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  1. Hello to you all fellow builders, As you know , Mobbsie has ordered the HMS Agamemnon for me and finally she is in dry dock in Schiedam. I will not start on her . I have first finish the Le Mirage. But when you have a new kit in the house , you want to show it. That's the reason why I open a build log…... First of course a little history lesson and later on the pictures of all the stuff that is in the box. When I start on her I know I need a lot of help and advise from all of you. I have a few great examples of other Aggy's and I know that Mobbsie will be there for me if needed. So let the lesson begins and hopefully it will not take to long when I can start building her. Caldercraft HMS Agamemnon 1781 1:64 HMS Agamemnon 1781 64 Gun 3rd Rate Ship of the Line 1:64 Scale. The Agamemnon was one of seven ships built to the same design, drawn by the same naval architect that designed the famous Victory, Sir Thomas Slade. Agamemnon was the third to be built in the class, the first two being Ardent in 1762 and Raisonnable, laid down in 1763. Third was Agamemnon, followed by Belliqueux in 1778, Stately in 1779, Indefatigable in 1781 and finally the Nassau in 1783. A Third Rate ship of the line like Agamemnon was an expensive warship to build. The construction of the ship’s hull with yards and masts fitted cost the Admiralty £20,579 (in today’s terms, approximately £12 million), a figure that did not include ordnance, sails, hemp, copper plating and other hardware. For three of the most crucial decades in British naval history, Agamemnon always seemed to be at the centre of the action, having no less than eleven battle honours. Agamemnon’s maiden voyage was on 9th July 1781 under the command of Captain Caldwell. Her first engagement was at the battle of Ushant on 12th December 1781 where the British fleet under Rear Admiral Kempenfelt defeated the French fleet and captured a significant number of ships, including the convoy the French were escorting. Agamemnon’s next major engagement was at the Battle of The Saints on 12th April 1782 where Rodney and Lord Hood’s fleet defeated Comte de Grasse’s French fleet. On 7th January 1793, Nelson learned from Lord Hood that he had been chosen to command his first ship of the line, the Agamemnon. Although initially disappointed that he had not been given command of a 74, Nelson soon grew fond of Agamemnon. Nelson wrote to his wife, Fanny. She was, he said, "Without exception one of the finest ships in the fleet, with the character of sailing most remarkably well". He also wrote after twelve days in a storm in the Mediterranean in "Gales and lumping seas but in Agamemnon we mind them not; she is the finest ship I ever sailed in, and were she a 74, nothing should induce me to leave her while the war lasts". Even a French Commander Admiral Alemand expressed the view that Agamemnon was one of the fastest ships in the British Navy. That, coupled with Nelson’s inspirational command made her a very potent fighting unit. Nelson commanded Agamemnon, or "eggs and bacon" as her crew affectionately called her, until 10th June 1796. In that time Nelson had proved to be a great Commander, tactically and physically. It was during his command of Agamemnon that Nelson lost the sight of his right eye. When at the Siege of Calvi in 1794 during the morning of 10th July, Nelson was hit in the face and chest by splinters, stones and sand that were thrown up by an enemy shell that hit a battlement during a shore action. On 13th June 1796, Nelson’s broad pennant was transferred to the 74 gun Captain at anchor in San-Fiorenza bay. He watched the worn out Agamemnon sail to England for a much-needed refit. She was refitted from the bottom up at Chatham. When re-commissioned in 1797 she was ordered to join Admiral Duncan’s squadron off Yarmouth, which was keeping watch on the coast of Holland. She was immediately caught up in the naval mutinies of that year. Agamemnon was however considered untrustworthy by Richard Parker the leader of the Nore mutineers and had the guns of the mutinous ships trained on her to ensure she did not ‘blackleg’. Subsequently in the proceedings that followed all thirteen of Agamemnon’s crew who were tried were pardoned. Agamemnon’s next major fleet engagement was the battle of Copenhagen on the 21st April 1801. Unfortunately she was grounded on a shoal for most of the action, but Nelson won the battle and a truce with Denmark was negotiated. On the 21st October 1805 Agamemnon took part in the battle of Trafalgar. When Nelsons favorite ship hove in sight a week before, with Nelsons old friend Sir Edward Berry in command of the Agamemnon, Nelson was delighted "Here comes that damned fool Berry! Now we shall have a battle." At Trafalgar the 27 British ships of the line defeated the Franco Spanish fleet of 33 line of battle ships in a victory that ensured British supremacy of the sea for the next 100 years. Later in Agamemnon’s career, she served in the West Indies, taking part in the battle of Santo Domingo, and then in South American waters. Agamemnon was wrecked in Maldonado Bay off the coast of Uruguay on the 16th June 1809. Divers have recently discovered the remains of HMS Agamemnon on the bottom of Maldonado Bay, after a six-year search by marine archaeologists. Strewn around the site are hundreds of copper plate, as well as a 24 pounder cannon, parts of the pumping devices as well as a significant amount of shot, bolts and copper nails. Also discovered was a silver pocket seal, complete with fob chain. On its face of translucent stone it bore a star shaped emblem with the name ‘Nelson’ in mirror image incised in a curve above. Agamemnon was laid down at Bucklers Hard in May 1777 and launched on the 10th April 1781. Her dimensions were as follows; Gun deck - 160 feet 2 inches