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Found 6 results

  1. Bowdoin in ice display build This build will be my first attempt at a diorama I wanted to start this log to record both the research and the effort to replicate an expedition scene. It is going to more about studying the ship from 1924-to say 1930, its expeditions and the making of the overall display rather than only the model itself. I know I am going to need help. More than 15 years ago, I either bought or was given the Bluejacket model of the Bowdoin. When I stared modeling schooners in about 2012, my first thought was to use the 1:48 kit information as a study and then to build a 1:24 sailing model. [ that is the scale of my Bluenose and it is fun!] I still may do that, I just have too many possible projects. I want to use this opportunity to explore more of a diorama display of a type of ship to better learn how it was used. The Kate Cory build that is now on hold will come back, and I will try to have a whale on the side being treated. For the Bowdoin I am not sure, but think I want to show her in the ice or afloat next to the ice set up for winter in the arctic. I hope to have this display ready for next summer as a local family store owner wants to make Boothbay Built schooners a feature of their new venue. I have offered this model up as a backup, as other Bowdoin models may come available. My thought is an icy diorama with the model in it. As I have tried on my other models, I am more about trying to find out how things worked and what they were like in old photos and then try to adjust the model in that direction. I hope I can carry that off. This log is also for the purpose of documenting those items. The local historical society has tons of visuals to review, and the Donald Macmillan material is all available at Bowdoin College that is only 45 minutes away. [ in the winter light traffic anyway]. My love of this boat started in 1962. I was a junior sailing instructor in a summer program in Massachusetts and Donald Macmillan came to talk to us and sell his book. I fortuitously bought an autographed copy that is still in my library. I have read it both years ago and then again more recently as part of my extensive reading about the arctic. So many items will fill in as we go, but to start off …where are we with the actual build? There are just a few old photos that show that in 2012 ish, as I was starting to play with 1:48 scale builds, so I could down size my scale experience to be able build the four masted Schooner Charles Notman. All I did at that time was to rough out the hull and set up the deck. I noted that the kit did not require nor include any line drawings. A few years later as I was researching the Boothbay Harbor One Design at the Boothbay Region Historical society, I found they have a copy of the William Hand design of Bowdoin….I got a copy of the section lines so in the future I could rough out a scaled hull in RC friendly larger scale . I am told the original drawings of all of Hand’s work is in the Hart Museum at MIT. In a casual search of their site, I was unable to find them in their data base. If anyone seriously wants them that is a place to go. So to the build…these photos are about about 5 years ago... . · Here I was using the famous bondo glazing putty to smooth out the hull. Looking at the results 6 years later, I would likely send it back for another few coats. Three days more maybe then would have been great…..oh well. · Here we got some base coats painted and deck stained. · Here we added the bulkhead strips · Here we have the cap rails on and I notice more putty fixing the sides. It seems that for some of us, we can only see those defects after the first base coats of paint. That is why I stared the filler prime process. …. just spilled milk as they say · Finally, here is furniture partially built or as supplied in the kit in place and we are resting waiting for any action. This roughly represents the amount of deck detail I would include for an RC model. I have taken what I can find of the unused kit material. Obviously after this much time, it is scattered, so I am sure I will make or reorder what I need. The bell by example is nowhere to be found. What big new thing do I want to learn? ……The most urgent modeling method study for this build is to find out where to buy and how to work with textured and tinted Acrylic sheets. I want to cut out a hole for the boat and maybe a dory. Then one looks from the side and sees the underwater hull, maybe a fish or two, or even the anchor. There are several of these in Lunenburg museum and they are stunning. So far, I only found one source and they need about $50 for one sheet about the right size. That’s fine if it is right, but I need to practice. I looked all over MSW and was unsuccessful finding any articles or logs that jumped out at me. Anyway that study and experiments will be part of this build…..also how to make ice? then if i get brave or find some help make people and dogs. all in time. Cheers jon
  2. To be honest, the boat in this diorama will be built near the end of the project. The diorama is going to be a working lift-span bridge with a boat traversing underneath it. The bridge fits on a 2.4 x 1.2 m (8 x 4 ft) tabletop. The scale is 1/72. There are no available plans for the bridge. Created my own plans from photographs and two diagonal reference measurements (road width and span length). An antiquated control console of the actual bridge will be converted to operate the model. Created my own electronics for the diorama. I am a volunteer for the Ballina Naval & Maritime Museum. They are funding the material costs. The diorama will be an interactive display for the museum. This is my second model I have ever built. The first was done 26 years ago. It was a 1/10 scale working Tesla coil used in Colorado Springs in 1899. The current model is halfway to completion. My task is not to make an exact reproduction, but a close simile. Available materials limit the accuracy, but I endeavour to do what I can. The boat is not following any plan other than my own. It has to look symmetrical because the boat only travels along a straight line under the bridge forward and back. Seventy percent of the project will not be directly related to the boat. I have considered the Shore Leave forum but felt that it would get in the way of all those fun threads and other non-modelling topics. So I hope you all don't mind me being here. The model is based on this bridge located at Wardell, NSW, Australia. The display area for the diorama will be something like this.. There are quite a few photographs to upload - to catch up to where I am currently at. When I do catch up I'll let you know in the post. to be continued.
