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Found 10 results

  1. Hello All, I've recently downloaded the latest version of Sketchup and intend to start working on some plans. I apologize if some of my questions have been covered elsewhere or if it becomes immediately obvious that my ambitions far exceed my potential skill, but here goes. First, is there a way to import a scanned (jpeg or other type of image file) of a plan into Sketchup to begin adding lines, etc.? Also, is there anyone here that is using Sketchup for a 2D set of plans to develop framing and working drawings for a ship model? I've seen quite a few 3D discussions, but someone's step-by-step approach - sort of a "Ship Model Plans In Sketchup For Dummies" - with me being the dummy, would be hugely helpful. Many Thanks, Bill Abbott www.abbottcartoons.com
  2. I have an old Mamoli 1/53 scale Golden Hind kit that my wife gave me years ago. Over time, I lost most of the plans. Does anyone know where I can get a complete set of plans? Thanks much, Tim
  3. World War II American High Speed Transports (APD) Colhoun Class (Wickes Hulls): A Study in Blueprints by Duane D. Borchers Annapolis, MD: Maryland Silver Co., 2001 11” x 17”, softcover (Acco-Press type covers), viii + 133 pages tables, plans, index. $60.00 I came across this book while researching a model of the WW II high-speed transport USS McKean (APD 5), a converted WW I era flush deck Wickes class destroyer. The book is one of a series of similar reference books in Maryland Silver Company’s A Study in Blueprints series covering primarily 20th century US Navy ships. This volume contains the following information: table of contents tables of ship characteristics for selected ships of the class (dimensions, displacement, capacities, manning, armament, etc.) ship’s history for each ship in the class, drawn primarily from the Dictionary of American Fighting Ships (DANFS) ships plans, taken primarily from booklets of general plans for selected ships of the class, augmented with a large scale body plan index The book is printed on 11” x 17” copier paper. Tables and text are reproduced well, but drawing quality varies, no doubt based on the quality of the originals. See samples below: I found the book to be a very useful reference source and can recommend books of the series to others in need of similar information.
  4. Hello! I am new here, for the record. And I am looking for plans of this ship, named Santísima Trinidad y Nuestra Señora del Buen Fin. She was built in the Bagagtao Shipyard in the Philippines and was one of the largest manila galeons made. What I need is that if you have photos, plans, blueprints or other stuffs, I would gladly appreciate it thanks!
  5. I am looking to build a ship from scratch. I Am a descendant of William F Sturgis of barnstable Massachusetts. He was the captain of many ships and I would like to build one of them. I have been looking around the internet and can't find the ships. I think I want to build the Atahualpa but need to find one of these in plan form. I hope some one with experience in researching ships could guide me on where to find these ships. William F. Sturgis (February 25, 1782 – October 21, 1863) was a Boston merchant in the China trade, the California hide trade and the Maritime Fur Trade. Eliza,Ulysses,Caroline,Atahualpa all are merchants I think around 1800 In 1809, his ship the Atahualpa, owned by Theodore Lyman http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_F._Sturgis
  6. I spent quite a bit of time learning how to read the Mamoli rigging plans. Since there were no explicit instructions on how to interpret the drawings I spent a great deal of time looking through them before I figured out their method. Once I did, it was pretty straight forward. I thought perhaps others might find this useful. Perhaps this is how all rigging plans are done. Since the Connie is my first kit, I have no reference. I also need to mention this kit was purchased in 1991 so it may have changed. However for what it is worth here is how my plans are interpretted. There are two tables on each rigging page. The first table is on the right and lists all the parts, this is standard on all the Mamoli pages. However the second table, placed directly to the left of the first left is only on the rigging pages. the tables are not really labeled or numbered but they are consistent on how they arrange them. The only difference is where they are placed on the plan. For this illustration I will show how to interpret the rigging on the Mizzen (part o552) circled on the drawing. Here is a copy of the appropriate section from the plans: This shows a rigging set running from the tip of one of the Mizzen booms to the cap just above the Main Mast's fighting top. First we need to