trippwj

In need of shipyard workers or boats crewmembers

90 posts in this topic

What size would be at 1:90 scale?

6 feet tall = .8 inch or 20.32 mm

5'8" tall= .755 inch or 19.17 mm.

 

The good part about 1/90 scale is that it is easy to use 1/87 HO scale figures.  As others have said, Preiser is among the best. Get the unpainted sets. "in the country" has some nice poses and easily adaptable clothing, some of the military sets have separate heads and hands ("resting infantry" is one of my favorites for conversions) that can be mixed and matched for a variety of figures.

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Verlinden is another source for figures and accessories - I used them for WWII battle dioramas but they can be bashed into anything. Here's their link https://www.verlindenonline.com/

 

Jack

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imirir risley (saratoga soldier.com) have 3 late 1700, sailors, an american 1812 officer, abd a carronade and cannon. rose (joneden.com have a couple of officers, and a Nelson, not to mention  two sailors. valiant miniatures have a midshipman with a sextant, a powder monkey, nelson and a marine. as well as john paul jones, an american revolutionary sailor, and from 1812, Oliver Hazard Perry. Nemrod have a boat with three sailors and an officer. metal Models have a matelot. john jenkins have a 1760's landing craft, with sailors and soldiers, as well as two standing naval figures. Fireship models have a quartermaster with a ship's wheel, a crew for Constitutions fiighting top, and alsobthree marines. El veijo dragon have a figure of Jack aubrey. Verlinden's carronade includes a sailor, and verlinden used to make a marine officer and a long cannon (get these back into production. Pheonix  make a standing and seated British admiral (s &d). there are also more spanish & French sailors about; l made up a list last year, and I'll try and find it to post it. Forgive the spelling, I'm getting used to a new keyboard. Edinrog

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I'd like to have some 1:75 scale 18th century Sailors, Officers and even dock workers. I'm getting a fine run around the internet for things I have no use for. 

Any advice on a good supplier? I don't mind doing the painting myself either.

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Figurines for use as 18th century scale 1:48 Naval soldiers on models of that period,

 

some months ago I was considering the build of the British Naval cutter "Alert" of 1777 after Peter Goodwin`s book and plan. Looking for 1:48 scale deck soldiers I found these.... and would like to share the find with fellow builders here on MSW.

 

http://scenearama.woodlandscenics.com/show/Item/SP4454/page/1

 

the kit comes with good looking, fully painted soldiers, 3 American and 2 British, in appropriate period coat of arms 

 

Nils

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People always ask me how long it takes to build one of these fully rigged 18th century type ships. I tell them a couple of years if you do a rush job.

Then I tell them to imagine  50 or so men working to mill, shape and put on maybe 1 hull plank a day. Then I thought to myself " it would be cool to have

50 little ship builders, dock workers, wagons etc . all  working on my ship It would kind of put things into perspective as well as helping with the scale of things. So My ship is an 80 foot Frigate at 1:75th scale. The nearest I can find to that scale in figures is HO or 00. but it's not quite right and finding historical sailors and dock workers has been unsuccessful so far. Any Ideas would be appreciated. Then I can have my little guys build for me while I sleep. You know. Like Elves. Right?

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People always ask me how long it takes to build one of these fully rigged 18th century type ships. I tell them a couple of years if you do a rush job.

Then I tell them to imagine  50 or so men working to mill, shape and put on maybe 1 hull plank a day. Then I thought to myself " it would be cool to have

50 little ship builders, dock workers, wagons etc . all  working on my ship It would kind of put things into perspective as well as helping with the scale of things. So My ship is an 80 foot Frigate at 1:75th scale. The nearest I can find to that scale in figures is HO or 00. but it's not quite right and finding historical sailors and dock workers has been unsuccessful so far. Any Ideas would be appreciated. Then I can have my little guys build for me while I sleep. You know. Like Elves. Right?

 

 

G'day Captain71, here is a link to Cornwall Model boats, they sell sailors in various sizes, ie 22mm and also 25mm and 35mm, click on link below,

 

                           http://www.cornwallmodelboats.co.uk/acatalog/amati_crew.html

 

 

best regards John.

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Can't help with Elves, but the British OO-scale is nominally 1:76, so there may be something suitable in British railway modellers ranges. Have a look here for instance: http://www.langley-models.co.uk/

 

British OO-scale white-metal figurines don't have the same standard of sculpting as, say, the German Preiser HO-scale (1:87) hard plastic ones, but some of them seem to be quite nice.