Keel- 131 feet 10 1/4 inches Beam - 44 feet 5 inches Tonnage - 1384 tons Guns; Twenty-six, twenty-four pounder - Gun deck. Twenty-six, eighteen pounder - Upper deck. Twelve, nine pounder - Quarterdeck. Complement - 491 officers and ratings. The Caldercraft Agamemnon kit features: Double plank on bulkhead construction, Keel and bulkheads are CNC cut in Birch ply as are all the major constructional parts. Extensive use of CNC cut Walnut has been employed for the majority of visible structures and fittings. The wood strip pack contains Lime wood for the first planking, Walnut for the second planking and Tanganyka for the decks. Ramin dowel is supplied for the masts and yards. Walnut and etched brass stern gallery windows, with the remaining tafrail decoration in finely cast white metal. Scale brass cannon barrels with walnut carriages. Rigging thread is supplied in natural and black to rig the model as depicted in the photographs. Beechwood deck gratings and Walnut Blocks and deadeyes. Shroud cleats, trucks, stunsail yard brackets as well as CNC cut Walnut tops, crosstrees, trestle trees, mast caps and a wealth of unique detail parts. Copper plates are provided to sheath the hull bottom. Fully detailed full size plans and a comprehensive construction manual. Specifications: Scale: 1:64 Length: 1300mm Width: 490mm Height 945mm Planking: Double
  2. As I'm slowly approaching the end (or at least the beginning of the end) on HMS Snake, I gratefully received what will be my next installment for my birthday. Don't expect much progress as I want to keep working on HMS Snake as time permits, but I wanted to have the kit in my hands so I can start to do some planning ahead, and most importantly, get my order in for some upgraded wood. I also want to take advantage of the warm weather to get the larger sanding jobs done outside if I can. I plan to take the first planking slowly to avoid repeating errors and to hopefully ensure I can get the lines as close as possible to the plans. I had a great experience with my Caldercraft Snake, and after trying to evaluate other kits out there, decided to stay in the family due to the expected kit quality, interest in the subject matter and availability of aftermarket items. I've been vacillating between HMS Agamemnon and HMS Diana for some time, but what finally swayed me was getting a copy of the AOTS Diana book which I'd like to follow as closely as possible as skills permit. Initial thoughts on the kit and approach: I'm going to build her as HMS Jason, the 5th of the 9 built Artois-class frigates. Don't think this will mean any significant deviations, but I have downloaded the plans from NMM, and there is of course the narcissistic additional interest for me . This will require me to change the figurehead, I have thought through options. While not quite a beautiful as the Diana admiralty models with open quarterdeck rails, I do plan to build her as she was when completed with the build up quarterdeck bulwarks. My reading indicates that most, if not all, would have had this feature when actually launched as it was back in fashion. Wood - The supplied walnut does not look great, not a surprise and this seems to be a (sadly) common factor in CC kits. I have decided to upgrade/change the wood, and will probably go with boxwood for the external hull, and maple for the deck as I'll try to replicate the decking in the AOTS book which Ray so successfully handled on his build. I'll keep the walnut below the waterline where possible to save on cost as this will be coppered . Instructions - Poor, but as expected. I hope this won't present too many challenges, and hope my initial experience on Snake will get me through OK. Copper plates - The CC plates get a bad rap, and I don't think they are as bad as commonly perceived when looking at a completed hull. That being said, I would like to try to replace them with Amati ones which look very authentic if finances allow (on a "cost per year" basis, this is easier to justify given my slow pace) Armament - The HMS Jason plans show her with 6 identical ports on her quarterdeck, suggesting the original 9lb'er configuration. The kit provides a mix between carronades and cannons with differences in the gun port configuration and size. I may change this but we'll see. Quality - Overall, I do like the quality of the kit, CC do provide some high quality parts that are correct scale. Where I know the kit provided items will not be up to it, I'll replace/upgrade those (pumps, blocks, rigging line etc). The keel and bulkheads are very solid. I have plenty more thoughts, but will keep those to myself for now. Onwards and upwards! The box, manuals and part identification Frames and pre-cut parts The wood strips Photo-etch All of the really small bits still in box until inventoried
  3. Hello all Now is the time to start my second build log since I have finished the Americas Cup Endeavour. I am more interested in warships of the age of sails so it feels natural to build Sherbourne as a second kit. The ship is not so big but still has all features of a period ship. The main purpose of this build is to learn as many skills as possible so I can not tell how the finished model will look like. I will scratch and replace many parts in the kit just to learn how to do it. The model will be of darker but better walnut than supplied in the kit. I bought it in a local hobby shop here in Helsingborg and I think it is Amati's replacement wood. As sources for the build I will use AOTS Alert, Rigging period for and after craft and other books that I find fits. I will also pick ideas from Chucks cutter Cheerful and of course from the very nice Sherbournes by Gregor, Dirk, Tony and Kester. I hope you don't mind I follow some of your ideas . Ps, Some of the pictures are to small. You will see the full photos if you click (open) on them.
