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  1. Have you ever browsed through your favorite build to see what the full build looks like at the present time? Have you ever wondered what else is being built on MSW 2.0, it may be a kit, scratch, R/C, card or plastic, or any other material, including digital reconstruction. I am inviting all members to post a latest photo of their build (side elevation)and a link to that build, so everyone can see what it looks like, and give others an idea of what else is going on. I am not trying to create a multitude of build logs under one topic, just photo’s so we can all see what is going on. This will possibly help others in deciding on what to build next Anyone interested?
  2. ANOTHER H.M.S. Victory build log! But this one will be different. I’m going to skip all the hull construction and shroud installation and climb right up into the rigging. I haven’t any choice really since there are no photos of that part of this build. I started this model in 1997 or so, it was my first ship model. I’m starting this build log January 10, 2015. H.M.S. Victory needs no introduction but I would like to place this model into the context of my personal background. In the 1990’s I was not even vaguely interested in ships, I was an aircraft nerd and I built 1/48 scale plastic aircraft kits. One day I bought a copy of The Price of Admiralty by John Keegan, a popular history book containing essays on different aspects of naval warfare illustrated with historical battles as examples. I got the book for the Battle of Midway content but upon reading the rest of the book I read about the Battle of Trafalgar for the first time and I was fascinated. Around the same time New York City hosted Op Sail again and I saw many traditionally rigged ships for the first time and this helped the fascination deepen. Finally, I had been reading Fine Scale Modeler since I was a kid and for a certain period in the 90’s they used to run this full page ad on the back page of every issue. Maybe you remember it. Another year went by and I couldn't shake the idea that I wanted to build this large daunting complex plastic kit. I finally got the kit and started building it.
  3. Late summer 1805, the sun is burning inexorably from above, the wind is completely asleep, the sea is smooth as glass. The dispatches have already been exchanged. The master of the small cutter has just returned to his tiny vessel. Behind it there is towering the enormously massiv silhouette of the huge black and ocher striped three decker. Through the open gunports the lashed up guns can be seen. Also the officers' cabins ports are wide opened by the order of the Captain's to ensure an optimal ventilation of the hot and steamy lower decks. Clatter of activity on some guns being ran out cuts through the silence. The rumble of the heavy guns rolling over the decks and the trampling of countless bare feet and the short shouted commands supported by a multitude of hand signs originate from the ordered gundrill for new gun crews and their officers. In competition between the three decks they are fighting for the fastest rate of firing. The rest of the ships crew is occupied with cleaning and mending duties. The holystone are scratching on the decks. Above all the sails hang slack in their yards. No breath of wind moves them. They are nestled heavily over stays and fighting tops. The captain took advantage of the hot calm to put up all the canvas possible for airing. One of the studdingsails is taken in, the spar tied up with its inner end against the shrouds, in order to mend something on its fittings. Sitting on a swing seat pendent from the fore top, a crew member just is finishing painting over with ocher the originally black coloured mast loops. On the poop Captain Hardy monitors the young cadets´ training in navigation, supported by Lord Nelson, who uses the opportunity to entertain the cadets with stories of his actions and the ideas of his tactical concepts. But in the back of everybodys mind there is just one question - When will there be wind again ...
