Jump to content
The Journal is now Digital Read more... ×
EdT

Young America extreme clipper 1853 - 1:96 POB model by EdT

Recommended Posts

Jan, 

 

The Jorgenson style screw clamps are home made.  A detailed drawing and instructions for making these are included in The Naiad Frigate, Volume I.  Also included is information to make a simpler version of the clamps.  I have used both types for years and find them indispensible.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have just gone through your log Ed and found it fascinating and a learning experience.  I however have a question on your choice of wood for planking since you plan to paint the hull.  Why not use Beech which is sturdy but pliable and easy to bend?  A dedicated student.

David B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

David, thanks for your question.  I guess the simple answer is that I have a lot of hard maple left over from past furniture projects, so partly it was a matter of convenience.  I have not used beech much and do not have any lying around.  Apart from the ready supply, maple does very well for the purpose - its hard, sands well and takes a good finish.  I would say that except for the flecked grain, it is an ideal model wood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I can get I use it as it looks nice and is close grained. and bends easily.  Poplar is cheaper and works great as well and when painted you cannot tell the difference.

David B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed, I've just started reading your work(s), lured by the reviews of your book(s). Beautiful work and nice clear explanations. Takes a lot to impress this former Jersey-man and I am  very impressed. Thanks, and I'm following along, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America 1853 – POB 1:96
Part 26 – Hull Planking continued

 

With the completion of the curved strakes around the stern, planking of the hull continued downward – or upward in the pictures of the inverted hull.  This planking again begins at the stern, but after the fourth curved strake, further planking butts into this strake.  The point where this occurs is called the “knuckle” of the counter.  This mysterious term and the line it describes will be seen on the drawings.  At this break point on the original ship, a transom was fitted to bed the ends of the planks.  This can be seen on the framed model, but on the POB version it is incorporated into the solid stern block.  The first picture shows the first two butted planks on the starboard side.

 

post-570-0-61509200-1445001599_thumb.jpg

 

Because the first several of these planks intersect the curved planks at an acute angle, they are “cut in” to the last curved plank to avoid a sharp tapered edge that could not have been caulked.  This cutting into the last curved strake is shown in the next picture.

 

post-570-0-43333000-1445001600_thumb.jpg

 

The planks should enter the joint in a fair line with their ends tapered down to about half width to fit into the cutout.  These cutouts are made by first marking the point where the plank will end, then plunge-cutting perpendicular to the plank with a sharp chisel to start the joint.  The edge along the plank is then pared out in a fair line as shown in the above picture.  Note the thickness of these planks.  The last two curved planks are the upper planks of the 6” thick wale and are therefore heavier.  The next photo shows the butted strake being fit into the joint.

 

post-570-0-73788200-1445001600_thumb.jpg

 

Additional butted planks continued to be added.  When the ends of the butts reached an angle of 45 degrees or so, cutting in is eliminated and the ends simply butted into the last curved strake.  In the next picture this planking has reached the sternpost and the sternpost rabbet is being trimmed at the top to allow the next planks to be seated into it.

 

post-570-0-26626900-1445001601_thumb.jpg

 

The next picture shows the first plank being fitted into the rabbet.  Some curving was necessary as can be seen.

 

post-570-0-76623700-1445001601_thumb.jpg

 

The next picture shows wale planking proceeding downward and the status of the planking from the bottom.

 

post-570-0-26231000-1445001602_thumb.jpg

 

The last picture shows progress at the bow.  Fitting the “hooding ends” of the planks into the stem rabbet was simpler than the work at the stern.  A heavy clamp was used to make sure these ends were held well into the rabbet and tight against their neighbors.

 

post-570-0-10492500-1445001603_thumb.jpg

 

This picture shows that a lot of strake dropping and use of stealers will be needed as the forward (and aft) ends of the hull approach.  Completing this planking will be shown in the next post.