  4. [This is a rebuild of my original posts] Here is the start of my build log. Have not done anything like this before so please bear with me. Sometimes I have too much verbiage – what do I mean sometimes! A short deviation: Back in ’83, no not 1883, I flew over the pond to visit the Victory as I had just finished a model of her. I brought a piece of the Victory back here to Canada (given to me) and decided that someday I would build another and put that real piece of the Victory into the next model. That time came last October/November 2009, (can it really be twenty-seven years). I started to look at my photos from ’83. Don’t know what possessed me to start but start I did. After looking at my photos and digging out the slides and prints, I ended up scanning about 45 images that I had taken that wet soggy rainy day in October. I know most of you remember we didn't have digital cameras back then. (Do you think the young ones these days could survive without their instant digital images and have to wait a week or two for the pictures to get back after we mailed them to Kodak for processing?) Those pictures I took just weren't enough. And I don’t feel like booking a flight to London these days. So, how could I build a much better Victory with more real reference pictures of her in Portsmouth? The first challenge was more images and books. The internet is here now, I remember when it wasn't! It took a while to figure out what kit to purchase but time and time again from MSW members and other forum sites this Caldercraft kit appears to be one of the best manufactured. I must admit the 1:64 model of Victory with complete details would have been my purchase if it was on the market from Chris Watton and Amati. I really wanted to do all the decks and will be fiddling the Jotika interior with some smoke and mirrors that I hope will work. My quest for new knowledge of course started with the internet. I am amazed at how much info is buried in those bits and bytes throughout the world. Why wasn't this around when I built my first Victory? My internet surfing shows me there is lots of data on the Jotika / Caldercraft Victory and there are many builds of the Jotika kit with extensive photos etc. What is packed in the box and the contents is well documented. I see no advantage to repeating those excellent reviews. As I haven’t built any models for almost thirty years it was like starting over. And where did I start this time-- I started with Google and typed in “HMS Victory”. After visiting many sites, the first one being the official site and clicking countless numbers of those crazy links I decided to buy some books . Ordered these books: 1. HMS Victory Her Construction, Career and Restoration by Alan McGowan 2. The Anatomy of Nelson’s Ships by C Nepean Longridge 3. The Ship Model Builder’s Assistant by Charles G. Davis 4. Anatomy of the Ship The 100- Gun Ship Victory by John McKay I dug out some books I had from way back: 1. Ship Models from Kits by Colin Riches 2. Trafalgar The Nelson Touch by David Howarth 3. Sailing Ships, A Rand McNally Color Illustrated Guide by Attilio Cucari 4. HMS Victory Souvenir Guide Book – bought in Portsmouth ‘83 And went to the library and found these books: (it would have been great to find more but I’m in a land locked city close to mountains. No oceans here so not much maritime information available at the library. Oh well, they got $12 out of me and I got my lifetime library card for these two books: 1. Ship Modelling from Stem to Stern by Milton Roth 2. Wooden Ship-Building by Charles Desmond I can’t believe how much I've read about the Victory, Nelson and the Royal Navy in these past few months. I’m tempted to suggest that building the model is only part of the process. I am stoked to have discovered so much more about the Victory this time around. The internet is a wealth of knowledge and it would have been cool to have it around on the first go-around. Figure I haven’t done so much reading etc. since university! My career path has taken me along the computer highway so I am no stranger to these machines and software. I decided early that I would use the computer to retain the data. I’m sure most of you do too. One very useful internet tool for me has been Yahoo babel fish. This translates an internet page. It proved very useful because one can choose “all languages” in the search engines. When I found a page in a language I could not understand I used this link on a new tab: http://ca.babelfish.yahoo.com and copied the web address onto the babel fish page. Try it, the translation is not perfect but one can get a better gist of the page if you don’t understand the language. This is turning into a book! Back to the pictures! I started to find pictures just with the Google search. By typing “HMS Victory” in the search box, letting it find the sites and then clicking up at the top on images… voila... Image after image. It is truly amazing how many photos are on the net. And what fun it is to go to every photo. There are videos as well. Clicking on the video option lists many videos. Strangely enough, not many individuals have posted a walking tour HD video of the Victory. I’ve only found one good one. Here are the search engines that I use for general items and photos: Google, Bing, Yahoo, and sometimes Alta Vista. I found Truveo.com is great for videos as is YouTube. Just going to their home page and typing HMS Victory brought many videos to view. One of the best places to find photos is Flickr from Yahoo.