  4. I was originally going to try and build a pob model of the Bluenose. After pricing out the model, paints, tools, shipping, taxes etc I came out with a price of around $400Cdn. I passed it by the Admiral and got the 100 yard death stare, then she asked is there something a little less in cost to start out with first to make sure it's something you'll enjoy. So I'm looking at plastic now instead of wood for my first build. Was looking at Revell's Constitution in 1/96 scale. Your thoughts and suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Bruce
  5. Good evening everyone The kit is ordered, the Deluxe PE kits is not available in the UK at present, should be another couple of weeks The Victory is safe and secure for a while, and will be finished The Workroom has had a bit of a make over as well, i put a window in at the weekend, at last i have some natural light in there and a different carpet as the one i had, it was impossible to find anything when dropped onto it, research http://www.ipmsstockholm.se/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=2250&start=30 http://www.kbismarck.com/models/ http://3dhistory.de/wordpress/3d-models/dkm-bismarck/bismarck-high-res http://www.shipmodels.info/mws_forum/viewtopic.php?f=59&t=144178 http://www.bismarck-class.dk/shipmodels/shipmodels_menu.html https://www.facebook.com/BismaarckModell148Scale/photos_stream http://www.bismarck-class.dk/shipmodels/shipmodels_menu.html
  6. I've finally found the time to reconstruct my build log after the great crash of 2013 Some of the pictures are lost so the log does not start at the beginning. This is my first serious foray into ship modeling. I say first serious attempt because 30+ years ago I built a Revell USS Constitution. But I was still in High School and not very concerned with accuracy or craftsmanship. I just wanted to finish the kit and display it. This kit of Soleil Royal was given to me as a gift way back then and I am just getting around to continuing building it. I am very much looking forward to a build that I can be proud of. Even though I know that my skills are not up to par with some of you I am trying to incorporate as much research and accuracy as I can muster in a plastic kit. Here are some of the pictures of what has been done. I'll try to summarize what I've done so far to catch everyone up. I decided to display the ship with all gunports closed to starboard and opened on the port side. Eventually I plan on setting just the fighting sails (topsails, mizzen, and perhaps the spritsail topsail) with the courses clewed up. I did not like the look of the eyebolts supplied with the kit so I replaced them with brass. The holes for them were drilled and the eyebolts pass completely through the upper wale. The ends will be trimmed and bent over to lay alongside the inner bulkhead. The ends will lay inside the gap between the hull and the upper bulwarks, in an area that needs to be filled anyway. Doing the eyebolts this way should also prevent any pullout cause by strain from rigging. I am leaving the lower hull unpainted for now until a proper cradle/base is finished. I don't want to ruin the paint job. It will be painted a dirty white to represent white stuff. I also drilled a hole through the bottom of the keel, roughly amidships, and fastened a threaded nut inside the hull over it prior to fitting the decks. This will take a bolt from the base to fasten the model down to it. I don't know how other people secure their models to the display bases so I just improvised with what I had on hand. The head grating in the bow has been noted by others to be a problem with this kit. It has no supporting structure to it and seems to be just floating there. I do not know how this would have looked with respect to ornamentations and design, so I have not decided what to do with this area yet. [/size] The decks went in easily. The kit has a series of stanchions along the centerline of the first battery deck to support the 2nd battery deck. There are none for between the 2nd and 3rd battery. As a result there is a lot of flex in the 3rd battery deck. Since there will be quite a bit of rigging fastened here that will produce an upward strain on the deck I added some extra support. I trimmed some sprue to length to make stanchions for the centerline to hold the deck up. And I added a boot (coat?) to the base of the mainmast to hold the deck down. The mast coat was fashioned from sheet styrene and quarter round molding. The masts are dry fit at this point. I do not think I will cement them to the step. I'm going to let the rigging hold them in. I added some shims beneath the hatch gratings to raise the gratings above the deck level to give the appearance of a coaming. All of the eyebolts for the decks were replaced with brass. .
  7. This build log will cover my building of the 1:72 Revell plastic kit of the Gato class submarine. The decals that come with the kit are for the USS Drum and USS Albacore. However, the fairwater, or conning tower, does not match either boat. But it does match that of the USS Cobia, which is what I will model here. Besides the kit itself which is 52 inches in length when completed, I have also purchased the complete "Big Ed" set of brass photo-etched parts for this kit from Eduard. Where I will display it I haven't decided yet, but it will be on the work bench for quite some time. Painting will mostly be done by airbrush, which I am quite the novice at using. But it should be fun to build. While not needing the skills to build like the wooden kits, I wanted to add this particular model to the log entries due mostly to the size of the model itself. (From Wikipedia:) The United States Navy Gato-class submarines were launched 1941–43 and were the first mass-production US submarine class of World War II. Together with their near-sisters the Balao and Tench classes, their design formed the majority of the United States Navy's World War II submarine fleet. Named after the first vessel of the class, USS Gato, the Gato class and its successors formed the core of the submarine service that was largely responsible for the destruction of the Japanese merchant marine and a large portion of the Imperial Japanese Navy in World War II. Gato's name comes from a species of small catshark. Like most other U.S. Navy submarines of the period, boats of the Gato class were given the names of marine creatures. USS Cobia (SS/AGSS-245) is a Gato-class submarine, formerly of the United States Navy, named for the cobia. Cobia (SS-245) was laid down on 17 March 1943 by Manitowoc Shipbuilding Company, Manitowoc, Wisconsin. She was launched on 28 November 1943 (sponsored by Mrs. C. W. Magruder), and commissioned on 29 March 1944, Lieutenant Commander Albert L. Becker in command. On 1 July 1970, the Navy struck Cobia from the Naval Register, and she was towed to Manitowoc, Wisconsin to serve as an international memorial to submariners. In 1986, Cobia was incorporated as a part of the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, declared a National Historic Landmark, and placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Cobia is permanently docked at the Manitowoc River's mouth at Lake Michigan.
