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Jim Lad

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About Jim Lad

  • Rank
    Moderator

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Sydney Australia

Recent Profile Visitors

1,892 profile views
  1. Another Newbie

    Hello, and a warm welcome to the forum from 'Down Under'. John
  2. Hello from New Jersey

    Hello Skip, and a warm welcome to the forum from 'Down Under'. John
  3. Hello from Freehold NJ

    Hello, and a warm welcome to the forum from 'Down Under'. John
  4. Hello from Wilmington, NC.

    Hello 'Cactusman' and a warm welcome to MSW from 'Down Under'. John
  5. Hello from Upstate NY

    Hello Shean, and a warm welcome to the forum from 'Down Under'. John
  6. Hello all

    Hello Phillip, and another warm welcome to the forum from 'Down Under'. John
  7. Hello from Nebraska

    Hello Zac, and a warm welcome to the forum from 'Down Under'. John
  8. Ballina maritime museum

    Thanks for posting this, Steven. I haven't been to Ballina for ages, but must remember to re-visit the museum next time I'm there. John
  9. Hello from Croatia

    Hello Ivan, and a warm welcome to the forum from down in the land of the Kangaroos! John
  10. Pavel, this is a typical 'V' shaped wooden lifebuoy rack from a late 19th century sailing ship, the Polly Woodside. Other designs of racks wre used, but this one is of the period. John
  11. Good Morning, from Somerset.

    Hello Rory, and another warm welcome to the forum from 'Down Under'. John
  12. Some questions about shrouds

    Vinnie, shrouds were indeed set up in pairs, each pair made from one length of rope with an eye seized into it to go over the mast head, so one length would go from the deadeye, up and around the masthead and back down to the next deadeye abaft the first one on the same side of the ship. Shrouds were set up as follows; first pair on the starboard side, second pair on the port side, third pair on the starboard side, etc. If there were an odd number of shrouds, the single shroud was called a 'swifter'. Swifters were sometimes made up from one length of rope with an eye seized in the middle to go from the after deadeye on one side, up over the masthead and down to the after deadeye on the other side. Alternately, each swifter was made independently with an eye seized in the end to go over the masthead. Shrouds were normally served around the eye where they went over the masthead and down several feet to prevent chafing on rigging around the top. It was also common practice to serve the foremost shrouds on each mast for their full length to help minimise chafing of sails. John
  13. Hello from Portugal

    Hello Nuno, and a warm welcome to the forum from 'Down Under'. John
  14. Hello from Newbie in Georgia

    Hello Mike, and a warm welcome to the forum from 'Down Under'. John
  15. Hello

    Hello Mark, and a warm welcome to the forum from 'Down Under'. John

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