  5. Introduction It’s time to attempt something I’ve been wanting to have a go at for a long time. A frigate of the napoleonic era. Having spent a lot of time looking round, I decided that I had neither the tools, the time, nor the expertise currently to complete a fully-framed scratch build. I was drawn by Chuck Passaro’s HMS Winchelsea, not least because I am sure the instructions when they are released will be utterly brilliant and the builds look beautiful so far, however at the time of writing the prototype is not yet completed. Given these factors, added to the expense and difficulty in sourcing good quality wood in the UK, I came back to model kits. I hope to keep on dabbling in scratch building though, and I have a cross-section of Triton underway for that purpose. I wanted to build a model in 1:64, partly because it would give a good contrast to the boats I already have in the house, which are of the same scale. I looked at Victory Models, however, though there Pegasus and Fly models are very handsome in their own rights, I could not reconcile that they were not quite Frigate enough in my mind to fit the bill. Having built two of Caldercraft’s models in the past (HM Schooner Pickle and HM Cutter Sherbourne), I was keen to come back to the same manufacturer, as I have found their models to be rewarding to build, and to have a level of detail that is manageable, but results in great looking models. Sadly, HMS Surprise, though prototyped, has not been released by Caldercraft so that was not an option, though I am a great fan of the Aubrey / Maturin series by Patrick O’Brian. However, Caldercraft do have another Frigate already in their line-up. HMS Diana. An Artois-class Heavy Frigate of 38 guns. Having seen other builds of sister-ships on ModelShipWorld.com, and since I am married to a Classicist, my interest was piqued by the other boats in the class, and I settled on Ethalion – built in 1797. In part because I didn’t really want a scantily clad woman glued to the front of the boat when I finished it, and Ethalion brings the possibility of a dolphin. Once that was decided, it was time to break out google and a some books, and try and track down firstly, who Ethalion was, and secondly some of the history of this particular HMS Ethalion.
  6. Hello everyone Are we re-posting everything from start of the project, or from where we are at present contents http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/403-hms-victory-by-kevin-caldercraftjotika-172/ workshop makeover http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/403-hms-victory-by-kevin-caldercraftjotika-172/page-2#entry7118 beakhead chase cannons http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/403-hms-victory-by-kevin-caldercraftjotika-172/page-5
  7. Well, I'm a little late starting this building log, but it's been an interesting model to build, so I thought I'd share my experiences. Hope it's helpful, anyway. I'm hoping this will be an opportunity to try out some new skills and improve my planking skills before attempting something a bit larger! First off, a quick look at the kit itself. It comes in a small, but really nice and sturdy box, with everything packed in very neatly. The instructions are much more simple than the instructions for Pickle (a more recent kit, I believe), and reading them through I was glad I'd built Pickle first. Nevertheless, having build Pickle, these are perfectly adequate. The plans are excellent, and give lots of detail, including step by step illustrations for the construction of the hull. Looking closely you'll see the the walnut ply used for the cannon carriages and capping rails has been cut out right to the edge... on the other side this has led to a slight split going through the capping rail itself, but nothing too major, and it should be simple enough to put right (I'll mount it good side up!) So far I've found that all the materials are provided with plenty to spare, just as with Pickle.
  8. This is only my 5th build, first bluff hull. I was hoping to not create a build log but have run into some minor problems with the kit. I intend to keep this brief with mainly photo updates and limit comments if any. First problem with the kit are the six 4lb deck cannons. I think they should be 26 mm instead of the 45 mm supplied in the kit. I've contacted JoTika Ltd who posted the replacement cannons out 5 weeks ago, which have not yet arrived. So I'm following up with them regarding this. Also I ordered the Brown Admiralty paint set and the White set came instead, which I've decided to go with and use the replica paint scheme, even though Cornwall Model Boats kindly offered to re-send me the correct paint set. The next problem I had was with the bulkheads meeting flush with the ply at the keel. The keel is not deep enough for the rabbet (there is a conflict on the drawings as they seem to have forgotten to allow for the thickness of both layers of hull planks) so I had to cut the rabbet out of the false ply keel. Do do this I first had to trim around 2.5 mm from the underside of each bulkhead while maintaining the curve because the first planking is 1.5 mm plus the second planking is 1 mm. Then I marked and cut the bearding before glueing the stem, stern and keel on. Then I carefully dremeled a rabbet. Photos coming...