see what the parts are for this rigging. The size of the line, the size of the blocks, etc. For this we turn to the right most table on the plans. This table is on all of the plans an lists the all the parts of the ship as well as the various sizes. In some cases, the part number might refer to a different page of the plans if the part was installed much earlier so you might have to refer back to another page of drawings. Here is a copy of the section in the table dealing with the rigging for this piece. We can see here that 0552 (o552 in the above drawing) is labeled Braccio (which means "Arm"), the second column tell us that the amount is the same as the above parts, which is 2, although you can't see that in this photo. More importantly, the second column from the right says 0,25, which means this is the 0.25mm line. So now we know the size of the line, let's see where it runs. The second table directly to the left of the parts list table contains the order a line runs by listing the part numbers in the order they go starting at the lines termination in the rigging and ending at the termination on the deck. The entry for 0552 shows 0552 D = 0554+055+0554+0556 (fig 10). This is chock full of valuable information. Ignore the pencil marks, that is how I track when I install a line. First the line will start at at part 0554. We can look on the first chart and see 0554 is a block (Bozello) that is made of walnut and is a single 4mm block (1x4). This also refers to a figure (fig. 10) for more information. This figure is shown below: This shows the manner the blocks are attached to the mast cap. If we want more information on the rings we can refer back to the first drawing of the rigging and see this part is 0553. Referring back to the first table we can see that part 0553 is a 3mm brass eye ring (Anello con Gambo = Ring with shank) the OTN refers to a table in the general instructions that shows it is made of brass. So after the two rings are installed on the cap, the block is added with the .25mm line attached to it. This then runs to the block 0555. The table tells us this is also a 1x4 walnut block that is attached to the end of the spar. The line then returns to 0554 and runs toward the deck. As a note here, if the line also went through the fighting top, that too would have been listed in the order the line ran through it. In this case it does not but goes directly from the block (0554) to part 0556, which table 1 informs us is a belaying pin (Caviglia). The termination point is shown not only in the table but also in the rigging diagram. The sheet also has a diagram showing the layout of the termination points when viewed from the rigging. From this we can see that 0556 is the third belaying pin aft in the 4 pin belaying rack located on the starboard side between the two fife rails. The port side has a matching set for the matching mirrored rigging set. So that is it. A further note on terminations, if a line terminates tied to a side shroud, the shroud grouping is noted and it is numbered from front to back. So the rigging drawing would show the shroud set from the side and give you the number it would be referred to as. This would look like the following: Any lines terminating on one of these shrouds will be labeled 16(x) with x being the number of the shroud from the bow. The following drawing shows how this shroud is referred to int he rigging drawing. So this shows the top line would terminate on shroud set 16 on the 6th shroud. The one below is marked to terminate on the 5th shroud. It is hard to read but you can see my pencil marks to the left of the number. So this is how the rigging plans work. I stopped working the lines from the top of the table down since they tended to number the lines from the bottom up. This meant that the top lines which normally run down the center of the ship, had to be fished through the other lines. However, other than that, I have ben following these diagrams pretty much as they are drawn. [ dia=core:attachments:202725]
  7. building bluenose ll

    have wood model of bluenose. got from friend.one problem no instructios.you anybody can help me please e-mail me at kwood1954@sbcglobal.net. thank you for any help . made by artesania latina scale 1:75 ref:20500 tried mfg. no help from them
  8. I have the model and do not have plans. Any help out their? Thanks