 

One may ask, if the model will be painted, why go through all of this authentic, complex joinery.  You will recall that earlier in these posts I mentioned that this version of the model was intended for beginning builders, but that as a learning device, practices that would be necessary in full-framed modeling would be introduced to provide some practice with those methods.  That has been the reason for a number of the methods used on this version.  I hope this will prove helpful.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fantastic work Ed.  As you know, I am a *Glory of the Seas* fan and have discussed our similar interests in the vessels and makers of our examples...   I had been searching for a representation of our vessels in art form and was not disappointed..when I came across in the collection of Dr Norm Adams a perfect example of our ships in an exciting open sea race depicted by famous nautical artist Carl G. Evers.

 

The piece entitled; *CONQUERORS OF CAPE HORN*  YA gaining on Glory en route to San Francisco.  Enjoy

 

 

post-2739-0-97887400-1445004955_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the painting, Rob.  There are so few of Young America.  I had not seen this one before but will look it up.  Thanks for posting.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently refound this image I wanted to show you some time ago when you were framing your larger version.  It depicts a mockup of a midframe of the clipper REDJACKET built by Deacon George Thomas of Rockland Maine.  Pretty impressive and quite large...over 2 stories tall.

 

Rob

post-2739-0-14605800-1445008336_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree Ed...I have been able to locate several paintings of  Glory of the Seas....but as you have pointed out..very few of Young America.  And the only photographs of her that I have come across are the usual ones of her in New York (corrected)

post-2739-0-19892800-1445011114_thumb.jpg

post-2739-0-16270000-1445011118_thumb.jpg

Edited by rwiederrich

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America 1853 – POB 1:96
Part 27 – Completing the Lower Hull Planking

 

Installing all this 6-7” wide planking over the entire hull – at least on the starboard side – was a long slog, but I did enjoyed seeing it progress to completion.  In the first picture, the unplanked area is shrinking.  At this stage the focus was on taking it to the point where one last full-sized plank would just fit into the remaining space left for it to complete the job.

 

post-570-0-31952100-1445194059_thumb.jpg

 

Getting that last space to come out to a 7” opening with parallel sides involved some planning in the placement of the dropped strakes that were necessary both fore and aft.  The next picture shows the method I used for setting points where dropped strakes butt into the previous plank.

 

post-570-0-77720300-1445194059_thumb.jpg

 

I prefer to mark these on the actual work based on the as-built situation rather than try to draft complex planking plans.  The method I use is thoroughly described in the book, so I will only summarize it here.  In the picture a gauge is being used to mark the point where just enough room is available for some number of full-width planks.  This gauge was made by gluing strips of plank to a slip of paper.  The strip was slid along the opening until one of the lines coincided with the edge of the installed planking.  At these points two strakes will become the width of one – by notching the installed strake on a taper back to the last point and tapering the new plank to fit.  All of these points were marked then later re-marked to make any readjustments as planks were installed. This is a simple process that works very well.  I used it on my Victory model, Naiad and both Young America versions – for internal and external plank.

 

In the next picture the gap is narrowing further and the placement of dropped strakes is becoming more critical.

 

post-570-0-13625800-1445194060_thumb.jpg

 

In the picture the narrow space to the left will just accommodate one strake with a taper to half width at the forward end of the opening.  The next picture shows the space left for the last plank at the stern.  

 

post-570-0-68157900-1445194060_thumb.jpg

 

At this stage I was regretting using some slightly darker maple for some of the planks - even though all is intended to be painted.  In the next picture this plank has been installed and all that remains is the closing piece near midship.

 

post-570-0-50547900-1445194061_thumb.jpg

 

In the next picture that piece is being pressed down into place in a tight fit that required no pinning.  A little tapping with a hammer helped.

 

post-570-0-18995500-1445194062_thumb.jpg

 

Finally, the completed planking of the bottom on the starboard side.

 

post-570-0-67987600-1445194062_thumb.jpg

 

And from the stern quarter.

 

post-570-0-14476800-1445194063_thumb.jpg

 

The last picture shows the completed lower planking on the port side down to about midway into the wale.  There are 21 strakes of 6” wale planking on the ship.  The lower part of the hull was left unplanked on this side to show the method of POB framing used.

 

post-570-0-65385100-1445194063_thumb.jpg

 

Even though this model initially started out as a demo of the POB framing only, I got a lot of satisfaction in taking it to this further-than-intended stage and eventually went a bit further.  Next step was to install the channels…..next time.