  9. Hi fellow builders, After 2 years of trying to build the HMS Victory, using the Caldercraft kit I think it's time to show some of my efforts on this forum. I live in Utrecht, The Netherlands, and I regard this as a 10-year project. Building is the fun part, time is of no essence as the fun is much less when the model is finished (speaking for myself). I chose the HMS Victory for several reasons: - The Caldergraft kit is essentially historically correct, although some research is still necessary. - The kit is technically very good, most parts fit without much adjustment - The "original" 1805 Travalgar version of the ship can still be visited in Portmouth and plenty of photo's circulate on the internet, therefore building a historically "correct" model is easier than of many other ships. - Many books can be found on the subject like Longridge, McKay and others. over time I collected a (very) small library on the subject. - There are some build logs of the Victory on the internet of excellent builders, notably Gil Middleton. In some instances my choices differ from theirs, but I will explain my choices as much as possible. In the weeks to follow I wil show the progress so far, which is as far as the 30 cannons on the Upper Gun Deck. Some basic facts about the HMS Victory: The HMS Victory was (and is) the flagship of the English Navy which defeated the combined French-Spanish fleet during the Battle of Trafalgar. Admiral Lord Nelson was mortally wounded during battle by a French sniper, but England won the battle. The HMS Victory is the 5th ship with this name and the largest by far. The ship was ordered in 1758. It is a First Rate Ship with more than 100 cannons. The design of the ship was completely devoted to firepower In 1805 (Trafalgar) ther were: - on the Lower Gun Deck: 30 cannons for 32-pound balls - on the Middle Gun Deck: 28 cannons for 24-pound balls - on the Upper Gun Deck: 30 cannons for 12-pound balls - on the Quarterdeck: 12 cannons for 12-pound balls - on the Forecastle: 2 cannons voor 12-pound balls and 2 carronades for 68-ponds balls(!!) The total length of the ship is about 70 meter, water displacement more than 2000 tons and almost 5500 square meter of sail can be carried. Some other numbers: 40km rope in the rigging, 1400 blocks, 300 tons of "potable" water, 50 tons of coals, 20 tons of wood, 50 tons of beer, etc. Index First and second planking Wales Gunports Coppering Upper gun deck, cannons and fittings Quarter Deck First an impression of the progress so far. I will try not to bore you with every individual bulkhead and plank. Details will be provided on request (of course).
  10. Super detailing the cutter Sherbourne, a guide to building the Caldercraft kit, by George Bandurek. I published this book in 2011 and at the time there were several threads that showed photos of my build. These are not now easily accessible so I have resurrected some of the information. The attached pdf files are extracts from the book that show how I tackled some of the topics. I would welcome any comments on these extracts, or if you have bought a copy of the book (thank you!) then please post a review. More information on the book is available on my website www.grbsolutions.co.uk. Buy direct and you will get a signed copy! George Bandurek Shrouds.pdf Sails MB.pdf Cannon.pdf Anchors.pdf
  11. The following is the reconstruction of my build logs for the Sherbourne following temporary loss of the Model Ship World Site in February 2013. First posted May 6th 2012. === It started with a birthday present in January of £200 from my daughter. What could I possibly want that would have some meaning over the year? I suddenly remembered that as a younger chap I had really enjoyed rigging plastic model ships, and had had a long-time yearning to work with wood. So on to the web, find out about ship models. Amazon for books, found 'The New Period Ship Handbook' by Keith Julier. It didn't give much (any) detail, but I thought maybe the Lady Nelson would be good. So researched that. Found this forum. Many days reading the variety of experience. Asked questions, thought about the Chatham as well, tried to get it but it was out of stock, so bought the Sherbourne Kit. My plan was not to go for the perfection of the other builds, but to get a basic understanding of the whole process, as I knew I would be making some frightful mistakes, and likely to be a bit messy as well. How right I was! Read all the planking advice on the Database, how to make filler blocks etc, then plunged in. Bought the kit, checked all the parts, stuck the tiddly little ones into the bags in the photo, put the frame together. Thought I'd be a clever little so-and-so and follow Danny's suggestion of inserting nuts in the hull to take pedestals at some future date. Even lined the bolts up with the bulkheads and epoxied the nuts in -- ensuring no glue was caught in the threads. All well and good ... so far.
