Jump to content

jud

Members
  • Content count

    905
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by jud

  1. Such handholds were rigged when appropriate, low overhead and you can hang onto the hatch combing going down, same when going up. Also size of the opening will determine if railings are needed. What the ship was doing also has some bearing on what safety or convenience devices were employed. As today, the only truthful answer can be, ' it depends'. Like today, Captains in those days did not want unnecessary injuries to crew, takes to much effort to train a crew to work smoothly together. I doubt you will find a hard and fast rule on this. Just enjoy the model, now if there is a ladder that is impractical, that bothers me, railings on ladders, nope, seamen, from experience, quickly learn how to safely use ladders, rails or no rails.
  2. Have you thought about a Coping Saw?
  3. LST 452

    The reason I copied and posted it. Few except an old "T' Sailor would appreciate it. jud
  4. I have brazed using brazing rods on sheet steel and cast iron, when I looked up the definition, silver soldering did fit into the definition I found. Requires higher heat, can be used for dissimilar metals and has high strength, requires a close fit up at small scales. My brazing around the Ranch using large rod and a full size torch, touching parts and a can of flux could fill gaps well, pre-fluxing would be required for close fits. When building up assemblies, I would think that the base structure would be better using brazing and then change to lower heat materials as the assembly progressed. All speculation on my part, based on my experience around the shop and what I have read. I expect and hope someone who has some first hand experience in using progressive lower heating joining products will step up with some comments. I have been slowly progressing towards building a LST at a large scale, " 1/50, be 6.4' long and a foot wide ', large so I can show detail, plan on using sheet steel for framing and hull using brazing rod or spot welding, followed up with silver solder for details. That is what I have running around in my mind for that project, might find that there is a good reason I have not seen anyone else using such a method on this site. Considering the use of all-thread with nuts and lock washers as rib stiffeners and spacers prior to any welding. Brazing is a method I happen to like and have the tools to use brass rods, but heat can create problems for small projects and Silver Solder seems to be the norm and upper end of the heat desired.
  5. LST 452

    From; ' LST ROUGH RIDERS SITE '. Dave LaBar 11 hrs Now me and a buddy and a guy named Joe took off on a can from Sasebo, The chow was poor and the fuel was low, but that doggone can could really go. Now along about the middle of the night, we were steaming along with all our might, When a cruiser behind us blinked his lights, blew his whistle and pulled into sight. We had twin screws on that little old can, which might have you think we were in a jam, But to you swabbies who don’t dig that jive that’s 16 boilers and an overdrive. Now we were men who likely knew we could race all night until something blew. That fantail was deep from the turn of the screws, but through the waves we flew and flew. Over the ocean we did glide, flying along with the throttles wide. The skipper screamed and the crew they cried, but we and that cruiser stayed side by side. We looked o’er the fantail ‘cause we heard something coming: sounded like a jet the way it was humming. It was coming along at a terrible pace, and we knew right then it was the end of the race. As it streaked by our side, we looked the other way, but, the crew of the cruiser had nothing to say. For there going by was a Reserve JG, pushing a hopped up LST !
  6. Ropewalk

    Needed about a foot of line for a project I was working on, did not have what was needed so rolled my own by hand and the help of a vice. Cut 9 threads, put an overhand knot at the end of the bundle of 9 and clamped it in the vice. Gathered 3 threads and twisted clockwise until they wanted to kink, and tucked it in my hand until I had all 3 twisted to the kink point, laid them together and from the end twisted counter clock wise, had what I needed. With the addition of some more hands or holding devices you can make rope without a rope walk. I have done the hand thing before using bailing twine, but were I planning on doing much, would be building something, the only real problem would be choosing which one from the many different plans you can find on the net. There is no requirement for planetary gears for an occasional home setup. do each bundle of threads separately with a way to hold them with the desired twist, then put them together and form your rope, much length and a separator or two would be handy. I suspect that the early home builders made their own line with the help of their spouses or kids hands as clamps.
  7. Sister gave me some photos I did not know existed, they are dated the summer of 1956 when I was 13. Anyone else have some early photos, like to see them and the story that goes with them. 1. Me pulling the combine from a John Deer Model "R". 2. Me on the tractor, we stopped to unload because Mom was driving the truck. 3. Me and my Cayuse Mare, 'Sandy'. 4. First Cannon, made it from an old hitch found in the iron pile, a pillow block from the same source, Arranged so a roll of caps could be placed in the pillow block inside the barrel, and a carriage bolt let in thru the holes I drilled so it could rest on the caps, a hammer blow would get a good bang and some smoke.
  8. Do it like is done on full size Block and Tackle, make your turns through the sheaves in the same direction as the lay of the rope after uncoiling and laying it out straight without twisting or kinks. Will still want to twist so put it under strain and leave it for enough time to train it, fibers will adjust themselves that way. Someone will probably be saying to soak in diluted glue when in position, secure it there until watered down glue drys.
  9. Enjoyed this very much, but I have ridden 3 of these, the storm scene about 2/3 of the way through was typical of the ride in rough weather, flat bottom they ride like a cork. Hope some will enjoy. https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DJsA_hW6DxGY&h=ATO4cfWT3EKTgqmhZ5lkPAjLSyZb-D15yxuoz-sH4TesmY87o8ovdw_cHAXjcdMBwW9r1tqpjDeQM_A0cgBGX06saQBQZQL8hMJRv_5sIOmn0mGhL0VksRU4z9ZeQncyPdtyMtk-dribDhDoH8MPI6uizHH0KC2Jv_rGFVa9pzabPT_g6sS9gNIujeAqPbUh8P9oSgT9SCFw_qU5lKRe0u3kPX6QWbABwn6QJH4UpdNMGpy41-6M5CIwNnTCT7fBNCfwD7VVQEePVsF6HjTUYlXPz1gLxov6yQ3eBQ1J
  10. LST 452