  8. Part 01 This is a build of the Skipjack Carrie Price using the Pyro Chesapeake Skipjack Oyster Boat model kit. After some research I found out that the Lindberg/Pyro kit is a model of the Carrie Price as recorded by Howard Chapelle. After I started the kit I found the name cast on the transom, but had not noticed it before I started my research. The Carrie Price is one of the projects in “American Ship Models and How to Build Them” by V. R. Grimwood and Howard I. Chapelle. I am using the plans in this book to build and update this kit. I am planning to depict her as build around 1895. I’m not going to make this a museum quality model, but will do my best to make it a good one. According to the Chapelle drawings the model comes as close as I could measure to 1/64th scale, the same as the book drawings. This will be somewhat of a slow build, as I am also working to expand my shed/shop, and the finished section is a mess, with “stuff” from the unfinished portion (enclosed, but no insulation, electric, etc.) piled into the finished area and my work area. Also I decided to do this build log after I had partially assembled the hull, so I will have to describe some of what I have done so far, without the benefit of before and after photos, in the first parts. I also have the help of cats in writing this build, so have to take frequent “Look, I want attention, so I’m sitting/walking/sleeping on your keyboard.” breaks. This is my first model in quite some time and my first build log ever, so please bear with me, if you decide to follow this along with me. I do not know all the correct names for all the various parts of the boat, but will do my best. Modeling suggestions and corrections to the names I use for the parts welcome! I will be using information in the Grimwood book, information I found on line, the drawings for the Willie Bennett by Model Shipways, and the book “Model Boat Building: The Skipjack” by Steve Rogers. Box Cover Art The kit is fairly close to what is shown in the drawings, but does have several problems. Here is a list of those I have found so far: Minor, but paint scheme shown on box wrong. The Chesapeake Boatmen were superstitious about painting blue on their boats, the exception being blue in the field of the American flag, or bunting. This was generally used only on the trailboard decoration. Also the decks were painted white, not left natural. Red copper paint was also the standard at the time for the anti-fouling paint. The cabin tops were generally green or a slate gray, from my research, still looking into this. The trailboards below the bowsprit were ornate, the kit has nothing decal or otherwise for them. I have no information on what the Carrie Price’s trailboards looked like, so I will use a modification of those detailed in the Willie Bennett kit. The Bennett trailboards have features that are common on examples I found of other trailboards. (besides I already redrew the Bennett’s trailboards for my own use). Additionally the drawings indicate a bird figurehead at the end of the trailboards. The Bennett has such a figurehead. I will use the same graphic as on the Bennett drawing on the end of these trailboards. I plan to print one on the end of the trailboard graphic, and then shape the profile of the stem to match. I will not try to crave a 3D figurehead. Trailboard Ida May Trailboard for Caleb W. Jones. Note the stem brace that is similar to the Carrie Prices. Trailboard of the Nathan Dorchester Port trailboard graphic I will be using for the Carrie Price. It will be about 2 inches long on the model. Here is a roughly cut print of the port trailboard placed on the model to see what it would look like. The print is cut too thin at the fore end to fit between the soon to be removed detail. Note also the original railing and knightheads. I have just started to remove the stem detailing at this point. The numbering for the points below should have started with 4,5, etc. but somehow was reset when I copied the text to this post, and I can't seem to change it. Please bear with me as I learn. As an interesting side note, if you look at the pictures of the Jones and Dorchester, the bowsprit does not rest on the stem much past the hull, on these two. I’ll have to look closer at the Bennett plans and the Rogers book. There are some major fit problems in the pieces, nothing that can’t be fixed with some putty, but they must be corrected for a good looking finished model. See the stem keel joint in the cover art picture. There is no oyster dredging equipment included in the model. This is actually a bonus for me, as she was built before the use of power dredging winches, and thus the deck casting has no marks where the winch parts might be attached. The down side is that I will have to build 2 hand powered winches, for which I have found some photos/drawings, but none with dimensions. The stem in the trailboard/rail/ bowsprit area is incorrect. I’ll explain when I get to that section. See the heavy detailing on the box top The railings in the bow