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Bava

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  1. 1814: British vs French Frigates!

    It´s actually the Venus (that´s not the Bellona-class Venus) from the danish archives and Vial du Clairbois' L'Embuscade which have almost the same main frame as the Conny. I´d love to know where I put those comparison pictures, though The only 'hard' data - i.e. speed in knots - I know of is the ship log of the Diana during her cruise across the Atlantic when she repeatedly made 14 knots. Otherwise these ships were famed for their stability under sail and their sturdiness (and - initially - their armament, as they got their 24-pounders from 1783 onwards). If I remember correctly, Endymion´s speed with a battery of 24-pounders was 13.5 knots, with 18-pounders 14.2. For a first-hand comparison of both classes, one might have to dig through russian archives as they made 10+ copies of the Venus and also build a couple of Endymions By the way, is there any data on how the fir Endymions compared to the original? And to Leander and Newcastle? Edit: After looking through my files, I might have to add another ship to the 18-pounder frigate list in my post above: the danish Havfruen-class. 26*18-pounders on rather modest 148' 3'', capable of 10.6 knots close-hauled and 13 running free.
  2. 1814: British vs French Frigates!

    Great post, John! Well, I think France had two 'peaks' when their naval designs - especially their frigates - were superior to that of other nations; first one was the tenure of Blaise Pangalo as master shipwright at Brest at the turn of the 17th century, second one was when Blaise Ollivier held the same post for a rather brief period in the middle of the 18th century. After all, it was him who finalised the design of the 'true' sailing frigate - i.e. a cruiser with two continuous decks - and the famous 'apple-shaped' body that was so typical of french (and danish) frigates until the end of the Napoleonic Wars. It´s a pity Ollivier died before he could contribute to the next step in frigate design, building larger ships that could carry a battery of 12-pounders. So it was up to Sir Thomas Slade to develop the 'stars' of this class, the Nigers and the Lowestoft. These ships set the standard for this type of frigate in the middle of the 1750s and still were at the end of the 18th century ( honourable mention goes to the american Hancock and Guignance´s Dédaigneuse-class, though). Which 18-pounder class was the 'best' is up for debate. Maybe Rule´s Livelys, maybe Sané´s Pallas-class, maybe even Constellation/Congress. When it comes to 24-pounder frigates and when we take into account what BW posted above - cruising endurance, cost, manning requirement, firepower, speed, stability, strength, longevity - , then there´s only one pick for me, af Chapman´s Bellona-class. La Forte/L'Ègyptienne supposedly had their problems with strength/longevity and the United States-class falls a bit short in the cost departement
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