  12. Hi All, This is my thrid kit build on MSW, and I'm taking on the HM Cutter Sherbourne from Jokita/Caldercraft. This will be my second "proper kit buid" on here as I started the Mantura/Sergal HMS President kit, and gave up on it due to the lack of decent intsructions and plans included in with the kit. My darling girlfriend (known as the Admiral) exceeded all expectations and bought me this kit for our anniversary in March. As you can all imagine, I was very very happy with this, and ended up maxing out the credit card on designer handbag(s) for her! So why start now?! In the last month or so, I have finished my build of HM Mortar Vessel Convulsion from Caldercraft, and was planning on joining a few other members on here to start a goup build of Sherbourne, but the Tennancy on my flat is up at the begining of August, so I was feeling a bit dubious about transporting the kit if we (the Admiral) decided we should move on to another property. Fingers crossed that won't be the case, but this is almost a preemptive strike to ensure the model is as safe as possible IF we do decide to move. Fingers crossed that we don't - I like our little flat! If you're interested in my Convulsion build, then click the link below. http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/8593-hm-mortor-vessel-convulsion-by-jonnyamy-caldercraft/page-1 So a kit bash? Because this is a special kit for me, I'd decided to make it is a little different! The main differences in the build from the kit will be: Replace Walnut planking layer with Basswood Replace Wales with Ebony Strips (if available) Treenailing of outer hull planking (to water line) Treenailing the Deck & Edge Planks Addition of Fife Rail around the Mast Rigging of sails (including all running rigging) Addition of Ships Boat Crew Figures (5 sailors max. 3 officers max.) Possible rebuild of the windless Replace White Metal cannon stock with Brass (white metal castings are terrible). So I'm about to buy the Basswood from Hobbycarft here in the UK, as they seem to be the cheapest source of Basswood strips I could find online. I will be using the book "Super - Detailing the Cutter Sherbourne: a guide to building the Caldercraft kit" by George Bandurek as my guide for the Kit Bash. I hope you all enjoy my journey in to the unkown of Kit Bashing, and tag along if you fancy it! Cheers Jonny
  13. HM Brig Supply 1759 Yard Transport / Convict Ship - the ship that, ahead of the first convict fleet, was first to enter Australian waters and what became Sydney harbour. First impressions; a very long, heavy box (the delivery note claimed it was 3Kg!), on opening I was surprised first by the amount of sawdust(!) then the reason for all the weight; copious amounts of 5mm thick ply and walnut panels very much in evidence, not to mention a staggering amount of planking, doweling etc. The quality of the wood and indeed the fittings appears good and that is very encouraging. The instructions; well, the actual written instructions little more than adequate, but the 6 huge sheets comprising the plans do seem very comprehensive and well produced. Time will tell! Construction has already begun, so my next post will be quite soon. Bryan
  14. To get a bit of an order here, and to overcome the 10 image limit, I redid the posts here All the older buildpics can be seen here: https://picasaweb.google.com/112214601525161753861/BauberichtSherbourneWasserzeichen?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCOr25uLXuOOWRw&feat=directlink Edit: I could restore a bit via Google Cache, I will edit here the next days: After a three year building break due to some private issues and high workload, I decided to start a small kit out-of-box just to build a bit and have fun ... haha .. not possible, I mean the out-of-box. Because of that and the long break I simply forgot some of my own rules for building: Measuring and Preparation all the time Now as it turned out not to be a "simple" build There are some, visible flaws, I have to live with (unfortunatley I am sure u will get what I mean ;-)). I also forgot lots of the english words for building a wooden build ship, sorry for that, and "help" is always appreciated. Anyway, as the build is allready in progress I will start with a little Photo-Story and some short comments, and will try to update the build regulary: Glueing the main wale made with ebony: Building the Gratings: Building the "don't know the word" Researching the Decklayout based on the original plan: The final Layout: Cheers, Dirk
  15. Hello! First time builder here, I used to build some plastic models and miniatures when I was a kid and been meaning to grab a more creative hobby for some time now. One day it hit me: I wanted to build a wooden ship model! After two weeks of research (and finding of this forum) I decided to order ship modeling simplified book by Frank Mastini as it was recommended by many and cheaply available. Soon after that I decided on Caldercraft's HM Cutter Sherbourne kit. I wanted a POB kit that was fairly cheap, of high quality and wuold someday yield a possibly quite a good looking model therefore the obvious choice was this cutter The kit arrived just today and with it some titebond wood glue, cutting mat, admiralty paint set and swann morton scalpel with two kinds of blades. I had researched ship building pretty much beforehand so opening the box was not so confusing as some people had described. I started right away by cutting the keel and bulkheads and dry fitting them. Before continuing I need to grab some tools on weekend inclucing sanding papers and block, a couple small clamps and possibly a dremel, as it is discounted at the moment. I'm not setting a deadline when I want this completed, as I have quite a lot happening at the moment with school and personal life, but hoping to complete this in about one year. I'm mainly building on weekends and maximum 10 hours a week so progress will probably be slow as well as updating this thread, but I'll very much hope the helpful users of this forum will follow and give me advice as I progress and maybe someday this build log cuold help another starting ship builder like me! Until next time! Anjuna
