shihawk

How much detail is too much

64 posts in this topic

As a model maker you are an artist, you are making your IMPRESSION of what you see - if it is a very small model, then you are looking at it from a distance and will expect to see somethings and not others - as goes the same if it is a larger model - the guide is to only make what you expect to see and you will make a work of art.  Go beyond that and start adding detail for details sake, and you will most likely move out of scale, and kill the whole effect.  The best guides are photos of the full size subject, add the detail that you can see - if it is a hinge, but only looks like a spot, represent it as a spot and not a hinge and it will look CORRECT in the finished model.  If you are an addict for detail, then pick a scale that suits your abilities and the subject, but the rule, if it be a rule, will be the same- for me that is. Check out:

http://www.wworkshop.net/Other_Models/Gallery-1.html#6

http://www.wworkshop.net/Other_Models/Gallery-1.html#11

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I would tend to agree with you concerning level of detail and scale - but: unfortunately, unlike in a photographic image, the viewing distance is not fixed. Though in general, one may view a model from, say, half a metre or a metre distance, one may also put the nose over it. If I were to design a model, for instance, as a film prop and it would only be seen from a certain distance, I would indeed put the level of detail on it that is needed to give the 'right' impression. For a show-case model the situation is rather different. Here you need to create the 'right' impression for various viewing distances.

 

For certain details it may be safer to err on the small side ...

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Gaw in Sunny Spain mentioned a hinge.  Try this for a spectrum of detail by scale:

Real life- built in a factory, or forged by a blacksmith, tool marks here and there, bolt or rivet heads with shanks.

Large scale- hand made piece of brass, working pin, tool marks gone, bolt heads, may be used to attach the hinge.

Medium scale- flat piece of brass, maybe plastic or paper, simulated pin, simulated bolt heads, possibly glued in place.

Small scale- brass foil or paper, glued in place.

Tiny scale- hinge simulated with paint.

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All great comments. All details should be considered in light of the overall artistic effect of the model as a whole. Having said that, I know that I have made some very fine and time consuming details that no one will see in the end, but I did them anyway. I think for 2 reasons: first, to push my limits and see if I could do it; and two, because I was curious about how the detail was built. building the details helped me understand how these ships were made, and how the parts functioned.

 

Good thing my overall deadline is to complete the ship just before I pass away....

 

Mark

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In my opinion the view distance is set by the scale that is used, which when combined with the skill of the model maker and the materials to be used will determine the detail to be included.  Hinge detail at 1/96th scale, just completed and made to work - just to see if it could be done and to have fun - which is what it is all about.

post-20237-0-04903300-1440086527_thumb.jpg

post-20237-0-42453600-1440086554_thumb.jpg

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When you consider that the exquisite bone models built by the French prisoners of war had huge parts of the interior built in to them, never to see the light of day with out the models been destroyed You can only conclude that they did it because they could rather than because they should.

Andy

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In answer to Bill - I am both an impressionist  - for what I make can only be my artist impression of what I see - and also a realist - in that I know my limitations, and that of the materials that I have to use.

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Adding detail is a matter of preference and how much time you want spend on it/with proper skill,just for an exemple tke a look at this Hungarian modeller what quality and detail has been built into his HMY Caroline.Realt worth time to check all the pictures!!

 

http://www.shipmodell.com/index_files/SHIPMODELL_ROYAL_CAROLINE.htm

 

And the Pandora was built for almost 20 years,20000 work hours!!

 

 

 

http://www.shipmodell.com/index_files/SHIPMODELL_PANDORA.htm

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I feel troubled looking at those pictures . maybe i should quit this hobby right now , cause that is just scary ????!!!!!!!!!!!

Now I know what you are up to,cmon isn't this inspirational? Lol

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One relevant factor to the "less perfectionist" modeler is that too much detail can extend hugely the build time and slow the progress rate.

Some find great satisfaction in building one small  small piece of work  after another to great standards.