 

Ed

Edited by EdT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rudolf,

 

Thank you for purchasing the book.  I hope it meets your expectations.

 

It should be no problem printing any of the pdfs on A4 paper.  A4 is slightly narrower and also longer than letter sized, but the pdfs will fit.  When printing from Acrobat or reader, simply click on page setup and change the printer paper size to A4 or do this in Printer Properties.  Also make sure that "Actual Size " or "100%" is checked.  Just to be sure,, check one of the dimensions after printing - for example the maximum breadth on the pattern for the deadflat.  

 

Good Luck.  Let me know how it went.

 

Ed

Hi Ed,

as you suggested I printed the patterns aout in original size on A4 paper, it worked well, there was no distortion.

A few years ago I tried to plank a model of Red Jacket scatch build to Mr Crothers´ plans. I juts could not plant the  round counter properly altough I tried spilling. Will try your method if find the time for modelling again. Your planking  job is exceptional, but once paited will it be visible at all?

The book is a joy to read and a motivation to start buildng again as soon as possible.

 

Greetings,

Rudolf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, everyone.

 

Rudolf, the curved planking around and under the stern is well above the metal sheathing so it will be visible.  Painting will cover most of the planking joint detail.  Bending these planks around the stern requires straight-grained, flexible wood plus a lot of boiling and then drying time.  After that there will still be trimming to do so I suggest starting with slightly oversized planks (say plus one inch or so.  Good luck.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rob, I meant to comment on the last pictures you posted, but keep forgetting.  

 

The two photographs are well known and have been posted on this blog before.  I believe the first - of the port side from forward - was actually taken in New York.  A very excellent print of this can be found in the book, William Webb, Shipbuilder by Dunbaugh and Thomas.  The dates on these pictures are unknown, but they do show double topsails that were fitted in 1854.  The pictures are much later, however, since they also show pole masts for the t'gallants and above.  The dates for these are unknown.  I think the pictures probably date in the late 1860s/eqarly 1870s.  They offer a wealth of information depending on the quality of the image.  The ones you posted are pretty good.  Bill Crothers had access to the actual photos and based much of his drawing detail on those.  I actually have photos from his files.

 

I appreciate your posting of the image showing poop and forecastle but have some doubts about it.  The drawing clearly shows riveted iron plates and YA was, of course, wood.  There are also some other details that, to me at least are questionable.  The stern view shows stern davits which do not show in any reference.  Also, the stern monkey rail shows turned wood posts and rail that differ from the brass rail shown in the pictures.  It is also clear from the pictures that the poop deck is at the level of the top capping rail (the fancy rail) at the stern and not below it as shown in the sketch.  There is a large opening through the hull below the poop for the aft mooring lines.  This differs from the mooring bitt location on either side of the boomkins shown in the second photo.   Finally, the coach into the cabin deck appears very abbreviated in the fore and aft direction, leaving no room for a necessary main deck vestibule and has the entrance doors on the forward bulkhead as opposed to side entries.  Windows (vs. doors) can actually be seen on the forward bulkhead in one of the photos.

 

The view of the forecastle is closer to the mark but the topgallant rail seems too high and extends aft past the catheads.  Also, there is no samson post to mount the heavers for the windlass below.  More space between the ladderways would also be necessary to make room for operation of the windlass from the fcsle.  Same comments on bulwark openings for the mooring lines.  There are no mooring bitt openings on either photo.

 

While I appreciate your posting of this information, I only mention all this so that those wanting to build the model from the book are not confused by these discrepancies.  I suspect that these drawings are either speculative, typical of the time,  or of another ship.  To me, the iron plates are a tipoff.  There are many unknowns in the actual construction and also the possibility of minor (non-structural) modifications.  Some speculation is always necessary to fill in unknown details.  Where authentic documentation is available (like the photos), I believe it should be paramount.  So, caution is necessary.