  16. HMS Granado, video 45, Installing the rat lines :HMS Granado (Part 46 ) The running rigging on the main mast
  17. Hello, I bought a few Caldercraft models some time ago, with the full intention to build them myself. Unfortunetly I ended up with a bunch of ships and literally no time to build them due to intensive work schedule. This won't be possible for me in the next few years, therefore I'd like to sell some of them. I have the following models: - HMS Victory - producer price 1199,00 USD - HMS Agamemnon - producer price 1099,00 USD - HMS Snake - producer price 349,00 USD - HMAV Bounty - producer price 329,00 USD - HM Schooner Pickle - producer price 229,00 USD All the formentioned models are in mint condition. I've opened the boxes once (to check if everything is in place), then closed them and they've never been opened since. I'm willing to sell them for 85% of the original price of the producer. 1) I currently have no pictures of the models, but will make some and update this post in about 6 hours time. I think that one photo for each model should be enough (an opened box with the contents inside). If you want me to take a specific photo, do not hesitate to let me know. 2) Of course I can give you my phone number via the private message system. 3) I'd prefer to recieve the money via a banks transfer, but I also have a paypal account. 4) I'm willing to negotiate the price. 5) My name is Piotr, I'm located in Poznań (Poland). 6) Other personal data can be recieved via the private message system. Currency of the transaction: PLN (Polish Zloty). Language of conversation: English (unless you know polish). Do take into account that the buyer will cover all the extra costs of the transaction (such as shipping, currency exchange, etc.). I you have any questions, please ask. Thank you.
  18. Hello Finally after looking at the box for almost ten years I have started on my Caldercraft HMS Victory. A lot of other projects has gotten in my way during the years and this will be a parralell build to my HMS Kingfisher build. Dunting task one might say but I could not help my self there are so many inspiring logs around here I had recently started my Corel HMS Victory all those years ago and during some research on the web for that build I came across some pictures of the CC HMS Victory beeing developed. Having realized that it was actually a kit and not a scratch build by someone, I had to have it !!! When I recieved my kit the first thing that struck me was the shere size of the thing. My daughter actually fitted inside the box Now that I have started the build she does not fit the box anymore Erik
  19. The Granado is my second wooden ship build. This follows the cutter Sherbourne which you can follow the link to in the MSW gallery. The Granado was chosen for a vessel offering more than a single mast but still able to be displayed in a reasonable space. Firstly a tribute to all the prior Granados on MSW's former incarnation - they proved immensely helpful and I owe a huge tribute to you all in helping to spot impending difficulties and work around them thanks to your efforts. After wantonly pillaging MSW for help with my first build it's time to add to the basket of knowledge that MSW members have so graciously given to me. This build is by no means complete but hopefully of use to others as I found previous members' posts. So on to the build... The build was started in April 2012 and at this stage I've just completed the second planking above the wales and filed out the gunports. The Caldercraft kit is all the usual business like efficiency with little in the way of complaints. The fittings are top quality with turned brass cannon, limewood for the first planking and walnut for the second. No, it's not a botch. The lens curve making the stem appear out of alignment here. One thing to watch for on this kit is setting the gunport patterns correctly. I thought I was being very clever in measuring the placement from the base of the keel. It resulted in patterns not quite meeting the tips of the bulkhead patterns. As a result at least half of the gunports had to be raised slightly. Better to just fit them to the tops of the bulkheads. Oh well. Another thing to watch for is the sweep ports. The instructions don't mention them until after the gunport patterns have been installed despite the plans showing them as illustrated. From there it's the somewhat more difficult matter of cutting them through from the outside and matching them up with the inner spirketting - no easy task. If your want the sweep ports showing on the inside then tak e gauge of where they should be before installing the gunport patterns and adjust once the lot is installed. It's not difficult but comes down to reading the instructions all the way through before taking any steps. I found it made more sense to skip ahead in the build and install the lower stern counter before the upper hull sides were planked. It allowed the upper stern counter to be shaped to fit and also allowed the wales to be shaped to fit around it. The black used here is probably a bit too dark to see the chase ports to best effect. That might be looked at later. The mortars went together nicely after some cleaning up. The mortars themselves are nicely cast brass that just needs some time with a file to bring out the best. Some brass wire handles were added as per Peter Goodwin's excellent Anatomy of the Sip Grandado book. The example here is the stern mortar - the smaller of the two on board. Following shots show the mortar surrounds in place which are identical for each of the two mortars aboard.