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I usually deal with ships around or at 1/200th.
I make my own figures out of plastic styrine.
These figures include muskets (for fighting top Marines and gun deck Marines) sailors and marines climbing the ratlines, sailors in the crow-nest with telescopes or hand over mouth shouting down to the main deck and pointing, bearded, mustached, and clean shaven figures, gun crews with powder bucket, lighting the fuses, loading the cannon balls, and swabbing out the barrels, crewmen swabbing the decks,.  also have made ship musicians consisting of a guitar and/or banjo player, harmonica player, squeeze-box player,fiddler, fifer, vocalists, sailors dancing the jig, and drummers ( marines pounding "General Quarters". Sailors and officers covered and uncovered in various poses to include laying on their racks or hammocks in the interior of the ship in various modes of dress and undress, oar rowers, coxswains, carpenters, sail makers, ship cooks, captains and other officers, sailors on the masts rigging in or letting out sails, bos'n's, master of arms, armed sailors and Marines in various poses (such as side guards, inspections, hand and saber salutes, reading of orders,deck battles and /or battle training)
I make the sailors and marines weapons from muskets, flintlock pistols, blunderbusses, pikes, sabers, cutlasses, swords, daggers, belaying pins, etc.
I have made the cannons, swivel guns,  cannon chassis's, powder buckets, anchors, ratlines, fighting tops, crows nests,masts, yards, block and tackle, thread rigging, ship wheels, rudder control steering, compasses, capstans, heads, ( which makles me wonder why the poop deck is on the stern but on large sailing ships the heads were over the bow,)fore top ladders, boarding ladders, railings, deck drains protected main deck musket ports, cannon ports, paper flags, lanterns, hatch covers, long, life, and row boats, barges, rudders of all sizes, stern and side davits, iron pots, stoking poles,  deck houses and below deck entries from the main deck, skylights,  plates rum bottles, kegs, flasks, water barrels with open lids and water, dippers, crewmen drinking and eating, wooden eating and cooking utensils, food, fish being cleaned and gutted, crewmen smoking or holding clay pipes, doing laundry, tubs, tables chairs,cabin fireplaces and chimneys to the deck stacks, sea chests, beds (officers quarters,) tea pots, glasses, mugs, candlesticks and holders, uniform coats folded over chairs or hanging, boots, officer and seamen hats,open deck brick warming pits with ashes and or fire,smoke, galley stacks,windows ( to include frames and panes), etc.
All crew member figure uniforms are painted to include shoulder epaulettes, shirts, scarves, belts, buckles, buttons, sword sheathes, cartridge boxes, cargo boxes, with brushes, needles, or toothpicks. 
It takes alot of time, patience, swearing dropping small items from tweezers, more swearing, especially when heat and cold shaping small objects such as cup, pot, handles.)
It's cheaper than purchasing all of these things and is fun, You are only limited by your imagination and patience.

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Hi all,

 

I have found a 3d sculptor to work with and am currently running some test output on an SLA / 3d printer. Currently the test figure shown here is being done in 28mm, but can be scaled up or down a bit fairly easily. The goal in this project is to create several limes of figures in a few scales ( covering 1/60 - 1/48 range ) initially and that they be in "action" poses, not simply standing around. The figures will be prototyped with 3d printing, molded, and then cast in either resin or pewter. These will be officer and crew figures of the 18th and 19th century period.

 

- Joe

post-10619-0-49709900-1478110399_thumb.jpg

post-10619-0-51050700-1478110413_thumb.jpg

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Not bad at all. If I may make a suggestion: I would not produce them with a base, but rather have some sprues or something sticking out of their feet - this would allow to drill appropriate holes into decks etc. for fixing them.

 

It might be also an idea to offer them at one of the 3D-printing service providers for scaleable printouts - thinking of smaller scales.

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Wefalck,

 

Good suggestions. I will be looking over the prototype print in just a little while. Additional model prototypes are being run in different scales. We are looking at what happens to the detail level. I'm not a fan of bases either, so there will likely be an option of with or without bases. The base came about as these figures can be used for wargaming.

 

The other option I'm looking at, is making them available as already cast pieces, or as a downloadable file that one may print either at home or through a service.

One problem with making files available through an outfit like Shapeways for example, is that the creator gives up Intellectual Property Rights as I understand it....I'm looking into that to get the facts.

 

Some figures planned will not have a base option, as they are "in action" , i.e; sail handling on the yard, or climbing the rigging, etc.

 

I will post some photos later today of the printed prototype.

 

-Joe

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Ok, so I picked up a few prints and after a quick trimmimg of supports and no further clean up....... Here is the test 28mm figure ( 32mm and 35mm coming later this week ) The detail is quite good, rather hard to see here, and perhaps I will try an ink wash to show the recesses a bit better.

 

-Joe

post-10619-0-81756800-1478138149_thumb.jpg

post-10619-0-82535800-1478138165_thumb.jpg

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It may the way how the figurine was photographed and that it is sort bend on the knees, but the legs appear to be rather short compared to the upper body. Also, the area around the right elbow seems a bit thin compared to the lower arm ...

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Wefalck,

 

Yes I initially thought the same, as the nature of the pose, and my lousy photography ( paper in front of bulb to try and diffuse the light and an older cell phone camera ), do sort of make it appear that way. It does actually measure out properly. The figure is also a little 'stocky' to my eye, and now that we have a printed prototype, I will be discussing a few adjustments with the artist. Neither of us were quite sure just how well the details would hold up in this 28mm size given the printer we used to output it and we are establishing a baseline.