 

Ed

Edited by EdT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good input.....though I'm not sure those dots are representative of rivets....just like the centerline dots are not representative of deck rivets.  Personally I feel the dots are suggestive of rib lines and frame lines  NOT rivets.  However, Crothers deck drawing is typical  of the forecastle configuration represented in these drawings.  Plus, the biggest factor we are excluding is the notion that the YA had any deck modifications during her career..and these are represented in these depictions.  I know for a fact Glory of the Seas was heavily modified and I have many photographic evidences of these changes..from year to year and captain to captain.  She nearly looks like a different ship from early to later years.

 

The real question lies..with who, actually possesses the ACTUAL deck/mechanic plans?  Guesses are good....even good guesses....but some leeway must be given..if no one really possesses the authentic plans.

 

And I truly understand your position........Confusion isn't an aid to the process.

 

Those drawings are from a reputable source...and I will provide that later when I get home...if that helps.

 

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Going into the era of composite ships, there was often a mix of old and (then) new technology. For instance, Cutty Sark has iron frames, wooden hull and riveted iron bulwarks. So is it not possible, at the time of the photographs in question, that iron bulwarks had replaced original wooden ones?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lovely planking job, Ed. Sort of hard to know where to stop on this demonstration model. I wonder if you were tempted to complete the planking on the port side?

 

As difficult as planking the stern curved area on your model was I'm wondering what sort of Herculean effort this task might have taken on the real ship!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm.  Interesting response to my criticism of the drawings Rob presented.   I guess I will stand by my comments regardless of  speculation about various changes that were possible or may have been made.  While there is a record of changes made to the rig and of damages and repairs resulting from two incidents at sea, there are no reports of major structural repair or changes.

 

Throughout the project, and especially after the decision to write the book, I made every effort to to stick to what was known about the ship from original sources.  I wanted to avoid challenges to the authenticity of the drawings or the model.  The purchasers, readers and those who decide to build the model deserve no less.  In a project that will take an effort of four or five years, I also owed that to myself.  Fortunately, we have the exhaustive work of Bill Crothers.  Meeting Bill, discussing his research, understanding his meticulous attention to detail and backtracking through some of his sources convinced me I was in good hands.  Some speculation was definitely required.  Much of this was on minor, inconsequential detail,  but there were cases where I needed to speculate on structural design.  For example, I had to decide between some different approaches to framing the eliptical stern.  The method I chose is typical and probable, but not documented.  For this reason I planked over this intricate work so any claims about its authenticity would not detract from the model.  There were other similar cases.  Even with this level of care, I expect there will be issues.  I will be concerned only by those that arise from original sources and take Bill's good advice on all others that "no one can prove you wrong."

 

Greg, I appreciate your questions on how far to take the demo model.  As I hope you will see, I continued to work beyond what is shown in these last posts to include deck planking and facilities to almost the same point as the framed model - the state covered in Volume I of the book. Both models are now at about that point.  While I do not intend to take the POB model any further, it has been a temptation.  At times I have wondered if that is the model I should rig.  However, as this model started out purely to demo the POB framing method - without expectation of producing a quality finished model - I must confess to not always taking the care I took with the framed version.  If you see the model, this may be apparent.  So, the plan is to continue on with the 1:72 framed model.  I hasten to add, however, that Volume II will cover the masting and rigging for either version equally and that the POB version would be a very attractive fully-rigged alternative.  At 1:96 it will also consume less space.

 

Ed

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks

Ed for your kind remarks.  I will respectfully defer to your expertise.  I suspect Crothers deck drawing of the YA must be in error...suggesting that the forecastle you modeled is the accurate one.

 

Fantastic job

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe there is some confusion here, Rob.  Crothers drawings are not in error and are consistent with the photos and other original data.   I have used them in drafting my drawings.  I believe the sketch you posted - not Bill Crothers drawing -  is in error or of a different ship and that could be confusing for those following this blog.

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With all due respect, Rob, the beautifully drawn isometric drawings of bow and stern you posted appear to be of another vessel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe there is some confusion here, Rob.  Crothers drawings are not in error and are consistent with the photos and other original data.   I have used them in drafting my drawings.  I believe the sketch you posted - not Bill Crothers drawing -  is in error or of a different ship and that could be confusing for those following this blog.

