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Found 7 results

  1. To be honest, the boat in this diorama will be built near the end of the project. The diorama is going to be a working lift-span bridge with a boat traversing underneath it. The bridge fits on a 2.4 x 1.2 m (8 x 4 ft) tabletop. The scale is 1/72. There are no available plans for the bridge. Created my own plans from photographs and two diagonal reference measurements (road width and span length). An antiquated control console of the actual bridge will be converted to operate the model. Created my own electronics for the diorama. I am a volunteer for the Ballina Naval & Maritime Museum. They are funding the material costs. The diorama will be an interactive display for the museum. This is my second model I have ever built. The first was done 26 years ago. It was a 1/10 scale working Tesla coil used in Colorado Springs in 1899. The current model is halfway to completion. My task is not to make an exact reproduction, but a close simile. Available materials limit the accuracy, but I endeavour to do what I can. The boat is not following any plan other than my own. It has to look symmetrical because the boat only travels along a straight line under the bridge forward and back. Seventy percent of the project will not be directly related to the boat. I have considered the Shore Leave forum but felt that it would get in the way of all those fun threads and other non-modelling topics. So I hope you all don't mind me being here. The model is based on this bridge located at Wardell, NSW, Australia. The display area for the diorama will be something like this.. There are quite a few photographs to upload - to catch up to where I am currently at. When I do catch up I'll let you know in the post. to be continued.
  2. Hello friends of the smaller ships out of the line of sight of the three-decker-enthusiastic public! An additive foreword: Due to my working situation I am parttime in the NL in a small hotel without any possibilities to model anything. And the problem is for me being so tired that I'm not able to concenreate to do anything more than monkey work or pure reading. But in the other hand there is nothing to do elsewhere in town - so I'm forced to stay in my hotelroom filling my time. (I do not use the TV due to semireligious matters.) By reading Ian McLaughlan's fantasic book „The Sloop of War 1650-1763“ - I came across the chapter about the French Corvette and Privateer Construction. In here I saw her the first time and fall in love to „La Amarante“ a little masterpice of Blaise Ollivier. Built at Brest in 1747 she shows all the decorational pomp of the late baroque/early rokkoko in a limited area on a ship able to fit a flat's livingroom even in 1:36. But for my travels dutys I halfed the size. The ship is drawn by the fanstastic Delacroix and publiced in a Ancre style monography for around £90. The drawings are amaizing and due to my future regular business travels to NL I can't work on a model in hotel. (Okay I could, but than I would need a new hotel to stay.) I am too tired not to harm even a card model. So I'll spend my free hours far away from family by recherche work on L'Amarante. This due to the factum that Delacroix's drawings and the contemporary drawings of the transom differ. Also I like to figure out more of the details. This work will be the fundament for the scratchbuilding and for several month hardly anything will happen on the shipyard. The fact is I can only work with the very „omni-glot“ part of the book - the drawings; as I never had had got more than a couple of French lessons at school at all. In the 80th Delacroix book was still unwritten and my person didn't know about him - but if, I would have been more enthusiastic about French lessons if I would know about L'Amarante! Inbetween I was able to scale the drawings down to 1/72 to start a mobile try-it-out project. You find the photos arround here. As I do not own a mill a PoF-model is impossible - so I do plan a vaneer covered plywood pile hull. My idea is to use the drawings of the frames to cut out as filled - so as bulkheads. The bulkheads pileon bukkheads with fillers between them to a hull - a PoB-model with the number of bulkheads as frames would be on a PoB&F-model. I have th number fo the 52 frames but I'm building 52 bulkhads plus filling pices. So the surface is very large to glue 1 to 1,5mm vaneer on it. But I never tryed! So I have got the one and only question: Is my way a silly thing to do to a 550mm hull? So I'm singing „Richmond is a hard road to travel“ and do start with some pictures from my collection for you. Best wishes to all of you.
  3. Hi fellow builders, After 2 years of trying to build the HMS Victory, using the Caldercraft kit I think it's time to show some of my efforts on this forum. I live in Utrecht, The Netherlands, and I regard this as a 10-year project. Building is the fun part, time is of no essence as the fun is much less when the model is finished (speaking for myself). I chose the HMS Victory for several reasons: - The Caldergraft kit is essentially historically correct, although some research is still necessary. - The kit is technically very good, most parts fit without much adjustment - The "original" 1805 Travalgar version of the ship can still be visited in Portmouth and plenty of photo's circulate on the internet, therefore building a historically "correct" model is easier than of many other ships. - Many books can be found on the subject like Longridge, McKay and others. over time I collected a (very) small library on the subject. - There are some build logs of the Victory on the internet of excellent builders, notably Gil Middleton. In some instances my choices differ from theirs, but I will explain my choices as much as possible. In the weeks to follow I wil show the progress so far, which is as far as the 30 cannons on the Upper Gun Deck. Some basic facts about the HMS Victory: The HMS Victory was (and is) the flagship of the English Navy which defeated the combined French-Spanish fleet during the Battle of Trafalgar. Admiral Lord Nelson was mortally wounded during battle by a French sniper, but England won the battle. The HMS Victory is the 5th ship with this name and the largest by far. The ship was ordered in 1758. It is a First Rate Ship with more than 100 cannons. The design of the ship was completely devoted to firepower In 1805 (Trafalgar) ther were: - on the Lower Gun Deck: 30 cannons for 32-pound balls - on the Middle Gun Deck: 28 cannons for 24-pound balls - on the Upper Gun Deck: 30 cannons for 12-pound balls - on the Quarterdeck: 12 cannons for 12-pound balls - on the Forecastle: 2 cannons voor 12-pound balls and 2 carronades for 68-ponds balls(!!) The total length of the ship is about 70 meter, water displacement more than 2000 tons and almost 5500 square meter of sail can be carried. Some other numbers: 40km rope in the rigging, 1400 blocks, 300 tons of "potable" water, 50 tons of coals, 20 tons of wood, 50 tons of beer, etc. Index First and second planking Wales Gunports Coppering Upper gun deck, cannons and fittings Quarter Deck Forecastle Bow Poop Deck Stern Fascia First an impression of the progress so far. I will try not to bore you with every individual bulkhead and plank. Details will be provided on request (of course).
