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Found 12 results

  1. From the album Dordreght VOC Retour ship 1618

    The stern shows the maiden of Dordrecht. This statue from 1616 is still at the Groothoofdspoort in the City of Dordrecht
  2. From the album Dordreght VOC Retour ship 1618

    150 Feet long - which is roughly 43 meters. Build in 1618 - in 1619 one of the ships exploring the Australian coast - in 1628 part of the convoy together with the Batavia - burned and lost with her complete cargo in 1630 due to heavy fire (uncontrollable due to the brandy which was part of the cargo).

    © www.kolderstok.com

  3. From the album Dordreght VOC Retour ship 1618

    17th Century East India Man (retour ship) used for trading spices and goods between Holland and the Dutch East Idies. She was the vessel of Skipper Francisco Pelsaert before he became Skipper of the Batavia

    © www.kolderstok.com

  4. In 1606, the small Dutch ship, Duyfken, sailed from the Indonesian island of Banda in search of gold and trade opportunities on the fabled island of Nova Guinea. Under the command of Willem Janszoon, Duyfken and her crew ventured south-east. They sailed beyond Os Papuas (Papua New Guinea) and explored and chartered part of the coast of Nova Guinea. They did not find gold - but they did find the northern coast of a huge continent: Australia. Captain Janszoon was the first European to map and record Australia, so Duyfken's voyage marks the beginning of Australia's recorded history. In 2017, a full-size, ocean-going replica of the Duyfken returned to visit Elizabeth Quay, Perth, Western Australia. These are some photographs taken of that exhibition:
  5. Batavia was a ship of the Dutch East India Company (VOC). It was built in Amsterdam in 1628 and armed with 24 cast-iron cannons, and a number of bronze guns. Batavia, shipwrecked on her maiden voyage on Australian waters, was made famous by the subsequent mutiny and massacre that took place among the survivors. Replica of the ship was constructed in workshop Batavia Werf in Lelystad, Netherlands. Construction of ship lasting from 1985 to 7 April 1995. Ship never was seaworthy but visited Australia in 1999 as cargo on oceangoing barge. I have visiting Batavia Werf twice in 2003 and 2015. Weared by climatic conditions ship was under endless repairs. Topmasts was removed with yards and significant part of rigging. Part I The ship Foto 1 Ship under sails - from net Foto 2-5 captured august 2015 Foto 6 -9 captured spring 2003 Tadeusz
  6. From the album Batavia - 17th Century VOC Retourship

    A bit blur picture

    © JEvanNieuwkoop-NL

  7. From the album Batavia - 17th Century VOC Retourship

    © JEvanNieuwkoop-NL

  8. Title: Reconditioning an Eighteenth Century Ship Model, VALKENISSE Retourschip of 1717 Author: Rob Napier Publication Date: 2008 Publisher: SeaWatchBooks LLC. 19 Sea Watch Placé, Florence, OR 97439; www.seawatchbooks.com. ISBN: 978-0-9820579-0-2. Binding: Hardcover, 8"X 11" Edition: First Pp.: 253 Numerous photographs, drawings, five appendices including tables, brief glossary of Dutch terms, index, four plans. Valkenisse, a “retourschip,” meaning a return ship, was a Dutch East Indiaman belonging to the Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC) or United East India Company. Built in Middelburg in 1717, the vessel sailed between Holland and Batavia (now Djakarta) taking supplies out and expensive merchandise back, making seven round trips before being wrecked in 1740. While Valkenisse was lost, a model of her still exists, almost 300 years after an unknown builder created it to decorate VOC headquarters in Middelburg. This model is now in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts (MFA), Boston. Valkenisse, one of twenty retourschip models in existence, was damaged and devoid of its masts and rigging when MFA asked Napier if he would like to rig the model, this despite the fact that two others had worked on the model in the previous hundred years and there was little information as to what either had done. The book, beautifully written and produced, documents Napier's ten-year reconditioning process, a term he feels is more appropriate, with much of the time spent on vast amounts of research, study and old- fashioned detective work to decide what had been, how, and by which builders hand - the original builder, an unknown English one, or a later American owner. The book contains a foreword by Albert Hoving, ship model restorer at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam; the preface is by Gerald W.R. Ward, senior curator of decorative arts at MFA, Boston. Hoving, Ward and others provided support during the reconditioning and book-writing process. Chapters are as follows; Opportunity, Provenance, Research Sources including studies and photos of most of the existing retourschips, The Riddle of the Scales, Preparing the Berth, The Hull Below the Main Rail, The Hull, Main Rail and Above, Going Aboard (a tour of the model) Sparring, Rigging Preparations, Standing Rigging, Running Rigging and the Final Steps, followed by five appendices, a glossary, sources and an index. There are also four folding plans by Napier in a pocket on the inside back cover. The book is lavishly illustrated, primarily with Napier's photos and illustrations. If I never build this boat, it is still worth having it in my library. Thank you, Marc
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