  3. 1:24 Istanbul Diorama OcCre Catalogue # 53010D Available from OcCre for €60,95 If you’ve recently taken a look at our Istanbul tram review, you might like this particular review article. Yes, of course you can display your tram on a shelf, or in a cabinet, but what about outside Istanbul’s Grand Bazaar? That’s exactly what this new product from OcCre allows us to do, and with relative ease of construction. This is what OcCre have as their website product description: “The diorama is a representation of the entrance to the Grand Bazaar of Istanbul, one of the largest in the world. Located inside the old “walled city", on the European side of Istanbul, between Nuruosmaniye, Mercan and Beyazıt, with more than 58 covered streets and 4,000 shops or stalls, every day the bazaar attracts between 250,000 and 400,000 visitors. The bazaar offers a wide range of products, in particular jewellers, precious metal workers, spice shops and carpet shops. The stalls tend to be grouped together by type, following the tradition of the ancient guilds. The bazaar includes two Bedestens, or domed stone-built structures, which are used for the storage of merchandise. The first of these was built in 1464, by order of Mehmet II, although it then had to be mostly rebuilt in 1864, following the earthquake. This fabulous diorama combines perfectly with the tram of Istanbul, joining the nostalgic line of Taksim-Tunnel with the Grand Bazaar, in an effort to group two large emblems of the city of Istanbul.” The kit The Istanbul diorama is packaged into quite a plain, shallow corrugated cardboard box, with a colour product label attached. There is also a reasonable amount of weight here too, so you know there’s plenty of building material afoot. Upon opening the box, it ca be seen that the multitude of sheet material is wrapped in a heat-sealed sleeve that needs to be cut away. As the sheets in here are various sizes, and the internal box has no compartmentalisation, this is a good way of ensuring that damage risk is minimised. There are also a number of printed sheets which are rolled up, some strip timber and brass wire. A catalogue and sheet pointing to the instructions, are also included. More on the latter in a moment. The numerous sheets are made from MDF and are very neatly laser-cut. You will note how some of the parts have dovetail connections too. In essence, the entire diorama is built up from a series of wall panels that have the Islamic arch shapes that attach to them to create a 3D relief, and this is sat upon a base which is built from sections, to incorporate the ruts along which the tram lines would run. Oddly enough, there is no actual brass section strip to recreate the tram line itself, but instead, timber strip, painted silver, it what’s prescribed. Using some metal strip could be a nice enhancement, but you would need to purchase that yourself, measured against the OcCre tram wheels for best fit. The idea behind this diorama is that anyone can typically build it, simply out of the box contents. To decorate the walls and floors etc. a series of colour-printed textures are provided, on A4 sheets. These include stone, marble and parquet styles, and these need to be cut out to suit the various structures, and then glued into position with a glue stick, for example. Using wet glues may cause the sheets to ripple and not adhere as flat as they should, although the instructions do actually show brushed PVA as being the glue of choice. Sheets of paper are also supplied to simulate the Bazaar interior, with crowds of people and stalls etc. When it comes to depicting the exterior details, more printed sheets are supplied, with such things as Turkish rugs, flags etc, and these can be draped over the display stands that sit outside the various stalls on the exterior of the Bazaar. These stalls also have printed awnings to shelter them from the Turkish sun. To recreate the road itself, then a series of strip card is supplied. This needs to be cut into brick-sized sections, and then plastered over the road in a staggered manner. You can of course then paint and infill between them and add some airbrushed staining to weather things realistically. Brass wire is supplied for all manner of things, such as the random-looking electrical cables that run along the outside walls. OcCre supply no instructions for this kit. Instead, they provide an online build guide which is very comprehensive, showing everything right down to measuring out specific dimensions for everything. This multi-part guide is excellent, with the facility to be able to download each part as a PDF. To check out the guide, head to this link: http://www.occremania.com/diorama-de-istanbul-parte-8-2/ Conclusion Dioramas aren’t usually my thing, but this looks very tempting, just to see if I can make a reasonable attempt at it and add some airbrush work to make it look a little more lived in. There’s certainly a nice quantity of building material here, and all nicely produced. Recreating the street surface will also be quite absorbing, as well as those kerb stones that are cut from the thick strip timber. My sincere thanks to OcCre for providing the review sample seen here. To purchase directly, click the link at the top of the article.
  4. this used to be on MSW 1.0 i am hoping to find some of the older phots now lost, but have found this so far, enjoy, http://modelismoprofesionaldeescenas.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/trabajos-en-construcciondiorama-de.html
  5. This is what I did waiting for shipments of DeAgostinis Vasa: The lisboa Tram and the Diorama by Occre. My Iphone is not happy with the yellow color of the tram....
  6. Background It has been suggested that I should post a retrospective build log for my diorama of the sinking of the US gondola Philadelphia during the Battle of Valcour Island, Lake Champlain, in 1776. The final result is shown under “Diorama” in the gallery of completed scratch builds. A retrospective log may be unusual, but I hope that there are one or two ideas that others may find useful. If too many people get fed up with it, I’m sure they’ll tell me. The story started when I saw the Philadelphia in the Smithsonian in Washington DC. Although she sank in 1776, she was recovered in 1935 and is now on display, complete with the 24pdr British cannon ball that sank her. The Smithsonian has published a set of plans which I obtained (with some difficulty!)... .....but Philadelphia is a pretty basic and crudely built barge, and I decided that it wouldn’t make a very interesting model on its own. However, there is a modern painting by Earnest Haas of the US galley Washington standing by the Philadelphia and taking off the crew (Photo 4), and it struck me that this would form a good diorama. Washington was captured later in the battle, and the Admiralty, as was common practice, took off her lines. The draft is now in the National Maritime Museum in UK, and has been reproduced in a number of books. (I should add that my model was built before NRG published the plans for Washington). Although both vessels were small (Philadelphia is 53’7” OAL and Washington was about 80’ OAL), I have run out of room for large glass cases, so I decided on a scale of 1:144. (......to be continued)

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