But others think - as I believe was said on here - " I am building a vessel not an assemblage of bits"

Better a completed model with a moderate level of detail than an abandoned one.

 

I have done every level myself - when the kit first came out  I built a couple of Flys in very short time indeed - and they look OK  to a non modeller I think but not to a modeller! The speed was partly because I " built the box" and added no detail .

On the other  hand my record is a bit of carving just over a cm long on Snake which  carried me through most of a winter.

At the moment I have spent weeks and weeks trying to get the deck planking patterns for a build to my satisfaction and practicing nibbing - no one will notice but its satisfying to do.

 

One point I do feel though is that rigging of both vessels and guns is very very very hard to get to look right and the more detail you attempt the harder it gets -  somehow - at least to me - detail on the  hull comes easier.

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Have you seen Doris's Royal Caroline? We have quite a few builders here doing that level of work.

Can you get the link for me please?

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Thank you for the link zoly99sask that is truly impressive, it makes one humble to think how far some of us have yet to go to active the ultimate - but very good to see just what can be done with skill and time when you put your mind to it.

 

It is a very impressive web site in general and well worth a detailed look at all the models, there is much to be learnt there.

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Janet B.

 

                                               As regards the amount of detail,i think a small amount of neatly done detail is far better

 

                                              than a model with a lot of detail badly done.

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Adding detail is a matter of preference and how much time you want spend on it/with proper skill,just for an exemple tke a look at this Hungarian modeller what quality and detail has been built into his HMY Caroline.Realt worth time to check all the pictures!!

 

http://www.shipmodell.com/index_files/SHIPMODELL_ROYAL_CAROLINE.htm

 

And the Pandora was built for almost 20 years,20000 work hours!!

 

 

 

http://www.shipmodell.com/index_files/SHIPMODELL_PANDORA.htm

 

 

I have seen some modelling skills in the past few years - but I've just had the privilage of spending 30 minutes with my jaw constantly hitting my desk as I surveyed the photographs of the Pandora build - and I've only just looked at a small part.

 

Should all models be built to that level of detail?

 

Well I personally would absolutely love to have even 1% of the skills to be able to come anywhere near this level of detail - and that would be when using a kit!!

 

And then I realise that this is a complete Scratch build - I'm afraid I don't have long enough to live to learn these skills.

 

Meantime, I return to my attempt at building Pickle to the very best of my abilities so that when she is finished I can look at her with pride of a job well done........

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zoly99sask, on 15 Oct 2015 - 9:52 PM, said:snapback.png

Adding detail is a matter of preference and how much time you want spend on it/with proper skill,just for an exemple tke a look at this Hungarian modeller what quality and detail has been built into his HMY Caroline.Realt worth time to check all the pictures!!

http://www.shipmodel...AL_CAROLINE.htm

And the Pandora was built for almost 20 years,20000 work hours!!



http://www.shipmodel...ELL_PANDORA.htm

  Thanks for the links,.....the work found here is SCARY GOOD!!! ... just goes to show that there is no limit to how much detail  can go into a build, scratch or kit build.

 

JP

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I found a 1:48 scale cello and violin that I just must get into my HMS Surprise. I like detail though I would not be a bolt counter about it. I understand the work that goes into a craft such as ours and would enjoy the results regardless of the detail. The elegance of simplicity is just as attractive as the super detailed.

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I got my first model when I was about 5 years of age. I put it together over and over again using scotch tape. Loved that 1st model.

Here I am now at 62 years of age, and I've advanced to actually using glue, but I still love it! :rolleyes:  When I get tired of it (building models), I put it down and do something else for a while. I always come back to it later when I feel like it. And it always keeps me happy, no matter how much attention to detail I place in it. But that's just me.

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On small details I generally apply a scale 'rule'

If the part scales down to a size I don't think I am capable of making then I drop it.

I don't like the approach where a part is made within a persons capability but when scaled up is actually twice real size.

i.e. If a stanchion scales up the be 5" dia. then it will never look right if it was a 2" dia. metal post.

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