and stern do not extend far enough. Rope coil castings in the deadeye and stern railing areas are terrible and incorrect, I will remove them. The mast is a little crude, but most importantly badly warped. I will have to make a new one. The boom is also warped, but I may be able to use it with modification. The casting is fairly straight side to side, but curved vertically fore and aft. The long booms on the real boats sagged, but my boom is curved up rather than down! I have not decided whether to make a new one (with or without sag), or remove the sail attachment detail from the top of the boom, invert it and remake that detail. I’m leaning toward making a new one, with detailing that matches the proportions of the ones on the mast I will have to make. The furled sails are just wrong! The jib is not too bad, in real life it would have been furled tighter, but this could pass. The main sail on the other hand angles in the opposite direction from the mast rake! The main sail is attached to the mast via mast hoops and thus the leading edge should always be close to the mast, it can’t pull away as shown in the model. I’ll make new sails, I have not decided whether furled or set. I can use the plans from my Willie Bennett kit for rigging, and sail construction. On the prototype skipjacks the bowsprit has made with a downward curved hog or bow. This was cut into the shape of the bowsprit, it was not steamed in from a straight spar. On the model the bowsprit is a straight spare. Also, as is not atypical on plastic models, the fittings on this, the mast, and the boom are cast quite massively. The model part also has no round to octagonal to square transition area, as shown in the plans. The model overall though is accurate in dimension and overall shape, a good starting point. As a note: The kit includes two ship’s boats, this is correct. The large boxes in interior are also correct. They are engine covers. Maryland law dictates that the skipjack itself may not have an engine, sail driven only. This is a measure to limit oyster harvesting in hopes of preventing overfishing. The auxiliary though is allowed an engine. If the wind is insufficient for dredging the boat, oddly enough called a “Push Boat” is lowered and used to push the skipjack. If the wind is good, the boat is not used. The second boat provided is the one used to get from the shore/dock, to a moored skipjack. The engines on the auxiliaries were generally automobile or similarly sized motors. Push Boat drawing from Nation Archives. Note the lack of a rudder. The Push Boat direction is controlled by steering lines (see below). Push Boat in operation. Note the rigging for controlling the direction of thrust, from Nation Archives. Push Boat “Thrust Pad” on the E. C. Collier, from Nation Archives I will show some small sections of the plans to illustrate where I will be making some of the modifications. Other than the hull/railing details above , most will be in the rigging area, so I will just show photos of my progress for that.
  9. My third build will be the SMS Emden. It has a history for us Aussies I suppose. I won't go into the history as there is the whole of the internet for that. Revell brought out a twin kit recently which will be good if I stuff up something, as I don't intend on building both it and the Dresden. There are a lot of open source builds on the net for this kit, most of which seem to be strait out of the box. I managed to purchase the last set of draughts in 1/200 on the internet for Peter Huff's 1995 publication. I had a look at the Kagero book and yet again, their research leaves a bit to be desired, as the even the photos don't match. The kit will need a LOT of bashing. Thus more internet shopping for bits and pieces. Heaps of work, but that's the joy of it. I got the Eduard Emden photo etch set for a start. A lot of the sprues look like they have been put in an oven as they just look blurry with very little detail. There will be very little of the original kit used but the hull is nice. I'm thinking six or more months, given my Varyag has a lot more detail but also a lot more commercially available extras. This era is not well represented for after market.
  10. USS Constitution by Overworked724 - Revell - Plastic - 1/196
  11. Hi everybody! I have been looking for La Belle Poule from Heller in scale 1/200. This ship has been out of production for a while and is becoming very rare. There have been some for sale on a french website for a very good price (20-30 EUR) but the problem was that the seller was either not willing to ship it to Belgium or the item was already sold. So, my question for you, do any of you happen to have this kit or know anybody that wants to get it of their hands for a good price? There are some models out there but I'm not prepared to pay €60 for a kit in that scale from the seventies... I can get a "Le superbe" or "Glorieux" kit for that kind of money with twice the amount of parts and in a bigger scale. So please, any tips are very welcome! Thank you Grtz, Lukas.