    The USS LST 542 was a Class 1 LST with elevator between the Tank Deck and Main Deck. Their Hulls were the basis of the 542 Class LSTs with main deck blowers moved from main deck, main deck reinforced so a larger and heavier deck load could be carried and a ramp to the main deck replaced the slow elevator. Point is, any class 542 LST model could easily be modified into the Class 1 configuration, photos and plans are available.
  11. PBS Series The Vietnam War

    We had that war won after the 68 Tet Offensive, all that followed was a waste caused by politicians and anti war protestors. They were the real killers of the war. Never so ashamed of our nation as I was when I watched the helos fly away from the embassy in Saigon, leaving those who had believed in us and were reaching out for help standing there to die. I did not watch this PBS program, I consider them promoters of left wing lies. jud
  12. Don't Tie Yore Reins To Th' Outhouse

    Don't tie yore reins to th' outhouse, most 'specially on a windy day,
    Some booger might come an spook yore horse, an' he'll drag it away.

    An' there you'll be trapped inside, holdin' on fer a jerky ride,
    Yellin' WHOA while tryin' t' git yore drawers up, an' loudly cussin' his ornery hide.

    Now he thinks th' outhouse is chasin' him, an' you ain't helpin' none verbalizin' loud,
    So he's just backin' up keepin' 'em tight, if he 'uz a ropin' horse you'd be proud.

    Finally it's dragged up agin' a tree, yore concentration shack ain't movin' no more,
    An' you sittin' there cussin' yore bad luck, 'cause it's layin' right on th' door!

    You look around an' then you see, th' truth slaps ya up side th' face,
    Th' light's comin' in thru' th' seat, th' only way out'a this place.

    A most awful disagreeable thought, can you shimmy out right thru' there,
    Hope nobody's quietly watchin', this is not a story you'll share.

    Or maybe you'll just kick off some boards, make another door on this contemplation shack,
    Just in case some other feller's in a hurry, ups an' ties his boogery horse on th' back.

    So you commence to doin' some kickin', gonna git out'a there you bet,
    Finally yore out Sears catalog in hand, 'cause you ain't done yore bizness yet.

    Andy G. Carr Copyright
    10/07/16
    Saw this paintin' by Bud Breen this mornin' and my mischevious, fertile mind was inspired to write this poem.
    Sharin' an' copyin' on Facebook is apreciated.

    Image may contain: outdoor
     

    Don't Tie Yore Reins To Th' Outhouse

    Don't tie yore reins to th' outhouse, most 'specially on a windy day,
    Some booger might come an spook yore horse, an' he'll drag it away.

    An' there you'll be trapped inside, holdin' on fer a jerky ride,
    Yellin' WHOA while tryin' t' git yore drawers up, an' loudly cussin' his ornery hide.

    Now he thinks th' outhouse is chasin' him, an' you ain't helpin' none verbalizin' loud,
    So he's just backin' up keepin' 'em tight, if he 'uz a ropin' horse you'd be proud.

    Finally it's dragged up agin' a tree, yore concentration shack ain't movin' no more,
    An' you sittin' there cussin' yore bad luck, 'cause it's layin' right on th' door!

    You look around an' then you see, th' truth slaps ya up side th' face,
    Th' light's comin' in thru' th' seat, th' only way out'a this place.

    A most awful disagreeable thought, can you shimmy out right thru' there,
    Hope nobody's quietly watchin', this is not a story you'll share.

    Or maybe you'll just kick off some boards, make another door on this contemplation shack,
    Just in case some other feller's in a hurry, ups an' ties his boogery horse on th' back.

