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archjofo

La Créole by archjofo - Scale 1/48, French corvette of 1827, scratch build

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Hello Michael, Paul,
@deadbrotherbear,
and @aviaamator,
thank you for your interest and the nice comment. Also thanks to all for the LIKES.

Here is a little update:
I had completely forgotten the coppering of the mizzen mast in the upper area as protection for the jaw of the gaff. I remembered how I made the leather for the gaff.

 

DSC07056.thumb.jpg.730cafebd7862a64e4a152a955b12f79.jpg
Another detail for the mizzen mast is a fitting for the topping lifts of the davits.

DSC07061.thumb.jpg.f6be0f14767b05fa5c37f68b657a6851.jpg

Edited by archjofo

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darker is dull, lighter more contrasting. It depends on how you want to show her - the ship in total - and how much you want to have singular parts stand out. When I look at the metal work against the wood, the ropes from your hammock nettings ...  you need to look at the bigger picture and look at it from a distance, not from close up.

 

Very impressive though

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hms victory example and another 

 

30 minutes ago, rwiederrich said:

It's not about dull contrast...its about accuracy.  Light lanyards are not accurate....ever.

Then again if you are show-boating.

 

Rob

There you are wrong Rob, for then the model should be painted accurately as well. It's up to the builder in my opinion, which has nothing to do with "show-boating" as you call it

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I gather there are two 'extreme' ways of presenting a model, in an 'artisanal' style, to demonstate one's artisanal skills and with aesthetics in mind, or in a 'realistic' style, that shows, how a ship may have looked at her time. The latter style is common among plastic modellers, while those, who build wooden ship models seem to go for something in between the two extremes, but leaning often towards the more 'artisanal' one. In the latter case you can have any artistic, or rather artisanal license you want, but we also seem to have certain conventions ...

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8 minutes ago, cog said:

hms victory example and another 

 

There you are wrong Rob, for then the model should be painted accurately as well. It's up to the builder in my opinion, which has nothing to do with "show-boating" as you call it

Then I suppose I'll remain wrong.  From the details the builder is employing in the iron work and skillful application of every detail of his build...applying the appropriate tar mixture of preservation to the lanyards would not be considered inaccurate as Wefalk has concured.

 

White lanyards are not accurate...no mater how contrasting they are to make a build look balanced.  I used the phrase *show-boating* to delineate between what one thinks looks good to what was actually a practice...regardless of appearances.

 

I meant no disrespect to anyone for stating the facts as I know them.

I wonder where the marine historians and architects went wrong when rebuilding the constitution? 

 

Respectfully Rob

IMG_6963-1-1024x683.jpg

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23 minutes ago, wefalck said:

I gather there are two 'extreme' ways of presenting a model, in an 'artisanal' style, to demonstate one's artisanal skills and with aesthetics in mind, or in a 'realistic' style, that shows, how a ship may have looked at her time. The latter style is common among plastic modellers, while those, who build wooden ship models seem to go for something in between the two extremes, but leaning often towards the more 'artisanal' one. In the latter case you can have any artistic, or rather artisanal license you want, but we also seem to have certain conventions ...

Well phrased shipmate.

I concluded what I did and boldly spoke to the extreme accuracy of detail Johann has employed in this particular model.  He has spared no detail...and it wasn't a stretch to imply he should continue that stretch and include the detail of properly treating the lanyards.  Why go *Artisanal* at this junction, when in fact his entire build is a magnificent representation of his artistic skill.

 

 

If, as an artist, you want to paint red lips on a pig.... be artistic, but if you want to aesthetically and accurately represent a pig, then you forgo the lipstick.

Nuff said.

 

Clear sailing.

 

Rob

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Hello,
thank you for your interesting discussion on the design of models.
it is perfectly legitimate to express different views.

In the meantime, I have worked a bit further and made the standing parts for the lower main tackles.

DSC07136.thumb.jpg.98f38a43695c0e71e43c014b0018b9f5.jpg

 

DSC07141.thumb.jpg.6980ca5215f01bf500e30e368bc1a15a.jpg

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Johann would it be possible to include a picture of the other side of the spool traveler. I am interested in how it is supported on the steel rod.

Beautiful work on the worming and serving.

Michael 

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Hah! I had long discussions with a very knowledgeable gentleman some years ago. I had argued that laniards were running rigging as they were adjustable, but he persuaded me (eventually!) that they were tarred to protect them against seawater. So - dark laniards are more 'correct'.

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6 hours ago, michael mott said:

Johann would it be possible to include a picture of the other side of the spool traveler. I am interested in how it is supported on the steel rod.

Beautiful work on the worming and serving.

Michael 

Sorry to intrude into your conversation, but the server (spool traveler - as you called it) isn't supposed to be supported in any way by this steel rod below. At least in my instance, mine hungs freely under the rope being served, suspended only by the serving thread. The gravity alone provides enough torsion and tension for serving. If the server tries to rotate around the rope, it means that there is too much tension on the thread, and you have to very slightly loosen up the screw on the bobbin so that it moves a bit easier.

Perhaps the pics from Johann were taken from up and showed erroneously in perspective that the bobbin somewhat rests on the rod?

Or maybe his does rest on the rod?

 

I would like however to know, how he did the worming on that rope.

Edited by Dziadeczek

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@michael mott

Hello Micheal,
today I took a picture of the spool traveler.

This runs on the lower axis.

I hope that your question has been answered.

DSC07150.thumb.jpg.34b634171fd0fa6baf05e05056e5c70d.jpg


@Dziadeczek
Hello Dziadeczek,
in fact, the spool traveler rests on the axis.
In the following picture you can see how I worming the rope.
This works very well with the serving machine.

DSC07147.thumb.jpg.a0436e151d32835d66ee469826ab1f12.jpg

Edited by archjofo

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Johann, it has been said here and elsewhere already very often. The way you are planning your work, the way you are performing it and especially the way you are able to reflect yourself and change things if necessary is simply astonishing. If you were a bridge builder, a car constructor, a rocket scientist: Be sure I would love to jump on your bridge, perform a speed run in your car and fly to Mars in your space ship. I dare to say: You are a shining example of German engineering. It is a pleasure to watch your build log and especially its constancy over the years. Thank you for posting it here for all of us!

 

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