  12. Hello everyone! I have been stalking this site for a while now (when one looks at every post every day you can begin to call it stalking I guess) and I actually fell in love with sailingships, especially naval vessels from mid 18th to late 18th century. I'm currently building (as the title of this topic already says it:) Le superbe from heller. The instructions are pretty unclear and in french so for my first ship of this kind, that's quite a setback. But nothing is forlorn! My deepest grattitude is extended to Blue Ensign for letting me base my model on his Le Praetorian. When I'm stuck with my model I spy a little bit off his buildlog since there are no buildlogs of this ship that has that level of detail and extensiveness. So more about the build itself. I started the build in march 2013, almost a year further and not that much progression, because of a very big learning curve to overcome. I take my time to do and redo things when necessary. And a building break of 5 months also has something to do with it. Too much schoolwork and so on. I have added some detail to the longboat because I don't like the look of an empty boat, and the setting of the shipsboats doesn't satisfy me. Other boats will be built later on to be incorporated in a diorama. I will try to add as much detail to the cannons as possible, which in this scale is pretty hard. I painted the cannons flat black but I also overdrawn them with pencil to add a metallic look. At the moment only the 30 32pndrs are painted and eyeletes have been attached to the trucks. As you will notice in my pictures, the ship is seaworthy, at least it can float like a real ship. I also built my previous models, Bismarck and Prinz Eugen this way, because it adds some realism. Nothing worse like a ship on dry land in my opinion... But with models it's harder said than done of course. The foremast is a bit warped but this is already fixed. I am planning to pick up the build again starting from june, because school will be over and I have a whole summerholiday to get some work done. I know that I will never reach the quality and finesse all the models on this forum have but I am passionate about it and my goal is to make a ship that I like/love and will be proud of. My deepest respect for all you experienced shipbuilders on this forum, wood and plastic. Every time I look at a build I am symply awe-struck! Enjoy and any comment/help is welcome! greetings.
  13. For my first build, I thought I would start with a plastic kit and see how it goes from here. After a couple trips to my local hobby shop I purchased an 896-piece model called Pirate Ship. 896 parts may seem a bit ambitious, but I wanted a fair amount of detail. Perhaps a bit of back-story is in order. My basement's decor is loosely based on the period of Age of Sails. It started with my wife's and I love of the sea, but being landlocked, we thought we'd bring a small window of the sea into the home. A 180-gallon salt-water aquarium was set-up in the basement and we were well on our way. From there it seemed only natural to go with a nautical theme. I also enjoy woodworking and built an aquarium tank stand with two mermaids holding up a portion of the stand. From there an interest in historical accounts of pirates evolved, which lead to the purchase of the Revell Kit. Here is a photo of the boxed kit, as I am still working up the nerve to opening it. What's a ship without a crew?
  14. I started my Revel 1/96 Constitution when my youngest was 4. It was slow going and I used to joke that I'll have it done in time to give it to her as a wedding present. I eventually just put it away as it was a little overwhelming. Well she's 23, and while she doesn't have a serious boyfriend, I'd like to fulfill my committment when the time comes. So it's unpacked and I'm sitting here and I'm stuck exactly where I was before. Except now there's the Internet. :-) So in brief, I can't figure out how to get the string through the tiny cannon door holes. Do you just drill very carefully? Use a hot needle? Something else? I'm sure there's some technique. Any ideas are gladly accepted! Thanks!