  9. Title: The Ships of Abel Tasman Author(s): Ab Hoving & Cor Emke with an introduction by Peter Sigmond Year: 2000 Publisher: Verloren, Hilversum, The Netherlands Language: English Edition: First ISBN: 90-6550-087-1 Pages: 144 Book Type: Softcover Extra: This box contains a book (Dutch, English or German), 40 printed drawings scale 1:75 and a cd-rom. The cd-rom includes Plans for both the Heemskerck - yacht and the Zeehaen - fluit for the following metric scales: 1:50, 1:87.5, 1:100 and 1:150. The plans are in HPLT format. Any decent CAD app. can read this. I use TurboCAD Deluxe 20 and it reads it well. The cd-rom also includes tabels in Microsoft Excel for Every measurement in Every scale and lots of pictures of the model, paintings of these types of ships and maps. Summary: As described in his preserved extract-journal, Abel Tasman had two ships under his command during his memorable voyage to the mysterious 'Southland' in 1642: the yacht 'Heemskerck' and the fluyt 'Zeehaen'. According to historian Peter Sigmond, head of the department of Dutch History of the Amsterdam Rijksmuseum, these ships can be placed in the same rank as ships like the 'Santa Maria', the 'Golden Hind' and the 'Endeavour'. Ab Hoving, head of the restoration department working for Sigmond, built models of these ships. Cor Emke has recorded the entire (experimental) building process on cad drawings. These drawings are not only printed but also recorded on cd-rom. This cd-rom enables the model builder to examine and print each part of the ship in a scale selected by himself. In the book to which the cd-rom belongs, Peter Sigmond describes the historical background of Tasman's expedition. Original illustrations from Tasman's journal, and paintings and pictures of yachts and fluyts illustrate the narrative. The book also offers an analysis of seventeenth-century shipbuilding; an account of how the models were built; a typology of the ships Tasman sailed with and a lot of information from which anyone interested can make his own choice in order to construct his model. My Personal Interest. Some of the modelers in this site know that my interests is in Dutch ships, preferably VOC and flat & round bottom boats. For a couple of years I have been looking for boats to scratch built. To start with I am going to built the Statenjacht "Utrecht". From there on I wanted something larger, challenging and historical. As I read anything about the VOC I have been reading a lot about Australia (Anthony van Diemens landt), New Zealand (Named after the Dutch Provence Zeeland) and Tasmania (last name of the explorer). So decided that the Ships of Abel Tasman would be a challenge and different. (I enjoy building boats that very few people built). I had difficulty obtaining the book, but found out that a member of my local nautical club, Bob F., had the book in possession and was willing to part with it. Purchased the book and have been reading it and studying the plans. The printed plans in the book are in scale 1:75 which is of a good size. If I am energetic enough I may do the boats in scale 1:50. I plan to do the jacht 'Heemskerck' first and when I have more experience with building do the fluit 'Zeehaen' last. The fluit looks so odd to me. Small waist (deck), big buttom (hull). Pear shaped boat with a large cargo bay near the waterline and a narrow deck. For the members of this site that do not know what the purpose of a fluit was is the following: The Dutch had to pay high taxes to Denmark which was assessed based on the area of the main deck and this is how the fluit came about. It was not built for conversion in wartime to a warship, so it was cheaper to build and carried twice the cargo, and could be handled by a smaller crew. Minimized or completely eliminated its armaments to maximize available cargo space. Construction by specialized shipyards using new tools made it half the cost of rival ships. These factors combined to sharply lower the cost of transportation for Dutch merchants, giving them a major competitive advantage. Another advantage was a shallow draft which allowed the vessel to bring cargo in and out of ports and down rivers that other vessels couldn't reach. The fluit gained such popularity that English merchants build similar looking ships. Here is a link of a person in Germany that built the Zeehaen. Excellent built. http://www.modelships.de/Fluyt-Zeehaen/Photos-ship-model-fluyt-Zeehaen_details.htm Thank you for reading. Marc
  10. We all value the plans we have gotten, from kits or just buying the plans themselves. Navigational charts are really expensive and each time they are folded or rolled there will be tension to them. If not protected, they will fall apart where they have been folded. I remember my father covering his charts with a transparent film, which I have found available through one of many office supplier companies. This one was only 18" wide, hopefully I will be able to find a 28" + for the wider plans. On this film I can use dry-erase sharpies and wipe off the lines later on. This way my plans will be protective from UV-light and mechanical strains. The film is soft enough to be rolled or folded.
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