  20. Day one of the build at last. Those frames are a tight fit.
  21. I started this project in summer 2012. I choose this kit after browsing and reading many of the build logs in MSW 1.0, and because it has only one mast (I’m not much of a seaman except in the rather romantic way of reading Patrick O’Brian’s novels for the second time). The box contained all the promised parts in an orderly fashion, and a very short/thin instruction booklet. But there is help: Watch and learn on MSW 2.0 (in my case especially from Tony’s Sherbourne at http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/335-hmc-sherbourne-by-tkay11-–-caldercraft-–-scale-164-1763-a-novice’s-caldercraft-sherbourne/) Download the construction manual of Caldercraft’s Brig Badger, it explains and illustrates a lot of the details (i.e. principle of hull construction, guns …) which are very similar to the Sherbourne (http://www.jotika-ltd.com/Pages/1024768/Manuals_Badger.htm) Buy George Bandurek’s book “Super-detailing the cutter Sherbourne” (http://www.grbsolutions.co.uk/5.html), an inspiring guide to make much more out of a beginners kit Keel, bulkheads and deck came first, then balsa fillers fore and aft. Then I soaked the plywood bulwarks before bending them with the help of tea mugs and a good bottle.
  22. Hi All, This is my second build log on NRG Model Ship World. I have recently ordered the Caldercraft "Nelson Navy" HM Mortor Vessel Convulsion kit. I am still waiting for my delivery of the kit, but I am more than excitied to work on a decent kit with a well documented building process, unlike my ongoing build of HMS President by Sergal/Mantura. I have chosen Convulsion due to build and display space limitations.... I spent all of this weekend umm'ing and ahh'ing about the maximum size of a model, and eventually the "Boss" decided Convulsion was "big enough" for our 1 bedroom flat. Oh well, I'll just have to get a bigger flat for the next build!! As mentioned above, my build of HMS President is still ongoing, but I have been disheartend to a great degree over the lack of decent instruction for the teadious task of rigging. Currently, the Main Mast has all the shroads and running rigging in place, and all masts have the Fore-Aft standing rigging in place, but the prospect of running all the shroads, and ratlines on the fore and mizzen masts fills me with dread!! So, with this attitude in the back of my mind, as I slowly tackle President, I decided to give myself a decent break from her and work on something new. My initail thoughts for a new project were Granado, HM Yacht Chatam, or HMS Snake, but all were deemed too big by the Boss and so I gladly settled with Convulsion. Cheers, Jonny
  23. I bought this kit about three years ago after much research, forum visits, reviews and talking myself out of buying the Victory. Even though I've been on the Victory as a young sailor visiting Portsmouth, and had been favored with "the sailors" tour by one of the seaman stationed on board, I finally admitted that the Victory would be a poor choice for a beginner. I have years of experience as a plastic scale modeler even competing with IPMS USA and writing build reviews of kits. My interests distilled into Wingnut Wings WWI kits and large scale resin, wood and metal kits of American Civil War ironclads. However, as an eight year Navy veteran with many, many miles at sea and a one time voracious reader of Napoleonic War history and novels, I've always wanted to build a "plank on bulkhead" ship. Hence, H.M. Sherbourne. I almost started the Sherbourne about three years ago, but other issues – health, mainly – pushed that back until now. I've about finished my current Wingnut Wings model (a Roland C.II) and have been re-reading my few model ship building books and checking the internet again. I was previously signed up here when I thought my build would get off the ground, and to my surprise, it's basically a new site. Some kind of server crash I guess. Anyway, my old user name was still available so I luckily got it back and am moving in the direction of getting the Sherbourne started. I am looking forward to reporting my progress and posting questions here. Regards to all... Shellback PS I was inducted into the realm of Davy Jones in 1963 where the line and the dateline (realm of the Golden Dragon) intersect, hence it should really be "Golden Shellback", but I prefer the informal... I have met a few, very few, other Golden Shellbacks. Are there any here?
  24. Hi Guys, The Caldercraft HM William Gunboat 1:32 I was just wondering if anyone had any experience of, or have indeed built this ship? For the first time a search on site has produced no hits or information at all (apart from another gentleman asking similar questions 2 years ago). I've virtually finished my last build (Lady Nelson) and am searching for my next. Its a bit of an odd one but I find it intreguing. This is a Caldercraft, so should be of good quality, but I must confess one reason its attracted me is its scale; its a big 1:32 which I find most interesting after fiddling about with the 1:64 Lady Nelson. Any help, information or direction much appreciated. Thanks, Bryan