  15. Several members over the last few months have inquired about some fiber optic lanterns I incorporated in my U.S.S. Constitution build and how to make them. Although some trial and error will occur for you (as with any new applied technique) I will highlight some of the details of the process I used to hopefully allow you to avoid some pitfalls. Let me start with tools you will need. Although this lantern process may seem tedious it is actually a lot of fun working with them and the rewards of lighting previously unseen areas of your build can't be beat. They do get easier as you do more of them. The tools I used are as follows: 1. Calipers (used to gauge the size of the plastic while it is being turned and shaped) These are EKG calipers that were given to me long ago. 2. Double end pin vise from Micromark tools: http://www.micromark.com/double-end-pin-vise,6729.html item #21104. I took mine apart and only used the large chuck (beneath the hand grip in the photo) to secure the plastic stock. 3. A slightly curved and cut paint stirring stick with blue painters tape applied. This is used to clamp the fiber optic into the ships bulwark and protects the model from the bite of the clamp. I added felt (not pictured) between the clamp as well for the same reason. 4. A plastic jig made from extra 1/8" plastic stock. More on this later... 5. Fine modelers sanding stick (or simply spray glue fine sand paper to another paint stick). 6. Micro brush - I believe this is a Microbrush product (http://www.microbrush.com/hobby/howtobuy/area.asp). 7. 1/8" Square clear plastic stock. This one is acrylic. I got mine from US Plastics item 44135 (http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=24195&catid=440&clickid=searchresults) BUT they only come in 6 foot sections! Shipping was more than the product...but there was plenty of it to experiment. Pictured is a 16" section. 8. Miniature drill bits. Any will do...mine are Micromark (http://www.micromark.com/20-piece-micro-size-drill-bit-set-with-index-61-80,6758.html) 9. 3" or 4" grip clamp to compress the fiber optic into the bulwark. 10. Leather punch for cutting out lantern reflectors. 11. Medium file with sharp fine teeth. Dull files will increase friction and thus heat, melting your stock. 12. An accurate ruler for setting the calipers. 13. A hand mini drill (Mine: Micromark http://www.micromark.com/micro-hand-drill,7045.html) NOT pictured: 14. Drill Press 15. Fiber OPtic cable (I bought plastic cable on Ebay - 0.75mm) 16. Dremel tool with a 1/32" engraving bit. 17. Beader's snips or tree snips. 18. Emory board 19. Flat Black Paint Next I'll describe how I used them.
  16. Hello again. I started this log back on November 1, 2011, and I think I've managed to salvage most of it. I have all the photos, and will re-build the log as best I can. Having been through catastrophic data losses before (professionally), I know the feeling the moderators must have and completely sympathize. Re-boots and recovery are always difficult, but the "can-do" attitude of everyone here and the overwhelming friendly atmosphere obviously hasn't been lost. For that, I am thankful. Here's the last photo I took (some progress made since then, but not photographed). I will start the log from the beginning when I have more time. Andy.
  17. This model has a very questionable pedigree. While visually based on the R.C. Anderson design, it really has detail and design more in common with the old Megow wooden kit from the 1930's-40's. This is my attempt to make it more like the Anderson version, which still exists at the Addison Gallery of the Phillip's Academy. It is also another step as I try to rehabilitate and rebuild my skills as a model builder. To start, I needed to find a scale for the model. Like so many of the plastic sailing ship kits from the 1960's, it has no real stated scale (indeed, the box art even depicts another version of the Mayflower!). Based upon Anderson's stated dimensions in "A Mayflower Model" (Mariner's Mirror, vol. 12, 1926), 64' keel, 26' beam, a scale of approximately 1/250 was determined. Construction began in earnest on 24th October, 2015. Initial construction consisted of making "timbers" from sheet styrene (an old garage sale sign). The two gunports were blanked as well.
  18. I needed a change of scenery after a 10 year build on my Endeavour. I couldn't face another long term challange. Months ago I found the Artwox Varyag on the net on an overseas site and liked it a lot, but shipping to Oz is usually a nightmare. I found the kit at BNA Models at a reasonable price and thought that itn would be a nice change as I have not done a plastic model this century. I suppose the advantage of a late 1800's early 1900's kit has the advantage of real photos. Also the aftermarket range of goodies for plastic kits is great, as plastic is a lot more unforgiving than wood. The Artwox kit only has the original Zvesda hull, with their own false deck, wooden deck, resin, photoetch and barrels. The instructions are fairly good but without other references I would be lost. After having done a tall ship model, I now know how important the rigging plans are (the kit has none) and I have orderd the Kagero book. There are some things missing from the Artwox photoetch fret which are included in the Eduard kit and vice versa, so I also got that.
  19. Here is a new build, the Bismarck. All I can say is that this is one kit that needs photo etch as there is very little detail. I would expect more from Tamiya. Anyway here are shots of the sprues
  20. Having just completed a re-indexing of my Build Log photo archive (970 plus and growing) I am now going to begin the process of re-posting *most* of those photos onto the new/old Build Log. Some of the photos will likely be out of sequence early on but hopefully it won't be that badly mixed up. And I am going to try and 'remember' as much of what was going on at the time as possible, though strictly speaking so much went on that I don't expect to remember most of the specific details. Having said that -- Let's roll! On October 01, 2009, a co-worker rescued a dismasted model ship that was being thrown out in the garbage. He offered it to me innocently, not knowing that by doing so he was about to send me on a trip across the waters of unknown territory filled with information, frustration, obsession, distraction and hundreds upon hundreds of hours of work. During my voyage I have dredged up past experience and mixed it well with the new skills I have picked up. And eleven months or so into that voyage I finally made the dive from lurker to member of MSW. So these first rounds of photos involve the time Before MSW - when the Transition occurs I will make note of it. But to start - here's the start of it. From my current perspective I still wonder what the heck I was thinking when I brought it home, lol. The original caption for this photo was, "Now here's my plan ..."
