. We publish books on ship modeling techniques as well as our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, whose pages are full of articles by master ship modelers who show you how they build those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you what details to build.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
Γ—