    So you commence to doin' some kickin', gonna git out'a there you bet,
    Finally yore out Sears catalog in hand, 'cause you ain't done yore bizness yet.

    Andy G. Carr Copyright
    10/07/16
    Saw this paintin' by Bud Breen this mornin' and my mischevious, fertile mind was inspired to write this poem.
    Sharin' an' copyin' on Facebook is apreciated.

    Image may contain: outdoor
     

     

  13. I was fortunate in discovering decimal feet early on. It is what Surveyors use and I use it to measure or lay out. I can estimate down to a a tenth of a hundredth of a foot directly with satisfactory results, if I need better control I am forced to use other measuring tools divided into decimal inches only because measuring tools that measure in decimal feet only go down to hundredths of a foot, the advantage of metric is there are measuring tools available that meet machinists requirements, if decimal feet would catch on, the same could be done using that system. In my cad work it is decimal feet and I can use as many decimal places as needed to portray the precision need for the measurement. I convert feet and inches along with their fractions to decimal feet if I need to work with them. That is what your computer does with fractions of any flavor even inches are fractions of a foot, computers work with a Base 10 system which is also a fraction, just one clean to work with. jud Here is the wife measuring her reach in 7 month old dog, a tricky non-precise measurement method.
  14. When heavy guns are free to move with the roll of the ship, both in-haul and out-haul tackles are needed to maintain control of the gun. If your guns are ran out and secured, the in-haul tackles could be stored out of the way, but the deck rings should be in place for them. jud
  15. What do the plans call for, suspect a tiller only was used. Rigging for a Ships Wheel would probably be exposed on the main deck creating a hazard and be attached to a tiller anyway. Probably no room for a below decks tiller or quadrant. Just my opinion, nothing to back it up, so follow the plans. jud
  16. South China Sea

    . A thousand of these throw away ships were built in WW 2, they turned out to be keepers and have served many different ways down through the years. Their crews loved them, the crews were small and informal and found themselves doing things beyond the norm. I was lucky to have served aboard 3 of them and proud of it even after serving aboard a Fletcher Can and a Heavy Cruiser, liked the T's best. LST 821, USS Harnett County, is still serving, I was aboard, 67-68, her when she was a River Patrol Support Ship in Viet Nam Task Force 116, Task Unit 76.8.3. She was turned over to the Philippine Navy after transporting many refuges out of RVN, Renamed the Sierra Madre and later ran aground to serve as an outpost in the South China Sea. Here is a link to some of her story. https://www.navalhistory.org/2015/11/19/measure-of-the-sierra-madre
  17. Pets

    Badger, one week short of 8 months. Notice he is just standing up, he can reach the ceiling if he wants to. Control training is a must, we got him and quickly untrained the lap dog back out of him, dummies that can't think ahead. Cause and effect is no longer taught, requires pain or thoughtfulness. jud
  18. Will make even better pencil sharpens. Nice idea, but I advise acquiring some existing plans and stock materials. Start from scratch and end up with a proven rope walk. jud
  19. Pets

    Bob; Penny does looks a lot like Badger. Brother rode a horse named Penny when we were kids, she was out the my Cayuse Mare Sandy.
  20. I have used nail polish for lock tite, works good.
  21. R.I.P. Captain Bob

    Rest In Piece Captain Bob. jud
  22. tagerdvr; Never was around a quad 40, singles and twins. The Bofors, both single and twins I was around were manually fired by the right foot of the Pointer on the gun, he was often the gun captain because it saved one man for something else and a well trained gun crew worked that with no trouble other than preventing the gun Captain from moving around. On the LSTs I was aboard we had MK 51 directors which were gyro lead computing sights with a station for a man to manually crank in the range which he received from the sound powered phone system, not firing key on the director, the gun followed the director and the firing was by voice command. One reason I loved that Bofors was other than for training we left the covers on the directors and the pointer and trainer controlled the gun. Other ships, other guns, my experience with 3" 50s and 8"55s had all the options and director choices and controls running through barrel switches. Need to do some rethinking about the Power drives and firing circuits on the Bofors, we didn't use them in RVN, but they were set up for director control against aircraft and surface targets. More details will probably come trickling in overnight and I can make some corrections and additions.
  23. Pets

    Jim; Mother; purebred Dry Mouth New Foundland. Father; Mastiff, Doberman, Boxer, Australian Shepherd and blue Heeler. Guess you could call him a mutt, but has some good stuff in him and is a quick study. jud
  24. Lifes experiences

    Nothing beats the smell of fresh Gun Smoke in the morning. 67 or 68 RVN.
  25. Still get all those glass net floats or is something else used by the Japanese today? jud
×