  4. As inbetween project (to much repetitive stuff with Syren and Sherbourne atm ... ) and as a XMas gift for my father I started this little ship. The Maria HF 31 was a fishing Ewer from Hamburg/Finkenwerder. Thats very very close to where I live btw Build 1880 she operated until 1950. During this period she has undergone several rebuildings, including motorization. The Ship is restored and has it's place in the "Deutsches Museum" in Munich. Another reason for this build was my curiosity about the kits from Daniel Dusek. From what I read and saw on youtube they look very promising (and indeed, they are). First some pictures of the parts. PRO: ++ Very good Wood (Pear!!) ++ Very good laser cutting ++ Very good Photoetched Parts ++ Full lasered planks ++ Double Planking ++ Affordable ++ Solid construction CONTRA: -- Manual -- The images on the packaging (I will revise Pro/Contra while building if necessary) There are all parts to build the Maria as Sailing Ewer or as motorized one. I will build the sailing version. I will try to build OOB but can't promise I allready bought the book "Ewer Maria" with a lot of pictures and informations. Actual State: cheers, Dirk
  5. This build log will cover my building of the 1:72 Revell plastic kit of the Gato class submarine. The decals that come with the kit are for the USS Drum and USS Albacore. However, the fairwater, or conning tower, does not match either boat. But it does match that of the USS Cobia, which is what I will model here. Besides the kit itself which is 52 inches in length when completed, I have also purchased the complete "Big Ed" set of brass photo-etched parts for this kit from Eduard. Where I will display it I haven't decided yet, but it will be on the work bench for quite some time. Painting will mostly be done by airbrush, which I am quite the novice at using. But it should be fun to build. While not needing the skills to build like the wooden kits, I wanted to add this particular model to the log entries due mostly to the size of the model itself. (From Wikipedia:) The United States Navy Gato-class submarines were launched 1941–43 and were the first mass-production US submarine class of World War II. Together with their near-sisters the Balao and Tench classes, their design formed the majority of the United States Navy's World War II submarine fleet. Named after the first vessel of the class, USS Gato, the Gato class and its successors formed the core of the submarine service that was largely responsible for the destruction of the Japanese merchant marine and a large portion of the Imperial Japanese Navy in World War II. Gato's name comes from a species of small catshark. Like most other U.S. Navy submarines of the period, boats of the Gato class were given the names of marine creatures. USS Cobia (SS/AGSS-245) is a Gato-class submarine, formerly of the United States Navy, named for the cobia. Cobia (SS-245) was laid down on 17 March 1943 by Manitowoc Shipbuilding Company, Manitowoc, Wisconsin. She was launched on 28 November 1943 (sponsored by Mrs. C. W. Magruder), and commissioned on 29 March 1944, Lieutenant Commander Albert L. Becker in command. On 1 July 1970, the Navy struck Cobia from the Naval Register, and she was towed to Manitowoc, Wisconsin to serve as an international memorial to submariners. In 1986, Cobia was incorporated as a part of the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, declared a National Historic Landmark, and placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Cobia is permanently docked at the Manitowoc River's mouth at Lake Michigan.
  6. Hiya Folks, Just read the log guidelines and just opening my log. Hope I've complied with the forum rules. Received my model today via UPS. Only my second build and first on here in front of an audience!!! Hope it goes well. Hoping to have it completed in a couple of months - work permitting. However setting deadlines is probably the worst thing I can possibly do. Deep breaths ... Next step gonna complete an inventory on the parts/materials and instructions and give first impressions later or tomorrow. Thanks Sean
  7. Short overview of building process of the Double boat of Russian Imperor's fleet by Master Korabel. Illustrated instruction can be taken here. http://bulk-share.slickpic.com/album/share/Ez4QDNQ1JNkDhD/8140182.0/800/p/16.jpg http://bulk-share.slickpic.com/album/share/Ez4QDNQ1JNkDhD/8140183.0/800/p/17.jpg http://bulk-share.slickpic.com/album/share/Ez4QDNQ1JNkDhD/8140184.0/800/p/18.jpg

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