 

This also illustrates why creators of figures in small scales tend to exaggerate some features - though not correct, to provide what many consider to be a visually appealing look. Sort of like plank nails being shown for effect, when in reality ( for small scales ) you would never see them.

 

One company, in my opinion, that makes really good looking figures without this sort of distortion, is Preiser. Unfortuntately they don't make figures in this genre that I am aware of.

 

I appreciate any and all feedback, as the goal is to create good looking figures that people will want to use to crew their ships.

I will be posting more images in the coming weeks and months as we get more figures done.

 

 

Thanks,

Joe

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Yes, the Preiser sculpting and anatomy is my benchmark. I have used them for one-off conversions. I cannot stand those garden dwarf-like 'wargaming' figurines - I gather the reason for their stocky built is to provide for more rugged handling during the game, but they are not good for scale models.

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Actually, the proportions of most wargames figures are for ease of painting...notice how often you see heavy layers and oversized details on uniforms? ..they do also like to have beefy weapons to help against breakage though and to make the castings a bit easier to produce....I'm told...though I find that to be an excuse. As such, they tend to "swell" the figure to match. I call them caracatures. Sadly it is the accepted 'standard' there.

 

My goal with these is to keep them on the more proportioned and realistic side as much as possible. ( understand that the digital sculptor I'm working with comes from the gaming side of things :) It is another reason why I value the feedback on the figures when I post pictures. I prefer the scale aesthetic.

 

Thanks,

Joe

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The next figure I'm working up is going to be a crewman in rowing pose ( actually, going to create a couple different, but similar poses / dress for this )

Expect an update in a few weeks on this one.

Also, I should have the 35mm figure back in a day or so to inspect. That will work nicely for 1/50-1/48 scale.

 

Thanks all,

 

Joe

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I usually deal with ships around or at 1/200th.

I make my own figures out of plastic styrine.

These figures include muskets (for fighting top Marines and gun deck Marines) sailors and marines climbing the ratlines, sailors in the crow-nest with telescopes or hand over mouth shouting down to the main deck and pointing, bearded, mustached, and clean shaven figures, gun crews with powder bucket, lighting the fuses, loading the cannon balls, and swabbing out the barrels, crewmen swabbing the decks,.  also have made ship musicians consisting of a guitar and/or banjo player, harmonica player, squeeze-box player,fiddler, fifer, vocalists, sailors dancing the jig, and drummers ( marines pounding "General Quarters". Sailors and officers covered and uncovered in various poses to include laying on their racks or hammocks in the interior of the ship in various modes of dress and undress, oar rowers, coxswains, carpenters, sail makers, ship cooks, captains and other officers, sailors on the masts rigging in or letting out sails, bos'n's, master of arms, armed sailors and Marines in various poses (such as side guards, inspections, hand and saber salutes, reading of orders,deck battles and /or battle training)

I make the sailors and marines weapons from muskets, flintlock pistols, blunderbusses, pikes, sabers, cutlasses, swords, daggers, belaying pins, etc.

I have made the cannons, swivel guns,  cannon chassis's, powder buckets, anchors, ratlines, fighting tops, crows nests,masts, yards, block and tackle, thread rigging, ship wheels, rudder control steering, compasses, capstans, heads, ( which makles me wonder why the poop deck is on the stern but on large sailing ships the heads were over the bow,)fore top ladders, boarding ladders, railings, deck drains protected main deck musket ports, cannon ports, paper flags, lanterns, hatch covers, long, life, and row boats, barges, rudders of all sizes, stern and side davits, iron pots, stoking poles,  deck houses and below deck entries from the main deck, skylights,  plates rum bottles, kegs, flasks, water barrels with open lids and water, dippers, crewmen drinking and eating, wooden eating and cooking utensils, food, fish being cleaned and gutted, crewmen smoking or holding clay pipes, doing laundry, tubs, tables chairs,cabin fireplaces and chimneys to the deck stacks, sea chests, beds (officers quarters,) tea pots, glasses, mugs, candlesticks and holders, uniform coats folded over chairs or hanging, boots, officer and seamen hats,open deck brick warming pits with ashes and or fire,smoke, galley stacks,windows ( to include frames and panes), etc.

All crew member figure uniforms are painted to include shoulder epaulettes, shirts, scarves, belts, buckles, buttons, sword sheathes, cartridge boxes, cargo boxes, with brushes, needles, or toothpicks. 

It takes alot of time, patience, swearing dropping small items from tweezers, more swearing, especially when heat and cold shaping small objects such as cup, pot, handles.)

It's cheaper than purchasing all of these things and is fun, You are only limited by your imagination and patience.

I'd like to see your work. Got any pictures ?

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Just a quick note.....we have been making some fine tuning adjustments on the 3D printer, and the test figure is more sharply defined. Additionally, we have done output in 32mm, 35mm and 54mm. In 54mm, you can even see the wood grain in the axe handle quite nicely ! We are going to run some tests on even smaller scales soon as well.

 

Aardvark Miniatures, LLC should be releasing some of the first figures at the beginning of 2017.

 

-Joe

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