  21. Having completed my first model ship (Airfix's HMS Victory) in 2013 I was eager to build a second, 74 gun ship as they were the mainstay of the Royal Navy. However it soon became apparent that none are available in the form of a plastic kit. But, after a bit of digging around i discovered that Heller do two versions of the French 74 gun ship, quite a few of which were captured in battle and re-commissioned into the Royal Navy. This meant i could build a British 74, but i would have to do quite a bit of kit bashing. Now all i had to do was decide what ship to base my model on. THE SHIP Launched at Rochefort on 29 April 1794 Lion was a 74-gun, third rate ship of the line -a member of the Téméraire class designed for the French Navy by Jacques-Noël Sané. In May 1795 the ship was renamed Formidable. Captained by Charles Alexandre Linois Formidable sailed as part of the fleet commanded by Admiral Villaret Joyeuse that fought against the British at the Battle of Groix on 3 June 1795. During the battle Formidable came under the sustained fire of two British ships. Her hull, masts, sails and rigging were badly cut up and a fire soon broke out on her poop. When her mizen mast fell over the side Linois finally hauled down his colours. Over 320 of his crew of 700 had either been killed or wounded in the action. Linois had lost an eye and all his lieutenants had been injured. The ship was taken to Portsmouth where Linois was exchanged. The Royal Navy already had a 90 gun second rate named Formidable and as it was mistakenly believed that the ship had been captured off Belle Ile, rather than the Ile de Groix, she was renamed Belleisle. In August 1798 Belleisle began fitting out at Portsmouth. Her hull was strengthened and much of her internal layout was altered to suit British tastes. The refit took fourteen months and cost £35842.0.0d (roughly two million pounds in todays money) In February 1803 she sailed for the Mediterranean, joining a fleet that would soon fall under the command of Admiral Horatio Nelson. Captained by William Hargood, (her longest serving captain) she was the second ship in the British lee column at Trafalgar, sailing into battle astern of Collingwood’s flag-ship Royal Sovereign. She soon lost all her masts, her bowsprit, her anchors, even her figurehead in her bruising encounter with Fougueux and eight other ships of the combined fleet. The only place left to raise her ensign was at the end of a pike which she managed to keep flying until the ships following behind her in the British line finally came to her rescue. By the end of the battle thirty-three of her people had been killed and a further ninety-four injured. The next day the battered British ships and their French and Spanish prizes were hit by a terrifying storm which did not let go for four whole days. Sails were shredded, fragile masts brought crashing down. When the storm hit Belleisle was under the tow of the frigate Naiad. The tow had broken and as desperate attempts were made to reconnect the line in the heaving swells the two ships crashed into one another, staving in Naiad’s stern. Moments later Naiad’s topsail ripped apart in the howling wind and had to be hacked free; then she lost one of her staysails. By the time Naiad’s sails had been sorted out Belleisle had disappeared from view in the heaving seas and driving rain. Left to fend for themselves Hargood now attempted to take his ship around Cape Trafalgar and into the Straits of Gibraltar under a hastily lashed together jury rig. Around midnight Hargood summoned his officers and told them the ship was about to be wrecked and that they should prepare for the worst. Belleisle’s people, cold and exhausted, waited through the night for the end, but thankfully it never came. By the next morning, using the smallest scrap of sail, they had managed to turn the ship away from the dangerous shore. Naiad returned and as the wind eased was finally able to get a line across to Belleisle and tow her into Gibraltar. Belleisle returned to Portsmouth for a refit which took four months and cost £16384.0.0d. In September 1806 she took part in the capture and destruction of a crippled French 74, Impetueux. After almost four years in command Hargood left the ship a year later. Belleisle was present at the capture of Martinique in January 1809 and later that year she took part in expeditions to the Scheldt and Walcheren. She was finally laid up in ordinary in September 1809. In July 1814 she began a large repair at Portsmouth but a month later the decision was taken to have her broken up instead. THE KIT Copyright Heller The donor kit for this conversion will be Heller’s Le Superbe (80895), a Téméraire class 74 launched in 1784 but wrecked in a storm eleven years later. Here are some sprue shots. These white sprues are the fixtures and fittings for Superbe. Heller's other 74, Glorieux, has a different set of sprues The sprues on the right are for the long guns and carriages. There are five of each provided in the kit The kit also comes with three sheets of vacuformed sails, a chain for the rudder and a rigging machine. No rigging thread though (any provided with the kit would probably have needed replacing anyway.) The instructions are all in French but a page of translations is provided. Parts are both numbered and given a description i.e. 77 bowsprit cap THE BUILD I started things off by sanding down the hull and decks which all have a quite pronounced wood grain effect. I then attached the parts containing the hawse holes to the hull, filling and sanding the gap. As you can see the copper plates continue up to the lower wale rather than finishing at the waterline. This will need to be sorted out. Another area requiring attention are the rather poorly moulded gratings. These need tackling anyway as British and French 74's had different deck layouts.
