kvnrykvn

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About kvnrykvn

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Hampton, VA USA
  • Interests
    I have an interest in anything historical. I like Early Steam Ships and Schooners. I like model trains as well (N scale).

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  1. Alex, I was on the USS Hayler 1992-1997. The Spruance class, had Non-Skid on all of the topside decks and many of the interior mechanical spaces. Non-Skid is a thick Black paint with gravel material in it. It was applied with a paint roller. As the Non-Skid aged it would fade to a grey. Often the deck department would thin out black paint and use it to re-paint the non-skid to make it black again. Of course this was highly flammable and illegal, so no one would admit to doing that. There would be a 3-4 inch waterway at the edge of the deck and along the superstructure painted dark Grey.
  2. Thanks, I have been looking for plans for the power drill wood lathe.
  3. Allan, The email is on the way. No rush on the sending the files, I am a long way from the rigging. Thanks,
  4. Allen, I would like copies of what you have. It would be a nice addition to my reference material. Thank You,
  5. Ron, You have convinced me! I have looked through my books as well and did not find what thought I had read. I am now planning on using wire rope for my shrouds. On an interesting note, about your note, someone gave me the plans for the Bugeye Edith Todd today.
  6. Ron, Please let me know what you find?
  7. Ron, I do not believe that wire rope was originally used for standing rigging on skipjacks. Most Skipjacks were built on the cheap. I believe wire rope was not routinely used on skipjacks until the 1930s. (Unfortunately I cannot remember where I read this. I may be wrong.) Wire rope would have been an extravagance in 1890 - 1900.
  8. Welcome aboard Rayjack6. The Steve Rogers book got me started on building my Skipjack as well. I recommend getting a copy of "Modeling Guide for the Model Shipways Kit Wilie L. Bennett" by Ben Lankford. Even though it is written for the Willie Bennett kit, it is generic enough and has a lot more information the Steve Roger's book. Another book that I recommend if you are interested in the history of Skipjacks is "Notes on Chesapeake Bay Skipjacks" by Howard I. Chapelle. Good luck and I look forward to seeing your Skipjack build.
  9. Kees, Can't wait to see what else you have found.
  10. Thank you all for the wonderful stories. I hope to contribute a couple shortly. Thanks,
  11. Lindsay, What I found about your ancestor is that he started in the Continental Navy. He eventually became a privateer. I found the following in John Paul Jones Manuscripts from the Library of Congress. "1776 Dec 8 J[ones,] J[ohn] P[aul.] Capt. U.S.S. 'Alfred.' Alfred at sea. Orders to John Margeson. Appoints him to command the prize Betty; is to accompany Alfred; if separated is to proceed to nearest port of the United States."He took command of the Privateer "General Lincoln" (Guns 10, Men 50) 22 Dec. 1777. Hope this helps.
  12. Linday, I did a search using ("General Lincoln" privateer 1776). The first link is for a list of America Revolutionary War Ships. "Granville Hough's Ship Listings G - Awiatsea.com" http://www.awiatsea.com/Other/Hough%20List%20G.html. There are 7 ships named General Lincoln listed. I looked into some of my history books and found that John Paul Jones' first capture, was the brigatine Sea Nymph, out of Barbados in 1776. I did not find a General Lincoln associated with Jones. However I did find a Brigantine named General Lincoln captured by Abraham Whipple in 1780. It was commanded by Hoysted Hacker. It was later captured in Charleston SC. There may be confusion between Jones and Whipple, both were well known during the revolution. Do you know the name of the captain? The more information on the ship, that you can provide, will help. Good luck on your research.
  13. Will Bluejacket be offering this class again next year?
  14. Ron, I look forward to following your lead. Thanks,
  15. I too, have always wanted to build a model of the Great Eastern. Thank you for all of the information.