 

Ed

Sorry for any confusion Ed.  I gathered my information from Model Shipways from a 1951 rendering.  These were drafted from a decorative builders half model in the Smithsonian Institute.  (USNM 160135)  I suppose Model Shipways could be in error.  I am also confused by Crothers renderings on page 416 of his book that depicts the YA with a similar forecastle as the drawing I provided.   Further more...the same renderings are provided as examples of YA configuration in the book, British and American Clippers, by David MacGregor, ISBN 1-555750-084-3 

Any direction would be appreciated.

 

Rob(I did make the error of YA being in SanFrancisco...it was NY..in the B/W images I provided, I corrected the mistake)

Edited by rwiederrich

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to thank everyone here who participated in the NRG conference in Mystic and who offered kind comments on the models and took interest in them.  I was delighted to meet some of you who follow this and the other Young America blog.  The models are now safely returned to their berths and ready for the next construction efforts.  Again, thanks for your responses to the model - and the book!

 

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Young America 1853 – POB 1:96
Part 28 – Upper Channels/Poop Margin Plank

 

First let me say that although I am now posting to both this log and the 1:72 framed version log, I am not working on both of these simultaneously.  I needed to do this in the spring and it damaged my sanity – reading dimensions off the wrong conversion chart of the two posted in the shop being one frequent occurrence.  The final posts on this log cover work that was done in August and September to prepare this model for the NRG conference.  These next several posts will complete the online material for this POB version that I offer to those who might build the model – as a supplement to the content in the book

 

So, the next task after finishing the outer planking was to install the upper channels.  This is straightforward work.  The six inch thick channels are merely cut to length and glued into the slot left for the main rail.  The port upper mizzen channel is being glued in the first picture.

 

post-570-0-13345700-1446060342_thumb.jpg

 

The channel is clamped to pull it into the slight curve of the hull and to keep it horizontal.  Although I did not do this for the model, to support rigging the channels should probably be bolted through each frame timber with functional wire bolts.  These are described in the book.  The wire becomes a real fastening by fixing it with epoxy glue all the way through the hole.  The next picture shows the two forward upper channels being glued in.

 

post-570-0-71889300-1446060342_thumb.jpg

 

The next picture shows the main upper starboard channel in place.

 

post-570-0-07910100-1446060343_thumb.jpg

 

The lower channels were installed later.  The next task – necessary to begin decking of the poop – was to make and install the poop margin plank at the stern.  Poop planking butts into this curved plank.  In the first picture the approximate shape of the outer edge of the stern section is being sketched in by tracing around the stern.

 

post-570-0-58672100-1446060343_thumb.jpg

 

The plank actually fits inside the upper strake of outer planking, so after cutting it out to the rough line it was fitted more precisely inside of the upper side plank.  The top of that plank had been set higher than the beam height by the thickness of deck planking – in this case 3 ½”.

 

In the next picture the fitted curved plank has been pasted to some 3/32”  plywood to reinforce it for cutting the inside edge and shaping of the two hook scarph joints at the ends.  In the picture the inside line has been marked out, cut on the scroll saw and the joints are being marked out.

 

post-570-0-45318500-1446060344_thumb.jpg

 

Next the joints were filed out with the reinforcing plywood still pasted on.

 

post-570-0-11883600-1446060345_thumb.jpg

 

The completed margin plank is shown in the next picture, still attached to the plywood.

 

post-570-0-64470300-1446060345_thumb.jpg

 

The plank was then lifted from the plywood with a hobby knife and the paste residue washed off.  The piece was then pinned and glued as shown in the last picture.

 

post-570-0-10617700-1446060346_thumb.jpg

 

Only minimal sanding was done to this piece at this stage – just enough to produce the fair inner curve with no rounding of the forward edge.  This will allow the deck planks to butt neatly.  In the next part, the margin plank will be extended forward along each side to the breast beam.

 

Ed

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model shipcraft.

The Nautical Research Guild puts on ship modeling seminars, yearly conferences, and juried competitions. We publish books on ship modeling techniques as well as our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, whose pages are full of articles by master ship modelers who show you how they build those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you what details to build.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×