  22. Scratchbuilding USS Saratoga CV-3, 1944 in 1/350 scale. This model will depict Saratoga late war with asymmetrical hull, cut-down funnel, and heavy AA fit. It is NOT being converted from the Trumpeter kit. Jim Russell did convert the Trumpeter kit into a 1944 Saratoga beautifully. You can see his conversion here: http://www.shipmodels.info/mws_forum/viewtopic.php?f=59&t=39515&start=0 Actual ship length overall: 910' - 1-3/4" Model Length: 31.205 inches (79.26 cm). Material: Evergreen polystyrene sheet, strips, tubing, rods, H-sections, etc. Hull construction method: double plank on frame Plans and References: 1. US Navy Booklet of General Plans dated 1942 (implemented following Kamikaze damage sustained on February 21, 1945), available from Floating Drydock 2. US Navy Booklet of General Plans dated April 23, 1936 (implemented during a refit in December, 1943, plans updated Aug., 1944 to include cross sections - vitally important for this build). 3. US Navy Booklet of General Plans for USS Lexington CV-2, dated 1936, for comparison 4. detail photos and comments posted by Tracy White (invaluable) 5. photos from USS Saratoga Squadron at Sea by David Doyle (Tracy contributed much to that effort). 6. hull sections for USS Lexington CV-2, drawn by Thomas Walkowiak, available from Floating Drydock. Technique inspiration: Paul Budzik's masterful scratch-built USS Enterprise CV-6 http://paulbudzik.com/current-projects/Enterprise%20Scratch/Enterprise_Scratch.html Finish inspiration: Martin Quinn’s exquisite prewar USS Lexington CV-2: http://www.modelshipgallery.com/gallery/cv/cv-02/350-mq/mq-index.html Your advice, constructive criticism and comments are most welcome and appreciated.
  23. OK here we go... 3 January, 2015. Thus begins my build log of Revell's 1:96 scale USS Constitution. I selected an older kit release because a lot of things I've read indicate that they have much higher molding quality over the newer kits. Mine has a box date of 1974 and it has a US Bicentennial logo, so I believe that it was produced between 1974 and 1976. I plan on "kinda" building her as she appeared under Isaac Hull's command. I say "kinda" because I'm not going into every particle of minutiae involved with how she really was configured. I'm just taking care of the obvious such as eliminating the forward gunport (bridle port) and the skylight above the Captain's cabin. Other than that this will pretty much be an out-of-box build. Feel free to follow along!
  24. Hello: My name is Luis and I live in Mexico City. I have always admired the ships from the napoleonic era. I have built scale models for quite a few years now, both scratch and from kits, but this is the first time I post a building log. This ship is the spaniard 80 gunner "Neptuno". Built in 1795 in El Ferrol shipyards, in Spain, she fought at Trafalgar under Captain Cayetano Valdez's command. Taken by the British after a four hour combat, she was recaptured by the Spanish crew but was beached and lost during the storm that followed the battle. The model will be completely stratch-built, out of styrene, cardboard, basswood and balsa wood. Cutting out the paper templates for the frames. Designs for transom and stern gallery False keel. The material is styrene False keel, keel and rudder Stem Frames, starting from stern Quarterdeck
  25. Hello everyone, sorry for my bad english today and got my first kit ever, I am new to modeling, could you give me some advice, especially for painting? as soon as possible'll post pictures of the kit just arrived, and will update every time the post, with the progress made in the construction thank you all in advance