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cookster

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About cookster

  • Birthday August 20

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Atlanta Ga

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  1. Shaping the hawse timbers is almost complete. I'm also framing out the foremost forecastle port and sill at this time. I'm using brass rod pins as I've been doing all along, and now also using pins made from copper wire as they are much smaller in diameter. These are .020" in diameter. If I choose to show bolts at some point ( I still haven't decided on that) I will use copper pins and coat them with liver of sulfur to turn them black. Thanks for looking and following along.
  2. I began shaping the knightheads using knives, chisels and sandpaper.
  3. Thanks Bob. I don't know how remarkable it is, but thanks for the generous compliment. It's still not a true POF model and I'm definitely cheating on lots of things. The guys that build true POF are the experts. Baby steps I guess Hopefully I'll get this bow section done soon, I'm ready to work on something else! But, I knew I would struggle so it's no surprise...
  4. Great start Mobbsie, good luck moving forward!
  5. I used a "few" clamps to clamp up and glue the knee and stem Since my last visit last year I have redone the can frames and hawse timbers again, now I am on version 3. Version 2 worked, but I discovered I had incorrectly shaped them. No one but me would've known, but I knew I could do better. I think the version I have now will work and I will be mostly satisfied. I don't think I can do any better, especially since these are based from plans I developed that I "hope" are accurate. Here is version 3 Still a long way to go before I finish them...
  6. Hi All, I'm back again. My apologies for another long break away from MSW and ship modeling. Sometimes life just has other plans... Anyway, I've made additional progress on the stem and knee of the head, using my mill to cut out the joints. Here's the stem and knee of the head so far, not finished yet
  7. cookster

    Joshua Humphreys' Notebook

    Just found this. Thank you, Thank you, Thank you!!!
  8. Amazing Bob! I always enjoy seeing your rigging, it's so neat and tidy.
  9. I'm again using the template routing method. I've described this before so no need to do again. Few more pics Here's milling the foot. It's not prototypical, but it's how I'm going to make it. Here's the back of the knee against the stem. And started shaping again. I hope THIS is the last time I have to do this.....
  10. Past time for an update. Since my last post I found my cant frames and hawse timbers were not shaped correctly. I had sanded them too narrow. Part of this error was a drafting error on my part, and the rest was from too aggressive sanding. So after much thought and frustration, version 3 was started. Here's a pic of the amount of error. It's not small.... I could've moved on with the shape as it was and no one would've known, but it would've bothered me forever and i didn't want that. Also I've gotten pretty good at making cant frames, (as I've had so much practice.... ) I decide it would't be so bad. This time I'm following a more conventional process on the hawse timbers and am making them individually, instead of as a group as I did before. This should allow me to get a more accurate shape. I'm also using Ed Tosti's method of templates on both sides of the frames. I hope this increases accuracy. Here's a few pics before any shaping. This time I'm also making and using using templates of the hull outline at various heights, again to try and increase accuracy. I'm also working on the knee of the head, finally something different! Here's a few pics of the pieces in various stages. I haven't finished the head yet.
  11. Looking very nice Bob, glad you weathered Matthew OK... You're really moving along!
  12. Thanks everyone! Mike, yes pins and screws are doing the job. I use #2 screws to secure the cants to the center bulkhead, and the pins are for alignment. I've seen many folks on MSW use that method, I can't take credit for it. Greg, coming from you that's an supreme compliment! You are one of the builders I strive to emulate.
  13. And finally, I assembled it all back together (temporarily) to see how she looks. The cants, hawse and bollards are now rough faired on the outside face. I took a bunch of pics so pardon the photoblast. Soon I'll start shaping and fairing the inside faces. I also need to finish drawing out the rest of the stem's various pieces, and start building it. Thanks for the likes and for following along...
  14. I finally got around to milling the foot on the stem. Here it is setup in the mill. I mentioned way back the rabbet on the stem would be a "fake" rabbet. The way I fit the the center bulkhead, stem and bollard timbers makes a rabbet so I won't have to carve it. This is not prototypical, but for me it will work. Here the stem is pinned on temporarily. You can see the where the rabbet will be. Adding the bollards and cants forms the rabbet.

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