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I have always built PoB models and have always used "strip" planking.

 

I am getting a tad experimental with the latest build and thinking of actually doing scale planking on the second layer. 

 

Not a problem getting the planks shaped and curved to  scale size ( well at least within my dexterity level)

 

But how best to stick on these "little bits of wood" - strips was so much easier.

 

On a single layer planked build the clamping in position is fairly easy but on a nicely finished smooth first layer it aint so.

 

I dont want to pin them unless absolutely necessary - my pin work is just NOT neat - i can resort to my normal eccentric arrangements of clamps, rubber bands etc ect but there must be a " standard" method.

 

I have some plank screws for fixing by screwing in adjacent to the plank  but I find them really clumsy.

 

Oh - added complication - my skin doesnt like CA much and i am quite a messy worker and also I find that CA on a surface tends to ruin the surface for finishing  and I dont intend to paint.  So quick stick with CA i would rather avoid.

 

Suggestions welcome - or do I have to face the awful reality - its experience that matters and I am about to acquire some the hard way ?

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Hi Spyglass

 

you don't need to drive the pin through the second planking, just drive the pin in the first planking using the edge of the pin to hold the second planking in place. That way you don't end up with holes in your second planking.

 

If you look at the bottom of the following link I've got a couple of pictures showing just that.

 

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/6357-le-mirage-by-fnick-corel-wood-175/page-3#

 

Hope this helps

 

Nick

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And remember - a little bit of glue goes a long way. You don't need to drop the whole bottle onto one plank for it to be held in place. Just a little skim on the mating surfaces will allow minor adjustments as well. I've found that a little bit on BOTH surfaces sort of acts like contact cement rather than just PVA or wood glue on its own

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Greetings Spy...

 

I use the small brass nails typically supplied with kits. I drive them in just enough to hold the plank until glue sets, then I take them out for reuse. Relative to glue I use CA for the quick hold at the plank ends and carpenter's glue for the balance of the process. Don't worry at all about the small holes left by the nails - they will fill in automatically when the hull is sanded and painted or sealed. Additionally, I use spring paper clips, cloths pins, and small carpenter's clamps that can be bought at Home Depot, Lowe's, etc. I shy away from modelling tools since most of it is Chinese junk and poorly conceived. However, the use of these clamps  may be be practical given your circumstances. I would just use the nails and/or pins and be done with it.

 

wq3296

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I never use pins. I shape each plank with either water and my fingers or, for extreme bends, use steam. I let the plank dry off the model, then glue it on using either white or yellow glue. A few moments' finger pressure is all it takes.

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Thanks for all the suggestions chaps.

 

I tried a test with various method - i am not painting the hull which will be box /pear and the pin holes show, edge pinning tends to leave dents in the edges I find.

 

Hummmmmmm - I wonder if I am just using a white glue thats taking just a little too long to grab?  Anybody any recomendations that are available in UK - I have always just used evo stik standard wood glue and its been fine for strips. 

 

I think I may be in my usual overthinking mode !!!

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I use Nick's method. The pushpins into the frames with the plastic part holding the wood.  PVA glue (not the white stuff but the carpenter's) works well.  I'm also finding if you apply the glue and wait a few minutes, it tacks up nicely.  I probably don't need to pin the wood, but old habits die hard.

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Thanks again folks i popped across the road to a neigbour who is a "fullsize" wood worker and indeed he is using various Titebonds

First trials seem to do the trick

 

( I probably wasnt clear enough on my first question - I have no problems at all with full length strips - elastic bands, wood strips clamped across, short lengths pinned close , lot of pegs,   clamps etc etc.   ( Oh and the most importanat for me - a good stem rabbet to hold the ends in place ) 

 

But its the ends of the shorter  plank pieces which was giving me a bit of grief  and it seems as if the glue "time" was the issue.

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I've found that you can get a very quick initial 'bite' out of regular Titebond wood glue if you use the proper technique.

 

1 - apply a very thin layer of glue to the plank.  Set it aside to tack up.

 

2 - apply another thin layer of glue to the hull where you are going to place the plank.

 

3 - using very light pressure, position the plank where you want it.  Pre-bending is a very good thing here if needed, very slight bends with thin planks are probably fine without it.

 

4 - once properly located where you want the plank, use your fingers and apply as much pressure as possible without breaking something.  The plank will bond like you used CA.

 

I used only heat in 95% of all my planks for bending on the 2nd planking of the AVS.  For some very tight bends at the ends (and with very short planks) I used water and heat.

 

When I did need to do something additional to clamp a plank, I used collar pins, so that the pinning was from above on a larger shoulder, rather than using the edge of the pin, which as you noted can easily leave dents.

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Whats the problem with using cyanoacrylic glue in place of wood glue?  There are some very nice ones out there and with lots of options thin thick gap closing gel.  they hold great and are easy to use so why not use them in place of wood glue?

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They (CA glues) will soak into the wood and stains it.

 

If you are planning on painting the planking, then CA is certainly an option, but for a natural finish hull, not so much.

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Whats the problem with using cyanoacrylic glue in place of wood glue?  There are some very nice ones out there and with lots of options thin thick gap closing gel.  they hold great and are easy to use so why not use them in place of wood glue?

 

The general feeling is that CA doesn't last long. With time it turns brittle and loses adhesion. Wood glue has proven it's value in holding wood to wood much better than CA in the long run. 

But maybe somebody else can confirm/deny this?

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